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Warming strobe filters


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#1 oskar

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 11:31 AM

I saw the news and this old thought came to my mind again. What is your experience from warming the strobes in green temperate waters? I've seen the effect in blue waters and like it, but how about green temperate waters? Any examples?

My strobes are daylight (5600K) and it would be easy to add a warming filter under the diffuser.

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Cheers
/O

#2 Timmoranuk

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 12:28 PM

Keep using your cool (5600k) strobes in green water. When you warm up the foreground in post, the greeness of the water column will improve. If you shoot with a warm strobe in temperate waters, cooling the foreground in post will shift the hue of the water column away from green and towards blue.

HTH, Tim
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#3 bcliffe

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 11:58 AM

I shoot in the St. Lawrence river, freshwater and very green. My main subject is actually models. My goal is to make the water blue and the models skin look like skin, as much in camera as possible.

My method. Camera set to a tungsten WB, and a full CTO on the flashes.

Background water becomes blue and anything exposed by the flash is colour corrected.

An example with very little post production colour correction.
http://www.modelmayh...io/pic/24810237

Cheers
Ben






Edited by bcliffe, 15 June 2012 - 11:59 AM.


#4 derway

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 04:42 PM

Alex has an article on his web site about this, which includes examples of green water:

http://www.amustard....=...news&size=s
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#5 diver dave1

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 08:16 PM

Ben,
That is really a lovely pic near 1000 islands.
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#6 MortenHansen

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 04:49 AM

I think it all depends on which type of image you want to create. The warming filters are great for tropics, because it gives you a nice blue. Having dived a lot in Denmark/Norway I personally think that it looks wrong if an image of say, kelp, has blue water in the background.
In my opinion, go with the cool strobes and get that nice emerald green. Have a look at the winning pic on the weekly competition, great example of how green water images can be absolutely stunning!

Most importantly have fun with it- Morten.

#7 bcliffe

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 07:24 AM

Thanks Dave!


I think it all depends on which type of image you want to create.


+1on this. The use of filters (or lack there of) should be used to align yourvisual concept of what you want to capture. There is no right or wrong withrespect to using them or not. I don't always do what I describe above, thoughwhen it comes to capturing people in water generally that is my approach.


Cheers
BC

Edited by bcliffe, 18 June 2012 - 07:25 AM.