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Storage ccessories for the D800/5D3 cameras (or any high capacity requirements)


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#1 Drew

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 11:33 PM

Now that I've had a couple of months to play with the cameras, one thing came sorely clear, storage space and speed were lacking!
With the RAW files of the D800 hitting 40+MB (70+ uncompressed), and the ALL-I video codec hitting 90mbps (44mins in 32GB), on a long trip, the old 1TB drives can run out... not to mention the old USB 2.0 looonngggg download times. Assuming one shoots 600 shots a day on the D800, that's 24+GB x X number of days and having redundancy. My 1TB mini drives get filled up pretty quickly.
With the larger file sizes and longer times, I still don't want to travel like I do for a Red shoot (12TB RAID units etc etc). However USB 3.0 and eSATA are necessary for speedy transfer and backup. I use the CALDIGIT USB 3.0 express 34 card and the AData eSATA Sil3132 card. With newer laptops, USB 3.0 is standard and I think very necessary (damn you Apple! Posted Image)
I just picked up 4 of the WDC passport 2TB USB 3.0 drives. I'll put a 2TB in my laptop (disassembly required!) and use the 4 on USB 3.0 as backups. Unlike the more serious photographers like Alex Mustard, I don't like weeding out the throw outs all afternoon when on location. Usually I don't have the time, but also I can't be bothered.
With USB 3.0 speeds being fast enough to compete with eSATA, it is the new standard in quick port transfer. It is also bus powered unlike eSATA. I'd still use eSATA for video like RAID because it is faster for large file writes but Red SSD readers now USB3.0 and FW800 ready, I think eSATA is going to be out the door sooner than later.

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#2 loftus

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 11:39 PM

Rather than weeding out, just pick the keepers; should take about 5 minutes. ;)
Nikon D800, Nikon D7000, Nauticam, Inons, Subtronic Novas. Lens collection - 10-17, 15, 16, 16-35, 14-24, 24-70, 85, 18-200, 28-300, 70-200, 60 and 105, TC's. Macs with Aperture and Photoshop.

#3 Drew

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 03:28 AM

You can't weed video as easily and the different cuts may be useful in the final edit.

Same for timelapse, sequence shots etc. Plus being brutal just don't ask to borrow my drives when you run out of space. ;)

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#4 Undertow

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 07:15 PM

i find myself shooting much more carefully now with the D800 - I realize how large the images are and its almost making me value each 'click' much more. Feels like back in the film days a bit. Still got my D700 when I just need to fire away. Of course I'm referring to topside, cant afford to house the D800 anytime soon (still D700 UW).

then as loftus says, trying when I can to just pick keepers though it doesn't always happen.
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