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Manual focus or automatic focus if you shoot macro with 60mm ?

Focus manual

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#1 PhotographingBlind

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 01:08 AM

I'm confused some books say if you shoot macro, focus manual and others automatic.
What is the best way ?

I have the older version of the nikon 60mm macro, and sometimes it is a hard timme getting it focused.
Somebody experiences with this lens ?

Somebody that can tell me the advantage of focus lock ?
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#2 davichin

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 01:17 AM

For a 60mm I use AF. Focus lock allows you to fix a focus distance and then move in/out to focus on an exact point (an eye...)
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#3 MortenHansen

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 04:27 AM

I would have to agree with davichin, go for AF with a 60, I also use AF on my 100mm, even with a 1.4 teleconverter attached, but it would be impossible without the focus lock+focus light.
I think the focus lock is super important, you can "roughly" focus on your subject, then rock back and forth with your elbows on the substrate to get the focus on the exact spot that you want it. Be careful with corals/marine-ilfe when you support yourself with your elbows.

If you find that your focus keeps searching a lot, maybe you should try to get a nice and bright focus light- it makes a huge difference in focus speed! :)

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#4 PhotographingBlind

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 04:29 AM

Thanks for the info ! My problem is that my 60mm grinds a little bit to search his focus.
Any tips on focusing ?
Its the older version of nikon 60mm.
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#5 PhotographingBlind

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 04:32 AM

If you use focus lock, you have to keep the same distance but you can recompose your shot. Am i right ?
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#6 sharky1961

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 04:32 AM

I also would advice you to buy a good fokuslight

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#7 MortenHansen

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 04:35 AM

Thats right, it locks focus to a certain distance as long as focus lock is pressed down- then you can recompose- try it out a few times on land first, its pretty easy stuff really :)

#8 PhotographingBlind

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 04:36 AM

I have a metalsub hid 200 with photo and video diffuser it has 5000 lumen.
Its not the perfect focus light. It dusn't go out if you take a picture...

Edited by PhotographingBlind, 05 July 2012 - 04:38 AM.

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#9 MortenHansen

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 05:25 AM

That should work perfectly as a focus light though- when you're shooting macro you'd 'normally' be shooting with apertures of f.8 or lower which will block out almost all ambient light, even from a fairly powerful torch. Don't worry too much about it if it doesn't turn off, theres ways around it.

To test it, try to take a picture with your "standard macro settings" mine are ISO 100, f.8, 1/250, but only leave your torch on, turn off your strobes, then you will see if the torch affects your image at all, ideally the shot should be completely black :)

If the image is lit up by your torch then you have three options:

1: Stop down your exposure a little until the image is black (not recommended if you want the nice bokeh found around f5.6-f8)
2: Put extra diffusers on the torch to reduce the strength (pieces of tupperware or white plastic bags work well)
3: Buy a weaker focus light

Hope this helps- Morten





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