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Loopholes in conservation of Bluefin tuna.


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#1 DamonA

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 06:42 PM

The Black Fish successfully released over a thousand bluefin tuna back into the Adriatic Sea from cages at a fish farm near the island of Ugljan.


http://www.globalani...-farming/78424/


American Company- Kali Tuna, a subsidy of the US fish farming company Umami Sustainable Seafood based in San Diego, California
Umami CEO Oli Steindorsson believes the company’s operations are helping to sustain the species. In a 2011 interview with SmartPlanet, Steindorsson says, “We’re protecting them from predators. Fish spend 80 percent of their life searching for or eating feed. We’re providing food for them, keeping them in a clean environment. For every kilo we feed the fish, they would need three to five kilos in the wild because they are moving so much more. Mother Nature will not give them fish to eat every day.” What he fails to mention that these fish are only being fed in order to kill them once they have reached a marketable size. And the only predators bluefin tuna need protection from are humans. The species has been around for more than 400 million years, making them older than the Himalayas and quite able to survive on their own.


The Blackfish- http://www.facebook....theblackfishorg

Edited by DamonA, 20 July 2012 - 06:57 PM.


#2 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:56 PM

It always surprises me how many divers would happily eat bluefin tuna, but won't eat shark fin soup.

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#3 Marjo

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 06:58 PM

Or any seafood for that matter...there isn't much seafood that can be eaten in good concience these days. Wild Alaskan Salmon maybe, because of their extemely stricktly controlled take and daily counting of fish. Possibly also responsibly farmed (freshwater) tilapia. My mind gets blown when "conservationists" have shrimp, prawn and the like (which was trawled and led to the killing of massive amounts of by catch and total destruction of coral and habitats). I dont really eat seafood anymore, because it is too difficult to really know which fish is ok to eat. Those "safe to eat species cards" that have been distributed in the past few years don't necessarily help either, because there are such regional differences. For example, it might be OK to eat grouper in Florida, but down here in the VI there aren't many groupers left and taking even one off the reef would be bad. Not to mention that the are seasonal differences. So my opinion is that, these days if you really care about tge ocean, you won't eat seafood anymore.

Edited by Marjo, 21 July 2012 - 07:00 PM.


#4 diver dave1

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 07:27 PM

Marjo,
Your comments remind me of the vegan at work. She wears a leather jacket, leather belt and leather shoes. Obviously, she finds cows that volunteer their hide.

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#5 Marjo

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:37 AM

Diver Dave,

Cows are by no means threathered or endangered. You can eat beef until the cows come home, and you will still be assured that the cow-populations of this planet are plenty robust. The same can not be said of any fish populations. What has happened to fish stock in only the past decade is a decline unprecedented in history. Many believe that we are at a point in 2012 where collapse is so imminent that we cant even turn this around and that the chain reaction that has started will lead to a total collapse of fisheries. This should be front page news every day, but since few people see what is under the surface, this isn't even on the radar of most people. I guess living on an island and seeing first hand what has happened to fish populations in the past decade helps drive the point home for me. And for the record, I am not a vegan, I come from farm country, grew up around both slaughter and hunting. I can tell a responsible population cull from the robbery and destuction of natural resources. What we are doing to the oceans right now is heinous and irreversible.

#6 Marjo

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:42 AM

Also, I take offence at the fact that you are in effect calling me a hypocrite. I really do try my best in every aspect of my life to ensure having a minimal negative effect on the oceans.

#7 diver dave1

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 12:28 PM

Marjo,
I believe my comments were misunderstood. I should have written more clearly. Entirely my fault on my poor communication skills.
I was trying to compare divers eating their photo subjects to the vegan wearing leather. It as not a reference to you in any way but I now see how you could have missed my meaning.
Perhaps its good I do not make a living by writing.

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#8 Marjo

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 02:57 PM

Thanks for clarifying Dave. it seemed like such an odd comment, so I am glad this was a misunderstanding. However, the positive thing that came out of this was that me and my hubby have been discussing further ways today to live closer to our ideals.

#9 DamonA

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 04:04 AM

Last time I checked there was lots of prawns and sardines- sure some are gathered in a sustainable way, some aren't- lets stick to Mediterranean/atlantic bluefin tuna they are the species about to check out of this world......stay on the page please! Your digression only serves as argument against the survival of the Bluefin tuna in the first sea invaded by mankind(humans not kind), do this inch by inch, try a mile and they'll(general public/majority) tell you to get lost.

Edited by DamonA, 26 July 2012 - 04:06 AM.