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A surrealistic take on Isla Mujeres whale sharks


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#1 ehanauer

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:18 AM

It seems everybody in the underwater imaging community has been at Isla Mujeres the past couple of months. So I've tried a different take, using a lot of the effects in FCP X.


Here is the link to the movie on YouTube:

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#2 Steve Douglas

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 11:11 AM

Hey Eric,
You got some fine footage there. Guess I am the only one who has never traveled to that spot. IMHO some of the effects you used are fine in and of themselves but for the entire film, it appeared as if it were a film about FX rather than the whale sharks. Kind of reminiscent of brand new editors who feel that the more effects they use the better. And you are certainly no beginner.

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#3 ehanauer

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 12:38 PM

Point taken. My approach to video is telling a story. When I looked at my footage, I couldn't see one. So I decided to make a music video, and use some of the bag of tricks available in FCP X. Otherwise, people would get tired of just watching whale sharks swimming.
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#4 HDVdiver

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 03:10 PM

Seems to be a very different whale shark "experience" to what we get in West Papua. No scuba...snorkel only (that makes shooting video difficult); and the animals seem to be feeding naturally on plankton. At Cenderawasih Bay that seems to only happen when the sun goes down.

Interesting video :)

Edited by HDVdiver, 14 August 2012 - 03:32 PM.


#5 troporobo

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 06:17 PM

I realize that you posted this in relation to the video, and not behavior, but at the risk of diverting the thread I have to say I am surprised by the amount of physical contact that seems to be happening (e.g. 0:25 - 0:35). I have done three whale shark trips and the guides (and materials provided by conservation outfits) are always adamant that no contact is allowed. Is it a different ethos in Mexico?

I did really enjoy the footage. It is a great reminder of how awesome it is to be in the water with them. So thanks for putting this together!

#6 ehanauer

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 07:20 AM

Look again. I think the diver in question did a fantastic job of minimizing contact. When a 20 ton whale shark is heading right at you, you do what's necessary to avoid a collision. She gently touched the shark above the mouth to get over the top, then avoided additional contact as it swam underneath her.
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#7 Autopsea

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 10:40 AM

Well, she jump in front of it in the first place...

#8 Kevster

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 03:29 AM

Nice video, looks like a must do trip.
However i agree with the comment regarding physical contact.

If you dived like this in Western Australia with the whale sharks you would not be allowed back in the water. They are very strict, general rule is to stay 3-4 m away from the shark

Edited by Kevster, 16 August 2012 - 03:40 AM.

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#9 troporobo

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 04:37 AM

Look again. I think the diver in question did a fantastic job of minimizing contact. When a 20 ton whale shark is heading right at you, you do what's necessary to avoid a collision. She gently touched the shark above the mouth to get over the top, then avoided additional contact as it swam underneath her.


Fair enough. I know they are not easy to avoid in that situation. The trick is to get close, but not directly in line. Then they veer direction, and you have to scramble

#10 MK2

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 02:22 PM

During the briefing the guide should have explained that no intentional contact is allowed and to keep atleast 6 ft away... some are very strict about this.

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