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Lighting on Night Dives


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#1 Oceanshutter

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 01:03 PM

While trying to shoot video at night, I have come across a problem that hopefully someone has an answer to. I don't even know what it is technically called.....but I call it Sea lice (feel free to correct me if I am wrong). These seem to be very attracted to light. And when shooting Macro, it takes a little time to get setup for a shot, and by the time I am ready to press record, the camera is smothered with them. Rendering the footage almost useless. Is there a trick around this?

My wife uses her sola red light to take photos, and that seems to help her quite a bit......Is there any solutions for video?

Thanks in advance.
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#2 Drew

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 06:28 PM

Filter the lights to red then white balance. You'll lose about 3 stops of light though. It won't eradicate the sealife (from worms and fish feeding on plankton attracted to the light) but it'll lessen the problem.

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#3 Oceanshutter

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 09:25 PM

Filter the lights to red then white balance. You'll lose about 3 stops of light though. It won't eradicate the sealife (from worms and fish feeding on plankton attracted to the light) but it'll lessen the problem.


Thanks Drew. Do you do this shooting with your 5d? 3 stops might be too much....don't you think?
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#4 Drew

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 02:30 AM

Been doing that since 98. :) Some people find it doesn't help muchl. I've found it helps somewhat. Whether it's the lower power (2-3k lumens after filtering on HMI light or about 1k lumen with 150W 24V halogen) or color temp I haven't tested it enough to figure it out. I have also tried having a much brighter light pointing up and then using less powerful lights around it does help a bit too. Sometimes I just turn off the lights and wait for the stuff to go off, then start again. There's no easy way to avoid this issue.

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#5 Nick Hope

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 03:49 AM

Sometimes I just turn off the lights and wait for the stuff to go off, then start again.

I do this a lot. It's also good for scaring the s**t out of other divers.

#6 escape

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 05:24 AM

I do this a lot. It's also good for scaring the s**t out of other divers.

Same here. I love to watch bioluminescent plankton. :)