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Mollusk? From Ambon, Indonesia


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#1 lindai

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 06:15 AM

Can someone please tell me what this is? There were several in a small area, this is one of the "bigger" ones - they were all very small. They were out during the day, in a "muck" environment.

Thanks for the help!

Linda

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#2 JimSwims

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 12:47 AM

Some sort of Headshield Slug?Bubble Shell, Cephalaspidae? Perhaps look in Haminoeidae and Bullidae??

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#3 JimSwims

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 12:52 AM

Haminoea sp
http://www.nudipixel...photo/00041544/

Cheers,
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#4 lindai

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 05:21 AM

Super! Thanks very much ..... I am always on the lookout for any type of sea slug, and didn't realize this was one......

Linda
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#5 Leslie

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 08:43 AM

I'm not sure Jim - the head just doesn't look right to me. Linda, I've sent your photo to a couple of mollusc colleagues for their opinion.

#6 JKrumsick

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 09:33 AM

I may be way off the mark...and probably am... but those black spots look like chromatophores to me... hence something in the cephalopod family. Baby cuttlefish?

#7 JimSwims

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 12:39 PM

Yes I wondered about the head, could it be the oraltentacles/flaps are in a retracted state?

Linda do you have any other shots/angles? Certainly don't take my guess as definitive.

Your subject does have the same appearance as well as the slime trail seen in the other image.

Cheers,
Jim.

Edited by JimSwims, 25 October 2012 - 12:43 PM.

My photostream on Flickr My gallery on Redbubble

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#8 Leslie

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 02:55 PM

Not a baby cephalopod, sorry!

Lindsey Groves, the museum's mollusc collection manager passed on the image to Angel Valdes, co-author with Terry Gosliner & Dave Behrens of "Indo-Pacific Nudibranchs & Sea Slugs". He confirmed that Linda's animal is what they called Haminoeid sp 2 in the book. One thing that keeps it out of the genus Haminoea is the extremely long tail which you can sorta see in Linda's pic & clearly in Indra's Nudipixel pic.

#9 lindai

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 03:10 PM

Thanks very much Leslie! Some other images show the long tail better and I was wondering if it was laying eggs. Now I see it in the book....

Thanks to everyone for solving this mystery.

Regards, Linda
Linda Ianniello - Nikon D200, Sea & Sea housing, Inon ring strobe, dual Inon Z220 strobes, Nikon 60mm and 105mm lenses.