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tiny shrimp with 6 split fore-claws?


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#1 echeng

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:07 PM

Does anyone recognize this shrimp? I have photographed it only once before. It is about the size of an algae shrimp (tiny!), and was in Triton Bay, Indonesia.

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#2 MortenHansen

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 06:02 AM

No idea what this is, but I know that I never found one, and that its pretty darned awesome with the claws open! Sort of a porcelain crab gone shrimp!

#3 Leslie

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:15 AM

Neostylodactylus litoralis. Beautiful shots. The backlighting really shows the structure of the legs. With that amount of spinulation I suspect it's a filter feeder.

#4 echeng

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:18 PM

Thank you, as always, Leslie. It was tiny tiny tiny, and there was some current. They were hard shots to get. :)

OK, the books say "inshore hairy shrimp" matches that scientific name. :)
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#5 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 02:07 AM

That's very cool. Definitely looks like it is filter feeding in the first shot.

And the bug floating past is probably a cyclopoid copepod - something like Oithona sp.

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#6 Leslie

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 08:16 AM

:-D I didn't even notice the copepod!