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First DSLR Outing


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#1 Scuba_Pro

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 04:41 AM

Hi Guys,

So let me paint the picture for you:
  • Used a G10, 2 strobes and stacked macro lenses for around 3 years all on manual
  • Now upgraded to the 7D with the NA-7D, two Z240's, flat port, zen mini dome
  • Today was my first venture under with the new gear, only arrived 2 days ago
  • Was very worried about the steep learning curve involved however I am quite pleased with results....opinions?
  • I didn't try anything creative today (bokeh etc.), just getting used to how the system works, using everything on manual again
  • I am SOO SOO HAPPY i made the jump to DSLR, so much fun & flexibility with lighting
  • Today was with the 100m macro
  • Still need to get used to strobe positioning to get rid of backscatter
  • LOVE LOVE LOVE the 100mm for fish shots!!
  • Here are a few pics below, please go to for more from today

Posted Image
Arc-Eye Hawkfish - Paracirrhites arcatus by LukeyG46, on Flickr


Posted Image
Chromodoris tritos by LukeyG46, on Flickr


Posted Image
Hawksbill Turtle - Eretmochelys imbricata by LukeyG46, on Flickr

Tomorrow I will play around with some bokeh effects and different strobe positions/settings....

Any comments are very welcome,

Thanks in advance,

Luke

Sorry for me pics: http://www.flickr.co...luke_gordon_uw/

#2 Steve Williams

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 05:42 AM

Looking good sir! How much fun is that. How have you set up the 7D to focus? Are you using the back button? Whichever way you choose the hawkfish is an example where you could have focused on the eye then recomposed to get the tail in the frame and had a maybe more pleasing composition. One recommendation would be to stay with a subject longer and try out different techniques with the same critter. It will be easier to see and understand what works for you. Have a blast with it.

Cheers,
Steve

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#3 Alex_Tattersall

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 06:59 AM

Nice one Luke, DSLR makes life so much easier, doesn’t it!
www.flickr.com/photos/alextattersall

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#4 Scuba_Pro

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 07:09 AM

Thanks guys,

Steve, the hawkfish photo's were all taken in very strong current so I struggled a bit with the composition of him, I tried to get the tail in but alas my inexperience holding and using the big rig in current was tough, I will work on it, usually i spend a long time with each subject.

Today was a good day though finding out about how it works and strobe power etc.

Thanks for the advice

#5 Scuba_Pro

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:52 AM

When you say the back button Steve do you mean changing where the lens focus is? i.e. the focus point?

Thanks

#6 Steve Williams

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:19 AM

Nope, I mean using the AF on button on the back of the camera to tell the lens to focus then using the shutter to make the image. One of the benefits of the 7D and DSLRs like it is that you can change what some of the buttons do to make it more user friendly in a housing. Check out page 234 in the manual when you get a chance. No hurry. If you can feel the detent on the shutter that is the half press consistently it might not help you. If you are using gloves or can't feel the half press then it's a great help. Some of us just get in the habit of using the back button to focus especially shooting macro that we just shoot that way all the time.

Check out this article from Canon http://www.learn.usa...f_article.shtml

Steve

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Canon7D & 40D, 60mm, 100mm, 17-40L, Tokina 10-17, Nauticam 7D, Sea & Sea MDX-40D YS-250's ULCS arms, Lightroom


#7 Scuba_Pro

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 04:55 AM

Interesting Steve, Thank you,

Well I read up on the button use and it does seem quite useful when your able to stay still around your subject, not much use in crazy currents though?

Today wasn't as successful as I had hoped, the currents were mad! Making staying steady hard and throwing a lot of sand into the water.

I am having a little trouble with backscatter in my shots, am I right in thinking pointing the strobes out more so the edge of the beams light the subject will help?

I think my main things to work on are filling the frame and strobe positioning right now.....

Posted Image
Black-foot Anemonefish - Amphiprion nigripes by LukeyG46, on Flickr

Posted Image
Black-foot Anemonefish - Amphiprion nigripes by LukeyG46, on Flickr

Posted Image
Freckled Hawkfish - Paracirrhites forsteri by LukeyG46, on Flickr

#8 Scuba_Pro

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:04 PM

Started using the AF- ON button when there isn't much current, I can see the advantages.

Here are some more, with the aim of underwater trying to fill the frame, reduce backscatter and this time adding a bit of bokeh


Posted Image
Black-foot Anemonefish - Amphiprion nigripes by LukeyG46, on Flickr


Posted Image
Black-foot Anemonefish - Amphiprion nigripes by LukeyG46, on Flickr


Posted Image
Sarcophyton sp. by LukeyG46, on Flickr


Posted Image
IMG_8116-as-Smart-Object-1 by LukeyG46, on Flickr


Posted Image
IMG_8133-as-Smart-Object-1 by LukeyG46, on Flickr

Thanks,

#9 JimSwims

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:12 AM

Love the Jorunna rubescens blowing you a kiss! You've certainly hit the ground running with the DSLR.

Cheers,
Jim.

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#10 Scuba_Pro

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:25 AM

Thank you Jim,

Very much appreciated,

I cant believe how much fun it is using a DSLR than I ever thought it would be, I was scared to make the jump before, now I wish I had done it earlier.