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Red Anthozoan in Lembeh

Goniophora coral anemone commensal shrimp Ancyclomenes venustus

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#1 Nick Hope

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 08:06 AM

Filmed at Aer Perang in the Lembeh Strait.

 

The shrimps are "graceful commensal shrimps", Ancylomenes venustus, but what is/are the coral/anemones that they are on?
 
The red polyps look like they might be a species of Goniophora, but they have a less regular pattern than other examples I've seen. Also the white tentacles such as the bulb-like tentacle in the lower left of the 3rd clip at 0:26 looks more like something like Entacmaea quadricolor. I'm wondering if there might even be 2 species here mixed???

 

Tropical Pacific Reef Creature Identification by Humann & DeLoach is no more specifc than "Ancylomenes venustus associates with stony corals and anemones".

 



#2 Nick Hope

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:40 PM

I discovered that this is the night anemone, Phyllodiscus semoni. A very interesting anemone with a seriously nasty sting. It mimics stony corals during the day then extends its mouth to feed at night.



#3 Bent C

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:23 AM

I discovered that this is the night anemone, Phyllodiscus semoni. A very interesting anemone with a seriously nasty sting. It mimics stony corals during the day then extends its mouth to feed at night.


That is cool, Nick. Last time I was in Lembeh I dove Police pier with an italian guy that had published a book on dangerous marine creatures, and we where looking for the night anemone there. As far as I understand it, the sting is really quite dangerous and can lead to renal failure. Also, as far as I understand it, it is by night, when it extends its central column to feed, that it is dangerous.
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#4 Nick Hope

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:10 AM

That's right, except Neville Coleman's page says "...it is not the tentacles around this extended mouth, that sting, it’s the fringing ones around the body that do the deed."

 

There are quite a lot of references from scientists who have researched the venom with a view to using it to help develop new drugs for renal problems.

 

This species mimics all sorts of different corals. Check out these 2 videos to see how different it can look:

 

 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Goniophora, coral, anemone, commensal shrimp, Ancyclomenes venustus