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Tokina 10-17mm & diving Cocos


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#1 AMW

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:31 PM

Hello Wetpixelers!

 

I'm heading to Cocos for the first time in September...and looking forward to it!

I had planned to utilize my Tokina 10-17 but after doing some research on http://www.uwphotogr...oting-scenarios

it seems as if the Tokina even at 17mm might still be too wide of an angle for skittish hammerheads who don't get too close. 

 

Has anyone here used the Tokina 10-17 at Cocos and were satisfied with the results, especially of shots taken of hammerheads?

 



#2 davehicks

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:53 PM

Try to add a 1.4 teleconverter to your 10-17 and you will be in good shape. I was very happy with this on my D300 in Cocoa. I have also used the Sigma 15mm on the D800 for Mantas and sharks with good results.

#3 Steve Williams

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:59 PM

Hi partner,

I had a great time with the Tokina at Cocos a couple of years ago.  The issue is really not your lens it's your bubbles.  The hammers wanted nothing to do with bubbles.  If you position yourself next to a cleaning station and don't scare them away the Tokina at 17mm is fine;  The lack of clarity of the water makes using a longer lens a potential problem.

ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/125 on the 7D

 

6025796633_90781cde43_z.jpg

 

I envy you the trip, Cocos is my favorite dive location on the planet.


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#4 Drew

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:26 AM

You want the best experience with fish, go get certified for a rebreather course.  It's sounds daunting but not really.  And your experience with fish won't be the same ever again. :)


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#5 PIG004

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 07:10 PM

You want the best experience with fish, go get certified for a rebreather course.  It's sounds daunting but not really.  And your experience with fish won't be the same ever again. :)

 

Amen so true!



#6 oneyellowtang

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 09:38 PM

2nd time in Cocos I used my 10-17 almost exclusively.

 

First trip I came away with a number of images I was unhappy with because I realized I was too far away (even though I felt like I was "right there..."). Get as close as you can to the cleaning stations, stay low, control your breathing, and be patient. And when you think you are close enough, get closer...

 

The shots from the 2nd trip I was happiest with were shot very close to the subjects - in some cases well within 5 feet. The hammers would get that close at times, the Galapagos would be a little farther away... and I let the Tiger shark pass by at any distance he wanted :o



#7 eyu

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 06:50 AM

You want the best experience with fish, go get certified for a rebreather course.  It's sounds daunting but not really.  And your experience with fish won't be the same ever again. :)

I agree about your experience with fish, but rebreathers and shallow water blackouts resulting in death scares me.


Edited by eyu, 06 July 2013 - 12:09 PM.

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#8 davephdv

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 05:37 PM

The best shots will be with your widest lens

Bit you will get a lot fewer of them. The rebreather may be a good idea, but you need to be very proficient and familiar with your gear.
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