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Full service of housing


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#1 Guillaume L

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 10:07 PM

Hello all,

I would like to know how many photographers out there (especially any pro shooters) do a FULL service on their housing? And do you did yourself or send it back to the manufacturer?

I'm talking about an inspection and replacement (if necessary) of every single O'ring on their housing +/- a pressure test.

Does anyone think whether this activity extends the life of the housing or reduce the incidence of flooding?

Cheers


#2 Paul Kay

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 12:11 AM

Servicing depends on what you are doing and how you care for your equipment but is well worthwhile if you anticipate a long reliable life from your housing. Obviously, the manufacturer should be able to bring a housing up to full spec but the are independant repairers who can do so too. If you are careful with your housing, wash it well to remove all salt , dry it and keep it free from sand and so on, then it will need less servicing. If on the other hand it is used heavily and extensively, and especially if it is used in chlorinated water, it will need more frequent servicing. A FULL service involves stripping a housing down to inspect each seal so they will be replaced as its not worth putting a used one back. A FULL housing also should replace circlips and weakened springs too, so its not just about seals. If any control feels as though it is no longer operating smoothly or if it feels as though it is being tugged back (by a dry 'O' ring) then its time for a service/repair.


Paul Kay, Canon EOS5D/5DII, SEACAM/S45, 15, 24L, 60/2.8 (+Ext12II) & 100/2.8 Macros - UK/Ireland Seacam Sales underseacameras & marinewildlife & paulkayphotography & welshmarinefish

#3 Guillaume L

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 12:30 AM

Thank you
And have you done a FULL service on your housing?

Cheers

#4 Paul Kay

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 03:02 AM

Thank you
And have you done a FULL service on your housing?

Cheers

I have FULLY serviced several housings myself although my current housing has not as yet been fully serviced (it is still not required).


Paul Kay, Canon EOS5D/5DII, SEACAM/S45, 15, 24L, 60/2.8 (+Ext12II) & 100/2.8 Macros - UK/Ireland Seacam Sales underseacameras & marinewildlife & paulkayphotography & welshmarinefish

#5 divengolf

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 06:11 AM

I have done substantial work on my housing (Aquatica AD7000) and find that the toughest part is the reassembly since the tolerances are very exact. And everything must go back in exactly the correct order or else it will not fit. Plus it takes some special tools to reassemble, especially if you have big hands and fingers. If you're mechanically inclined and have lots of patience, it's not a hard task. I find the hardest part is removing and replacing the e-clips on the inside of most buttons.

 

Make sure that you leak test the housing afterward-before putting the camera in. I drop mine down to 15 feet in a pool and leave it for a couple hours. Then go down and push every button and turn every knob to insure that everything is seated properly. Then do a bench vacuum test. Even then, I'm very cautious on the first dive with camera inside. But I have my vacuum system on and a light flashing to tell me the vacuum is holding.



#6 Guillaume L

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 11:04 AM

Thanks for your replies,

Did you think the service was necessary to do?
I.e. Did you pick up (and fix) any problems that would have potentially caused a leak if the service had not been done?

Or did you find those internal O'rings (etc...) to be in great shape without needing replacement?

I'm currently servicing mine (Sea&Sea DX200) for the first time. I'm wondering whether I'm doing more harm than good.

#7 jcclink

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 11:53 AM

Internal o-rings (buttons & controls, etc) must be removed for thorough inspection, so you might as well replace them with new ones.  If you do muck diving the fine sediment will eventually work its way into the bores, making for a sticky button, so servicing will be required more often than a system that is only used in clear/clean water.  Before servicing make sure you have a complete factory rebuild kit including new c-clips.  The clips are fragile & may break on removal, so do not reuse.  Most of my diving is muck, so I usually have an annual service performed.


Edited by jcclink, 27 November 2013 - 06:21 PM.

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