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Hartenberger 250TTLhs / re-coring battery packs


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#1 BottomTime

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 04:57 PM

I’m looking for input from other Hartenberger users out there who have taken the time to re-core the battery backs for their Hartenberger strobes. I currently have a pair of 250 TTLhs’ with 4 batteries. One of the batteries has died (internally shorted battery in the series) and I think another one is on its last leg. The other two are carrying ~70% capacity.

 

As far as I can tell, the factory batteries appear to be made with Sanyo CP-2400SCR cells. They are reported to be among the best available and are capable of 60amp discharge rates, but I haven’t been overly impressed with their longevity. I’ve probably put ~ 200 cycles through mine in the past 3.5 years.

 

As a result, I’m now looking at re-coring with NiMH cells. Some of the new cells are up to 4500mah and can pulse discharge at rates up to 50amps. I know at least one of you out there has done the same. What type of cells did you use? Who did you have assemble the packs?

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

 

 


Mike

 

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#2 bvanant

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 06:32 PM

You can get cell packs made by most of the model airplane guys. Try hangtimes.com and they can build whatever you want.

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#3 Drew

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 03:45 AM

I've used a few different kind of hi-cap batteries on my 250 hs.  The ones that are still available are the Elite 5000 at Cheapbatterypacks.  Like you I have 4 packs but used to keep 2 in Ni-Cd because of the firing speed.  The Elite 5000 can only manage maybe 1-1.25fps when freshly recharged but drops to under 1fps after 40+ fires at full but it can go to about 250-280 flashes.  The Sanyo HR-SCU 3000 fires at 1.5-2fps till about 70 shots but you are limited to about 200 full blasts.

I switched to NiMH anyways because of the Cd content.


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#4 BottomTime

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 12:13 PM

I appreciate the input on the high capacity NiMH cells. I knew there would be a performance hit on the recycle time, but the penalty is higher than I was expecting. However, I only need the fast recycle times occasionally so I think I will go ahead and build two of the packs with the 5000mah cells. How may cycles have you put on your NiMH cells and how have they been holding up? How many cycles did you get out of your NiCd's before they died?

 

I agree with you on the NiCd and the Cd content. I still have two NiCd packs that are holding up for now, but I'm not sure what I'll replace them with. One of the principal reason I bought the Hartenbergers is for the rocket fast recycle time so I've been looking at A123's LiFePO4 cells. I've broken out the callipers and I'm pretty sure I can fit 4 26650's inside the battery compartment (just barely). That will give a 12.8V 2500mah battery pack at 1/2 the weight of the NiCd's. They have better longevity, better safety, better abuse tolerance and equivalent current abilities to the NiCd with no heavy metal problems. On the flip side, I'll have to buy new chargers and do some engineering to get them interfaced and fitted. It might be a good mid-winter tinkering project...


Mike

 

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