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Shooting gelatinous creatures


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#1 Icewater

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 06:02 PM

What am I doing wrong when trying to shoot gelatinous nearly see through object (other than missing DOF) and loosing sharp focus?  Too much light?  Bad background, lack of contrast?  These things are very small and fast.  I know composition isn't the best but they frustrated me trying to capture something decent.   Canon7D 100 macro, 1 DS-161 strobe.  

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#2 Interceptor121

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 08:30 AM

The shadow looks like the strobe is coming from the top. The background is similar color this looks a nightmare

One attempt would be to position the strobe behind and have the light coming through the fish?!?


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#3 Stuart Keasley

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 01:58 AM

I'd suggest trying to get a little lower, try and get a contrasting background behind the subject.

 

Take your time, watch what the fish do for a while to get an idea of their behaviour, where they're likely to stop. The pick up a spot that suits, frame up to get the background as you want it then wait until it comes into shot.

 

It'll take a bit of time and patience, but you'll get there in the end.

 

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Edited by Stuart Keasley, 06 April 2014 - 02:00 AM.

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#4 CamelToad

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 06:02 AM

For this shot I put one strobe behind and another a bit above and to my right. My dive buddy shining a sola800 from under its perch. It's not my fav image, but it was interesting to experiment with strobe positions and such.

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This one was done in much the same way, but no Sola 800 used... 

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#5 dpaustex

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 12:17 PM

A couple of suggestions.

 

For clear/transparent objects, you need to try and backlight. This means you'll need some long arms. If using two strobes, back AND sidelight, and try shooting one on a lower power.

 

Also, on your camera, depends on other issues:  (1) is your lens aperture; you get better depth-of-field the more stopped down you are (larger number); (2) what is your autofocus set to?  Is it to a single, small point with a "focus lock", or does it focus, then "track"?    Set it as a single focus point, then single shot, without tracking.  It looks like you are focused in "front" of your subjects in both photos.

 

Hope this helps!


Edited by dpaustex, 14 May 2014 - 12:18 PM.


#6 Icewater

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 11:11 PM

Thanks everyone.  I posted I knew I missed DOF and focus (obviously) and that I needed new technique to try to capture their body better.  Lens was in sand, can't get any lower, was hovering prone a few inches above sand.  They did not cooperate and perch on other suitable location.  Headed back to same location to practice, practice, practice so when something as beautiful as what James captured with purple eyes shows up I am ready.  Will try different settings suggested.  Now who will hold the thing still while I practice, ha!



#7 E_viking

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 10:09 AM

Another hint can be to try with inward lightning.

Basically pointing the strobe backwards and just using the outer rim of the strobe light to light the subject.

That way you do not illuminate the Background.

It is fun to Play around with!


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#8 okuma

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 03:19 PM

This works for me!

Turn each strobe 90* to the lens axis. 

Now pull them back behind the front of the port face.

Start about 3" between each strobe face and the port body.

Vary this distance to adjust exposure.

Don't laugh until you try this!


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#9 E_viking

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 09:29 PM

The Inwardlightning as Oku dscribed it. Helps y to get a darker background.

The illuminated fish stands out more against the dark background.


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#10 andy_deitsch

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 07:16 AM

You can also try opening up your aperture to get a shallower DOF which will help the fish stand out from the background.

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