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Super Macro

S100 recsea super macro

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#1 adder

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 08:46 PM


I am currently using an Canon S100 in a recsea housing with adaptor for AD wet swaps. I have 2 x sea and sea strobes. I am using 2 x Inon 165AD macro lens.

I just got back from Lembeh and the guide kept finding things that were too small for me using the two 165's.

Is there any lens combination that I can use with the Recsea housing and my S100 that will let me full frame a critter that's say 5mm long?

I have been offered a Olympus OM-D EM-1 Camera in a Nauticam housing that I know will solve the problem but I am otherwise happy with my present setup and a new lens or two or three will be a far cheaper option leaving more money for dive trips.

 



#2 bvanant

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 07:42 AM

5 mm full frame is quite small.  For the EM-1 camera with a sensor that is 18 mm wide that would mean almost 4 x magnification to get the job done. With the 60 mm lens that would mean with a +10 subsee you have a 2.7 magnification which is still not enough magnification for 5mm full scale. Of course you can crop. 

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#3 CamelToad

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 07:13 AM

It'd be very difficult with either of those cameras. Impossible? Not sure...

 

Shooting my Nikon DSLR (D7000 - DX sensor) in Lembeh a few months ago, a 105mm macro lens and +10 Subsee was required to get an image of a pygmy that I didn't need to crop.


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#4 tdpriest

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:54 AM


 

 

 

 

Shooting my Nikon DSLR (D7000 - DX sensor) in Lembeh a few months ago, a 105mm macro lens and +10 Subsee was required to get an image of a pygmy that I didn't need to crop.

 

Probably bigger than 5mm, and a cropped sensor...



#5 CamelToad

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 11:54 AM

Probably bigger than 5mm, and a cropped sensor...

 

The one I am speaking about was about the size of my pinkie nail, so yeah, about 8-10mm or so. Also, I did state DX as you have quoted, not trying to hide anything. 

 

My point is that using a compact with wet lenses is unlikely to get the results the OP is looking for if my DX body, 105, and +10 can barely cut it. I guess I don't get your point.


Edited by CamelToad, 25 April 2014 - 11:56 AM.

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#6 bvanant

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 07:38 AM

I think Tim's point was the same as mine, namely getting a lens system (other than the canon 65) to shoot 5 mm full frame is quite tough even on a highly cropped sensor (like u 4/3). 

Bill


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#7 Interceptor121

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 12:40 PM

If you stack an UCL100+UCL165 with the S100 (you need to change your mount) you are looking at approx 18x13.5 mm frame.

 

There is nothing that will get down to 5mm. The smallest tiger shrimp can be captured just fine with the lens combination above

This little clip was taken with a Panasonic LX7 and the +16 combo (the panasonic has less magnification than the S100 so things will look bigger)

http://youtu.be/JYDVDKzMzmo?t=4m2s


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#8 dpaustex

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 11:52 AM

I shoot super-macro with a 5D Mk III in an Aquatica housing, with two large Ikelite strobes. You position the strobes immediately on either side of the housing (to start), then work them around, depending on the effect you desire (shadowing, back-lighting, etc.). Have some examples at www.DavidPriceImages.com.

To shoot the larger-than-life stuff, you either need extension tubes, or an external diopter.

 

With extension tubes, you have no autofocus (it is literally a gap between your lens and the camer body). With a diopter, they are generally "wet", meaning they go on the outside of your port, and are often in a hinged holder, that will swing the lens out of the way when not in use (Xit 404, Subsee, and many other make them). The diopters (like SubSee, SMC, etc.) fit into this holder. The diopters range from +5 all the way up to +17.

 

You can also use a diopter directly on your lens, inside the port (if it will fit). The main drawback is you have to shoot everything with the diopter, as it's mounted directly to the lens.

 

Autofocus becomes an issue with a diopter, as  your depth-of-field gets very small. The way most people do it is to use "focus lock" and get the image close, then move the camera very slightly back-and-forth until the image is tack sharp. Be warned, however, that if you have a dioper adjustment wheel on your camera's eyepiece, that your image may not "actually" be sharp. Best to set everything up and test in a pool, first, to make sure everything that appears sharp in your viewfinder, actually is sharp once you get the image off the memory card.

 

Hope the above helps.