Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

New EM-10 Shots


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 smk82

smk82

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts

Posted 16 July 2014 - 09:51 AM

141307_0218_zps4d85854a.jpg

 

141207_0405_zps857a0c19.jpg

 

141307_0241_zps6acdc0a8.jpg

 

141307_0266_zpsa81ef030.jpg

 

141407_0095_edited-1_zps2f7e620a.jpg141407_0102_edited-1_zps0170657b.jpg

 

141407_0167_edited-1_zpse5514e9e.jpg

 

All are uncropped/edited (apart from the last one). These are taken with Olympus EM-10 in Nauticam Na-EM10 Housing with 14-42mm EZ lens, Twin z240 strobes. 



#2 FanchGadjo

FanchGadjo

    Moray Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 88 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:00 AM

Thank you for sharing picture with this new setup. Lighting and image quality

are good. I really like the tompot blenny, but you should work on your composition.



#3 smk82

smk82

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts

Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:50 PM

I know i do need to work on that. I was more concerned on this trip checking everything was working and getting used to the camera. Still - will keep trying!

#4 FanchGadjo

FanchGadjo

    Moray Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 88 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:56 PM

I guess everything is working great ! Good luck ! ;)

#5 tdpriest

tdpriest

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Solihull, UK
  • Interests:Diving medicine, warm water, scenery...

Posted 18 July 2014 - 02:47 AM

How are you focussing and composing your images? Your wide-angle subjects are a little small in the frame, your macro subjects in unappealing positions. The exposure is spot on, although once or twice the background seems to be in focus rather than the subject.

 

I only got a handle on this sort of thing when I began to shoot slowly and concentrate on one or two subjects (largely inspired by diving on one of Alex Mustard's workshops), taking time to look at the viewfinder and being really careful about the focus point within the image. It's always hard in temperate (i.e. cold!) water, with currents and swell, but working shallow sites with a subject in mind beforehand helps with pushing up the learning curve.



#6 smk82

smk82

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts

Posted 18 July 2014 - 08:23 AM

I haven't been using a dedicated wide angle or macro lens yet (still saving!), so have been making do with the 14-42mm EZ lens which came with the camera. It means that I can't do true WA or macro due to the focusing distances (i.e. if I get too close the camera won't focus on the macro end). I've been using TTL although I only got it working correctly on a couple of those shots - not the john dory one unfortunately. I would have loved to get a better picture, but they tend to be rather skittish, and were just hovering over a sandy bottom about 1" off, making any kind of interesting composition problematic at best.. 



#7 tdpriest

tdpriest

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Solihull, UK
  • Interests:Diving medicine, warm water, scenery...

Posted 19 July 2014 - 03:43 AM

... not the john dory one unfortunately...

 

It's more than I've ever managed!

 

I would think about manual strobe settings when you're happy with the set-up. I think that the expense of more lenses to get closer will really pay off: I believe that being too far away explains what I see as imperfections in your images.

 

As for getting close to fish: patience, patience, patience and as few bubbles as possible (Alex Mustard also says not to eat their relatives)...



#8 smk82

smk82

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts

Posted 19 July 2014 - 03:52 AM

Lol:) they are the first john dorys which i've seen *alive that is) in 14 years of diving, so any.shot is a good one for me.. im sure the lenses will help. Cant decide what to save for first -WA or macro..