Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Lesions on surgeonfish


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Alex_Mustard

Alex_Mustard

    The Doctor

  • Super Mod
  • 8376 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peterborough

Posted 29 March 2005 - 01:27 PM

Diving today I noticed that several, but not all of the surgeonfish on one dive site had lesions on their bodies. Any ideas on the cause?

None of the other fish seemed to have these marks - and I haven't noticed yet it at any other dive sites.

The pictures aren't the best because I was shooting rear curtain synch fish shots for most of the dive.

Alex

Attached Images

  • CY0585.jpg
  • CY0587.jpg
  • CY0587a.jpg

Alexander Mustard - www.amustard.com - www.magic-filters.com
Nikon D4 (Subal housing). Nikon D7100 (Subal housing). Olympus EPL-5 (Nauticam housing).


#2 Alex_Mustard

Alex_Mustard

    The Doctor

  • Super Mod
  • 8376 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peterborough

Posted 29 March 2005 - 01:28 PM

IF I see more I will take some clearer photos. Alex

Alexander Mustard - www.amustard.com - www.magic-filters.com
Nikon D4 (Subal housing). Nikon D7100 (Subal housing). Olympus EPL-5 (Nauticam housing).


#3 Tom_Kline

Tom_Kline

    Great Hammerhead

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 755 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Alaska
  • Interests:fishes and invertebrates

Posted 29 March 2005 - 02:09 PM

The close-up reminds me of scars I have seen left by parasitic copepods - guilty party still present. No wonder cleaning stations are so popular. Good luck finding some better shots, you may need to use longer focal lengths.
Tom

Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Canon EOS-1Ds MkII and MkIII and Nikon D1X, D2X, D2H cameras. Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 180mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 150D and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.
www.flickr.com/photos/tomkline/

 

 


#4 Rocha

Rocha

    Salty Dog

  • Senior Moderator
  • 3073 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA

Posted 29 March 2005 - 02:50 PM

Parasite scars was also my first guess, but I don't remember ever seeing a surgeonfish with attached copepod parasites. That's really weird.

Luiz Rocha - www.luizrocha.com
Nikon D800, Aquatica AD800, Ikelite strobes.


#5 Giles

Giles

    International Supermodel

  • Moderator
  • 2618 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cayman Islands
  • Interests:water and sun my friend, thats what turns me on.

Posted 29 March 2005 - 03:57 PM

Alex we have fish like that on Cheeseburger reef .. we had assumed hurricane damage from being thrown around into the coral.

I don't know anyone that knows for sure.

I would have said that is quite a bit of scar tissue for parasite from the normal stuff I see in Cayman. But we definately have not only Tang but also Bermuda Chubs with damage like this on cheeseburger.

I'm no expert and dopn't have any piccies but maybe the fact that it is elsewhere helps.

PS it's not all the fish it is just about 1 in 10 and all on cheeseburger not at the Cali or the shallower patch reef.
me on the web >> journal / flickr / portfolio
i use >> my camera, eye & stunning good looks

#6 Tom_Kline

Tom_Kline

    Great Hammerhead

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 755 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Alaska
  • Interests:fishes and invertebrates

Posted 29 March 2005 - 06:38 PM

I should add that my observations have been in rather northern waters. Copepods are quite common on salmon. Nevertheless, I recall seeing them also in published pix, esp. on dorsal fins of sharks, from lower latitudes. Lamprey scars look a bit like that too.
Tom

Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Canon EOS-1Ds MkII and MkIII and Nikon D1X, D2X, D2H cameras. Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 180mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 150D and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.
www.flickr.com/photos/tomkline/

 

 


#7 Alex_Mustard

Alex_Mustard

    The Doctor

  • Super Mod
  • 8376 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peterborough

Posted 30 March 2005 - 04:27 AM

My first thougts were the same as Tom's that they look like parasite or lamprey scars. There do seem to be more parasitic cymothoid isopods about at the moment. I have seen the on Soldierfish, yellow stingray, cardinalfish and graysby already this week. But none of the affected surgeonfish had anything attached to them - making me think that it was an internal infection.

I don't think that they are physical injuries from the hurricane because they are all too similar in size and I didn't notice them in January.

Alex

Alexander Mustard - www.amustard.com - www.magic-filters.com
Nikon D4 (Subal housing). Nikon D7100 (Subal housing). Olympus EPL-5 (Nauticam housing).