Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Gland to Control Shaft o-rings


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Paco_Barroso

Paco_Barroso

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 28 August 2005 - 06:31 PM

Have any of you ever replaced the o-rings for the control shafts inside the Glands of your housing?

I have an Ikelite SLR housing and I'm planning to replace the O-rings for all the control shafts inside the glands. I have ordered them directly from Ikelite. I guess it should not be difficult, but would like confirmation from some of you out there who may have done it before me.

Regards

Paco

Attached Images

  • ikelite1.jpg


#2 jcclink

jcclink

    Great Hammerhead

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 742 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego

Posted 28 August 2005 - 07:29 PM

It should be pretty straight forward. Just make sure not to use anything that might scratch the housing when removing the o-rings. (Not sure if o-rings are on control shaft or in housing bore for Ike.) Done it several times with aluminum housings. Recommend a dynamic pressure test after replacement of seals. Take it on a dive to at least 30ft (I usually go 50-60ft), & move all the controls several times - rotate, push/pull- however they move.
Nexus D300, 10-17mm, 12-24mm, 17-55mm, 60mm, 105mm VR
S&S YS110's & YS27's

#3 Kelpfish

Kelpfish

    Giant Squid

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1602 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 29 August 2005 - 03:54 PM

I've done several housings and some have so many small clips and springs that I leave it up to the manufacturer to RR the o-rings and pressure test. I will say that sending the housing in can take time. I called Light & Motion to get an RMA for my housing to get a standard service and it was $250 and a turn-around of 2 months.....yes, 2 months. I could have gotten it back sooner for another $100. What a scam. I will send it to another service facility. But be sure that you are fully comfortable with removing shafts with spring loads and tight alignment characteristics.

Good luck.


Joe
Joe Belanger
Author, Catalina Island - All you Need to Know
www.californiaunderwater.com
www.visitingcatalina.com

#4 Paco_Barroso

Paco_Barroso

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 05 September 2005 - 07:33 PM

Well.... It is done.... got the o-rings... took the old out very very carefully and replaced them with new ones.... All my controls are nice and snug now...and with the aid of a little bit of Ikelite silicone lubricant they glide nicely inside their glands.

I learned however, that these rings are not really o-rings, they are called X-rings and aparently are some kind of proprietary technology from ikelite, they have a totally diferent shape....

Any way.... my refurbishing project is complete.... I'll let you guys know how it went as soon as I can take it deep under water

#5 Marc Furth

Marc Furth

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 366 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida
  • Interests:Do it yourself afficionado

Posted 10 September 2005 - 09:50 PM

[QUOTE]I learned however, that these rings are not really o-rings, they are called X-rings and aparently are some kind of proprietary technology from ikelite, they have a totally diferent shape....



X-Ring or Quad Rings are not proprietary technology from IkeLite.

X-Rings, also known as Quad-Rings can be used in a wide variety of static and dynamic sealing applications.

The four-lobed design provides twice the sealing surface in comparison to a standard o-ring. The double-seal action requires less squeeze to maintain an effective seal. This reduction in squeeze means less friction and improved seal life.

X-Ring parting lines are between the lobes, away from the sealing surface, thus eliminating the problems of leakage often resulting from a parting line's irregular surface as found on an O-Ring.

X-Rings are designed to outperform a standard O-Ring in rotary seal applications. The four-lobed configuration creates a more stable seal avoiding spiral twisting.

It's always a good practise to lightly coat the X-Rings with silicone before you replace them, a light sheen will do.

Marc
Nikon D3, 16mm Nikkor,14-24 Nikkor,24-70 Nikkor, Sigma 15 mm New DIY housing,Nikon D2x, DIY housing, Ikelite Strobe 400's, twin iTTL housed Sb 800's, Sigma 14 mm, Tamron 90 mm, Nikkor 80-400 VR, Nikkor 18-200 VR, Tamron 180 mm macro, Epson Pro 4800 printer.

#6 Paco_Barroso

Paco_Barroso

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 11 September 2005 - 08:23 PM

Thanks for the clarification. So much to learn, too little time...

#7 Chris Bangs

Chris Bangs

    Sting Ray

  • Industry
  • PipPipPip
  • 207 posts
  • Location:Japan/Guam

Posted 11 October 2005 - 06:56 PM

[quote name='Marc Furth' date='Sep 11 2005, 02:50 PM']
[QUOTE]I learned however, that these rings are not really o-rings, they are called X-rings and aparently are some kind of proprietary technology from ikelite, they have a totally diferent shape....
X-Ring or Quad Rings are not proprietary technology from IkeLite.

X-Rings, also known as Quad-Rings can be used in a wide variety of static and dynamic sealing applications.

The four-lobed design provides twice the sealing surface in comparison to a standard o-ring. The double-seal action requires less squeeze to maintain an effective seal. This reduction in squeeze means less friction and improved seal life.

X-Ring parting lines are between the lobes, away from the sealing surface, thus eliminating the problems of leakage often resulting from a parting line's irregular surface as found on an O-Ring.

X-Rings are designed to outperform a standard O-Ring in rotary seal applications. The four-lobed configuration creates a more stable seal avoiding spiral twisting.

It's always a good practise to lightly coat the X-Rings with silicone before you replace them, a light sheen will do.

Marc

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

[/quote]

Damn, you beat me to it! Used to be in the O-ring Biz!
Nikon D70s,Fuji S2, And Misc Nikon/Nikonos film gear collecting dust.
Ikelite and Aquatica Housings
Nikon 12-24 mm, 10.5 mm, 16 mm, 60 mm, 105 mm, 200 mm micro. Sigma 14 mm. + stacks of diopters and teleconverters
Many outdated flashy thingys with aluminum tinker toys to connect them to the cameras.