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scotdiver

Member Since 02 Nov 2003
Offline Last Active Dec 05 2014 05:58 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Shark Humor

22 September 2011 - 09:30 PM

Thanks for getting the day started with a smile :-)

In Topic: Question on shooting Macro video of foraminifera

21 September 2011 - 03:59 AM

I would suggest trying to get your hands on John Shaw's 1987 book - Closeups in Nature. I've just seen it secondhand on Amazon 2.69 here in the UK. He has many options but using his directions for stacked lenses P112 should give you the workable high magnifications you are looking for using an aquarium and the 7d. You will need a reversing ring to link the lenses, and perhaps a step up ring for one of the lenses if they do not have the same filter sizes.

The magnification obtained is 1000mm divided by the focal length of the front reversed lens. So a 50mm stacked on a 100mm lens will give you 1000/50 or a 20x magnification.

I would also look at using the smallest aquariums available for the filming and use the larger aquarium as a keep tank. Try creating a small aquarium with microscope slides sealed with silicon at the edges, and a moveable slide inside to confine the object being filmed. A watch glass suspended on a ring of plasticine / modelling clay will also allow you a shallow depth for the specimen and the ability to light from behind as well.

Black velvet suspended in front of the aquarium with a hole to shoot through will also cut down on reflections. Camera on a tripod, and the aquarium on the heaviest table /surface you can find. I remember reading somewhere that Oxford Scientific Films had special granite tables built for their super macro filming.

Cheers
Rob

In Topic: newbie looking for new water/shockproof camcorder of camera

03 September 2011 - 02:24 AM

... what about the sites over the other side of the island?


Tim

Nice pic of Double Arch, but I don't think 36 meters, housed DSLR and Strobe fits with the Junior Open Water Diver, and camera to 30 feet question of the original post :-)

When are you planning your next Gozo holiday?

There is quite a cadre of underwater photographers building on Gozo now.

Folk like Pete Bullen, and Richard Salter who are also out there most of the time.

Cheers
Rob

In Topic: newbie looking for new water/shockproof camcorder of camera

29 August 2011 - 05:24 AM

The best one out now is the panasonic ts3, which is within your budget if you shop around.


Ben
Funnily enough, I've just been looking at replacing the compact cameras used on my photo courses out here in Gozo and was seriously considering moving away from housed compacts to these wee rugged all-in-ones. My favourite was also the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FT3 (european version) though I still have some doubts about how rugged they are. Should be testing a sample towards the end of October. The 12m limit would not be a problem as it is easy to maintain that depth or shallower in my main teaching site in Xlendi Bay.

Also any practice dives you can grab to get your buoyancy up to speed will also help when you come to shoot.

And in the words of the famous photographer Robert Capa, "If your picture isn't good enough, you're not close enough."

Cheers
Rob

In Topic: Mediterranean blues

29 August 2011 - 04:45 AM

Just came across the thread. My fault for not keeping up to speed with the forums. :-(

I tend to take the opposite view on diving the likes of the P29 in that I prefer diving from the shore. The swim out takes 12 to 15 minutes, but I use that time to reset the old brain to being underwater and to "tune in". The swim back and safety stops on the reef all add to a different set of images as well.

Competing for space on a dive boat with non photographers and trying to protect your camera rig from the occasional oaf trying to sit on top of you is way more stressful.

On the other hand - early or late season boats dives to the likes of Comino Caves can be very rewarding with a big camera rig.

Cheers
Rob