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MortenHansen

Member Since 29 Mar 2012
Offline Last Active Nov 06 2014 04:29 AM
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#344656 Diving in Bali, Indonesia

Posted by MortenHansen on 18 March 2014 - 10:58 AM

Hi all,

 

A short 5min video about diving in Kubu, Amed, Tulamben and Nusa Penida. 

 

www.vimeo.com/89384150

 

I hope you will enjoy it, I am especially happy about the pygmy seahorse shot at 1:45, took me quite a few dives to get those few seconds! :)

 

All the best, Morten




#341387 New to Underwater Photography

Posted by MortenHansen on 04 January 2014 - 12:25 AM

Dear MMPower,

 

I must agree with the previous poster, these are great first images!

 

My first images were, well, horrendous! :)

 

As it has already been said, the exposure is good and so is the sharpness, where you need some work is your composition.

 

Luckily there are plenty of resources out there to learn!  

 

In the end composition is of course completely up to you, if you like naturalist type pictures, go for it, if you want to take the artistic way thats cool as well, you just have to start thinking about shots before you take them, how you can take a unique and interesting picture of your subject that will make it pop.

 

Simply google "underwater photography composition" and you will have material enough to read for hours! :) 

 

I will often draw out a picture of my subject before I even hit the water, if I go in with a specific plan in mind I will get 50% more keepers than when I just jump in and shoot away. 

 

Keep at it, you've got a headstart on a lot of us! 

 

All the best, Morten




#333237 Soft/grainy images

Posted by MortenHansen on 22 June 2013 - 01:07 AM

I'd have to agree with the other guys, you have to get closer, a lot closer, with a focal range of 40mm its tempting to just zoom in rather than get as close as possible (without damaging the environment of course). The 17-40L is a pretty awesome lens, and you should be able to get some real crackers with it, just have a bit of a google around, a lot of great pictures were taken underwater with this lens. 

 

I would recommend that you wait a little before you go out and buy new lens, extensions and possibly a new dome, if your buoyancy is so that you cant get close enough with the 17-40, then a new lens (fisheye) is only gonna make the subject smaller in your picture, a new lens is not going to help on your buoyancy control.

 

Make sure you have excellent buoyancy skills and then see what you think if your 17-40, if you are feeling that you can't get close enough because of the minimum close focus of the 17-40, then you can change your setup, but if its because of bouyancy then it doesn't make much sense.

 

It might be a good idea to go with your local dive club to the pool, bring your camera, and practice there once a week (you don't have to do a course to learn it but if you have a good instructor who knows about photography then it can sometimes help) after a few sessions you should be getting the hang of it! 

 

Anyways, thats my 2 pennies worth, and as Tim said, it could be a whole lot worse! :)  




#332694 How essential is a wide-angle lens for a newb?

Posted by MortenHansen on 11 June 2013 - 10:33 PM

Hi again Opie! 

 

Wide-angle lenses are great for underwater because you can get closer to your subject and still keep the whole animal/reef in the frame! 

 

They are however pretty expensive, and if you never took photos before then I would say start with something simple, the Canon housing for the S95 is also fine, the wideangle lens is great, but you have to learn how to take pictures first, then you can get more gadgets :) 




#330258 Good news for Sharks in New Caledonia

Posted by MortenHansen on 25 April 2013 - 05:23 AM

Damon, on this one we agree! :) 

 

Either way, great news for New Caledonian sharks! 




#329737 Critique appreciated

Posted by MortenHansen on 15 April 2013 - 12:57 AM

Just a quick idea, when shooting stationary subjects such as lionfish you do not need fast flash recycle times, so here is what I suggest: 

 

Put your flash on full power (or at least somewhat higher power) and increase your aperture to get a deeper depth of field. 

 

Another thing, maybe consider warming your strobes somewhat, use a Lee Straw filter and put it on the front of your strobe, this will give you a pleasing foreground color (as you already have) but a much better blue background color! :) 

 

-Morten




#329004 GoPro - Diving the Oil Rigs

Posted by MortenHansen on 02 April 2013 - 12:40 PM

Nice video, Looks like a pond out there!

 

I especially enjoyed the Zeppelin part! :) 

 

-Morten 




#328617 Thailand live aboard North or South Andaman sea in November / December

Posted by MortenHansen on 26 March 2013 - 01:14 AM

I would go North, higher diversity of sites, I personally could spend a week on Richelieu Rock.

 

South has some good sites (Hin Daeng, Hin Muang, Koh Ha) but in my experience they get better in spring-time, then the whalesharks and mantas seem to appear more frequently. 

 

Have fun,

-Morten




#326009 Norwegian nudibranches

Posted by MortenHansen on 11 February 2013 - 01:33 AM

Great images, quick question, does the nudibranchs in Norway swim around a lot?


#325549 A great day at Manta-Point in Bali

Posted by MortenHansen on 03 February 2013 - 04:45 AM

A total of 10 mantas and excellent visibility!

This whole videography thing is new to me so feedback would be welcome!

[vimeo]58812817[/vimeo]

I can't seem to get the embed-code working, does anyone know what is wrong with the above "code"?

For now, here is a link instead! :)



Hope you enjoy!
-Morten


#324487 Inon Z240 Color Temperature Conversion Filter / diffuser

Posted by MortenHansen on 15 January 2013 - 12:27 AM

I thought the hue of the blue in underwater is adjusted in camera settings f-stop/shutter speed, e.g sunburst shots etc.

The exposure- fstop/shutter/iso controls the exposure of your background- not the color. However, if you severely overexposure your background colors will be washed out, the background should normally be a little underexposed to bring out the colors that are determined by your white-balance.

Think of it like this, there is only one "acceptable" color for your foreground, the realistic color.
If I put on a warming filter and keep the same white-balance as I do without the filter, then the foreground will be way too warm and the water will be the same color as before.

The white-balance can only make global changes on your image, either your entire image is warmed by the white-balance, or the entire image is cooled by the whitebalance.

So imagine you have an image with a really warm foreground and a pretty dull (not blue) background (taken with filters).
Now we use the kelvin slider in your RAW processing program to turn the entire image colder.
This means that the foreground which was too warm will now be the correct color, but your dull background, not lit by your strobe will become colder and colder, giving you a nice blue background without making your subject cold as well.

I use lee straw filters, when I do wide-angle dives I bring a total of 8 filters with me, 4 for each strobe.

2 yellow'ish and 2 red'ish. In the beginning of the dive I put on what I think will be appropriate, if its sunny and clear water you wont need as many as if its overcast and murky.
I set my whitebalance to Kelvin and play around, once I have found a pleasing color, background and foreground, then I start shooting!

On my first few dives with this I took some notes on which filters I should use for which conditions, and which white-balance I should set for which filters and now, after maybe 5-6 dives playing around it comes naturally, just like you sort of know which exposure to set when you imagine your shot.

Hope you can make sense of the above!

Happy (blue) bubbles, Morten!


#324163 Best BCD for New Underwater Photographers

Posted by MortenHansen on 10 January 2013 - 08:56 AM

A good friend of mine does all of his camera diving on side-mount and he says its nice, he only does wide-angle, I could imagine that its really hard to stay clear of the bottom while doing macro shots though. If you can't dive perfectly with normal back-mount then I don't think starting to play around with side-mount will be a good idea.

-Morten


#324150 My first underwater video, feedback would be great!

Posted by MortenHansen on 09 January 2013 - 11:15 PM

Thanks a bunch Paul, glad you liked it! :)
The length is an issue, I guess especially for internet, I made it to loop in the diving center and thats why I wanted to put in a bit more material so if someone was sitting doing logbooks or whatever they would most likely not see the same footage twice.

John, it was shot with a Canon 7D, 100mm USM, 60mm USM, Tokina 10-17, in Aquatica housing. The wide-angle shots were made with manual white balance, the macro shots were lit up with the focus lights from my strobes (D2000 & Z240).

I know, I really need to get some video lights but my girlfriend insists that if I buy 1 more piece of camera gear she is allowed to buy 3 pairs of shoes.. :P

Does anyone have any other advice on how I can improve my video skills?

Thanks a lot, Morten


#324120 My first underwater video, feedback would be great!

Posted by MortenHansen on 09 January 2013 - 01:21 PM

Hi everyone!

Finally I put together a little video with some shots done in and around Tulamben!

The video was done for putting on our tv in the diving center, thats why there is some Bali/resort intro/outro stuff in there as well Posted Image

This is my first video so please feel free to give some feedback!

Enjoy,
-Morten

[vimeohd]57081976[/vimeohd]




#323999 a couple of questions regarding 7d lenses and possilbe OM D

Posted by MortenHansen on 07 January 2013 - 12:13 PM

I think the 6" dome will be great, as far as I understand Its not always a case of the bigger the better.
I should probably mention that I am by no means an expert in dome-port optics but what I know is that the length of your extension ring (ring that goes between housing and dome) is extremely important for overall sharpness/ability to focus (see the lens chart).

I always shoot with the 10-17 and a very small 4" dome and I love it, because of the strong curvature of the small dome you do get unsharp image corners at high apertures. If you want to have the corners tack sharp then you need to stop down to f.8 or lower, but then again, how important is it really that the corners are totally 100% sharp?
Hehe, think of that gorgeous shark over-under shot with the one eye above the surface, teeth clearly showing, almost bumping the dome with his snout, while the sun is setting in the background, now tell me if you really care about having tack-sharp corners :P

As far as I can see, the only major disadvantage of using a small dome such as my 4" mini-dome is that over-unders are basically impossible to get right, for that you need a bigger dome, I believe a 8" or even a 9,5" is preferred by most.
With a 8" or 9,5" dome of course then it would be impossible/very hard to get close-focus-wide-angle shots of critters :/
It seems there is never a perfect choice that is great for everything but I guess the 6" dome is a good choice to start out with! :)

Happy bubbles, Morten