Jump to content


smk82

Member Since 28 Aug 2013
Offline Last Active Today, 04:44 AM
-----

Posts I've Made

In Topic: For sale Olympus OMD EM1/ Nauticam set up

19 December 2014 - 03:10 AM

What price would you look at selling just the olympus 60mm?

In Topic: Wide Lens recommendations for Olympus EM5 for temperate / cold water locations

04 December 2014 - 02:46 AM

Thanks smk82

Glad you are seeing a better result from the 9-18. The fisheye appears great in 'perfect' conditions but I can only blame my inexperience with the lens so far. I am thinking it would be a true pleasure to use in crystal tropical waters
Have you used the 9-18 for video or mostly stills?

Regards

Adam

I use it mostly for stills, I don't have video lights on my rig so haven't attempted video shoots with it yet. I agree that the fisheye and 7-14 are great lens, and shots from them look brilliant in excellent conditions. However in UK waters, there is such rapid change in the conditions day to day, you can never guarantee that you'll get 10m plus and very little particulate in the water (especially the last year or so!). I chose the 9-18 as it would give me a reasonably wide angle (not as good as the fish-eye/7-14), but sufficient, zoom capability,  the most cost effective choice and the lens/port combo was fairly light. Looking at the options for the 7-14 the dome is comparatively large and bulky (compared to the 9-14 4" dome) and whilst the fisheye is smaller, there is no zoom option.


In Topic: Wide Lens recommendations for Olympus EM5 for temperate / cold water locations

28 November 2014 - 02:53 PM

I dive in the uk, frequently in 6-8m viz, although it can often be worse. I had a similar dilemma, but in the end i went for the 9-18mm for my immediate needs. Mainly because it gives zoom options unlike the 8mm fisheye but also it can cope better with less ideal conditions i feel..

In Topic: Dry Suits - How to?

17 October 2014 - 05:25 AM

I never use my wing when diving a drysuit. Two bouyant elements on one dive is asking for chaos in an emergency. If you're properly weighted there shouldn't be too much air in the drysuit: if you have to add air to the BCD it suggests that you are over-weighted or wearing too little insulation, allowing the air to form a bubble instead of distributing evenly around your body. Having my bouyancy distributed evenly, and only worrying about one inflator (I use an APEX adjustable dump valve on my left bicep) helps me to concentrate on my camera. I do find that a little weight on my ankles and trim weights on my wing help, with the balance in pouches: I hate weight-belts!

Personal choice this. I find no issue with keeping a track of my buoyancy using both drysuit and wing. As I said I only use suffcient in the drysuit to take off the squeeze. Main reason is if I loose buoyancy for some reason, it won't be all my buoyancy. I agree that shallow drysuit dives are more awkward than deeper ones. Doing it while just learning makes it more difficult still!. Ankle weights are definitely useful when doing photography!


In Topic: Dry Suits - How to?

13 October 2014 - 01:08 AM

Typically, I use my wing for buoyancy, and just take the squeeze off with the drysuit. I normally open all valves on descent, then when I'm almost at the bottom shut the drysuit constant volume dump valve (autodump), then open 1/2 turn. I put enough air in as I descent to take of the squeeze, but then regulate my depth on the wing. Make sure your zip is well lubricated, and doesn't catch on the undergarments, and don't pull directly on the neck/wrist seals especially if they are latex - my friend was in a hurry to dive once and did just that - result - ripped neck seal and a missed dive for him.

 

It shouldn't take you more than a couple of dives to get used to it, just make sure that you do a weight check with the new suit as it will affect your buoyancy, especially if your wearing a thick undersuit..