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SlipperyDick

Member Since 19 Mar 2007
Offline Last Active Dec 21 2013 03:55 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: +10 Wetdiopter instead of SubSea?

18 March 2013 - 10:27 AM

NOTE: The Aquatica +10 diopter lens is a 2 element achromat (as far as I can tell - but correct me if I'm wrong, Jean), while the SubSee +10 is a 4 element achromatic system. Spreading the +10 dioptric strength over more elements allows significantly less edge distortion to be present.

 

Keri


In Topic: Super macro diopter ... Aquatica vs SubSee

15 October 2012 - 09:08 AM

KirkD - The +10 SubSee is 200g in water and the +5 SubSee is 140g in water. On land, they are 345g and 240g, respectively.

The new SubSee adapters do not use a set screw design like in the past (or like the Aquatica mounts). Instead, we use a circumferential o-ring clamp system, which applies an even pressure around the entire port, holding it in place much tighter than ever before.

In the worst case, when using a dual-hinge adapter with both the +5 and +10 lenses installed, it will add approximately 0.75lb to the rig. I don't often hear people complain about this, but you could certainly add a float belt around the port to compensate.

Keri
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Keri Wilk | ReefNet Inc. | www.reefnet.ca | 888-819-REEF or 905-608-9373

In Topic: Super macro diopter ... Aquatica vs SubSee

14 October 2012 - 12:27 PM

Since one of Aquatica's salesmen is on here backing them up, I think it's only fair that I chime in on this topic as well (designer/manufacturer of the SubSee lenses).

IQ wise, there would be no difference really with the Subsee or Aquatica diopters.


I understand your motivation to downplay competing products, but this statement is not true. The SubSee +10 is a 4-element achromatic lens system, while the Aquatica +10 is a 2-element achromat. By using 2 more lens elements, we are able to use less steeply curved surfaces, resulting in lower levels of edge distortion than most regular doublets can achieve alone (excluding aspherics, which are prohibitively expensive). Since we opted for the highest image quality possible, the +10 SubSee was indeed forced to be larger than previous versions of the SubSee and Aquatica's new lens.

I have both the Aquatica and the Subsee diopters.


I'd be interested to see some test shots against a grid with both SubSee and Aquatica lenses. If you feel like sharing your results, I'm sure the community would find that beneficial.

Keri
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Keri Wilk | ReefNet Inc. | www.reefnet.ca | 888-819-REEF or 905-608-9373

In Topic: WETPIXEL Whalesharks - 2012

08 August 2012 - 01:20 PM

Ryan had housings for the Nikon D800, Nikon D4, Canon 5DMk3 and Olympus OM-D E-M5.


Classic overcompensation! Posted Image

Seriously though, I'm incredibly jealous of you all! Awesome shots everyone. I hope the weather clears up quickly!

I'd love to see more videos, if you've got them (anyone).

Keri

In Topic: DPG - D800 shoot in Mexico - Keri Wilk

06 May 2012 - 04:13 PM

Thanks for the comments everyone.

Just got back from Mexico a few days ago, and got a chance to go through another couple of days of images.

The housing and camera kept up with my 40-60GB of shooting each day, but my 250GB hard drives would've exploded if we stayed another couple of days - they got filled very fast! I'll be taking this system to Fiji and Curacao for the rest of May to do a proper review, so will definitely need to grab a couple of bigger hard drives to keep me safe.

These shots are much different than the last set of elaborate caves, but they're still taken in cenotes (specifically, in the Aktun Ha cenote, also known as Carwash). The lilies, turtles, and small resident crocodile were all very photogenic, so I temporarily put aside the platoon of remote strobes that we brought, and shot the mini-ecosystem instead.

Here are some shots from the 2 days we had there:

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The entrance to Nahoch Nah Chich cenote. After 5 hours in the water, there was no one left to model for me, so I had to set up the camera/housing on a tripod, set the self-timer, and pose for myself. Despite looking bright and sunny, it was actually 5pm, with very dim and diffuse available light. Thankfully, the high ISO performance of the D800 is incredible, so I was able to confidently enter quadruple digit values without worrying about degrading image quality.
f/11, 1/1.3, ISO1000
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 15mm Sigma fisheye
No strobes



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Backlit lily pads.
f/11, 1/250, ISO320
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @16mm
2 YS-D1 strobes on camera at minimum power, 2 Ikelite DS-160 strobes with homemade slave triggers



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A small Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) resides in one end of the cenote called "Carwash". Although it was very small (4ft long) and shy, a few hours of persistence was all it took to get some decent shots of it.
f/9, 1/125, ISO400
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @18mm
2 YS-D1 strobes



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A silhouette of a Slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) against a clear blue sky... would've looked more interesting with some clouds! These turtles swim surprisingly fast, so when it made a break for the other side of the cenote over my head, I had to adjust exposure settings as fast as possible. The large thumb-controls for aperture and shutter speed on the NA-D800 made this quick and easy, and a lever just above the eyepiece was used to put down the the pop-up flash (essentially "turning off" the strobes, using fiber optic sync cables).
f/14, 1/125, ISO200
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @35mm
No strobes



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Matt Weiss posing at the entrance of a cenote.
f/8, 1/250, ISO200
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 15mm Sigma fisheye
No strobes



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Lilies in the Carwash cenote extend to within inches of the surface, but never seems to reach it.
f/9, 1/125, ISO400
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @16mm
No strobes


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DivePhotoGuide.com's publisher, Matt Weiss, shooting a Slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) swimming over a lily patch.
f/8, 1/160, ISO200
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @16mm
2 YS-D1 strobes



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The lily pads are a drab orange/yellow on top, but brilliant purple/pink from below. I cranked the shutter speed to the max, and the aperture was narrowed as far as possible while still allowing the pair of YS-D1s to sufficiently illuminate the undersides of the pads.
f/14, 1/320, ISO200
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @16mm
2 YS-D1 strobes



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A Slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) cruising through midwater. Every photographer that I show this to says that the animal looks superimposed. (it wasn't!)
f/10, 1/125, ISO400
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @16mm
2 YS-D1 strobes



Attached File  DSC_3422a.jpg   47.29KB   110 downloads
Trying to evade me, this mohawk-wearing turtle made a kamikaze dive into an algae bed. A few seconds later, it poked its head out to see if the coast was clear. It was not.
f/14, 1/50, ISO200
Nauticam NA-D800, Zen 230 dome, 16-35mm Nikon @35mm
2 YS-D1 strobes




Keri