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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/09/12 in Posts

  1. 8 points
    (28-60+WWL-1B) With Strobes: And finally, a few shots taken with strobes using the WWL-1B. The frogfish is an adult nearly the size of a dinner plate.
  2. 7 points
    Just wanted to share and discuss with other video shooters using A7SIII. Until this trip I have been shooting always in SLOG3, however for this last weekend I tweaked a HLG profile and shot exclusively with that. I found it fine to use, although colours can be a bit odd to my eye. Always keen to hear from and learn other Sony shooters settings for underwater video. Enjoying the process. All shot in 4K 4:2:2 10 bit, 60fps, PP10, HLG, with A7SIII, 28mm F2 inside WWL-1, using a combination of nitescuba NSV80 lights which I'm currently testing, and my existing Keldan lights.
  3. 7 points
    I recently got the Nauticam A7SIII housing to shoot video and am very happy with it, shooting with the 28mm F2 and WWL-1 that I bought on this forum from @Phil Rudin I just tested the Sony A1 in the same housing today, thoroughly checked all buttons, dials, etc and wanted to just share to anyone who needs to know, the A1 works perfectly in A7SIII housing. I know for the Nauticam A1 housing they sell the adaptor tray for the A7S3, but this is not required if you have the A7S3 housing.
  4. 7 points
    Wolfgang sent me a PM and asked me to comment on my experience with the AF performance of the Sony A7RIV and Sony 90 macro and the Canon 100 macro on Canon dSLR. I was a long term Canon dSLR user (20D, 40D, 50D, 7D, 7DMkII and 5DMkIII) all with the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro. Just over a year ago I changed to Sony A7RIV. Initially I used the Canon 100 macro on the Sony with a Metabones adapter but changed to the Sony 90 macro after 3 months. My wife still uses my 7DMkII with the Canon 100 macro so I was able to compare all combinations of camera/macro lens possible just now. Room was dimly lit. Results varied based on what focus point setup I used on each camera/lens. With all focus points in play and cameras set to AI Servo (Canon) AF-C (Sony) the winner in grabbing focus quickly was the 7DMkII/Canon 100 macro with the A7RIV/Sony 90 macro a very close second (it was occasionally faster than the Canon). The A7RIV/Metabones/Canon 100 macro was a distant third (Which is why I got the 90 macro 12 months ago when I did the same test). When I changed to my preferred mode of shooting with each camera - AI Servo with Expand AF (Canon) and AF-C and Tracking Flexible Spot (Sony) - things changed. The A7RIV/Sony 90 macro was first grabbing focus fastest and holding it better than the 7DMkII which came a close second. The A7RIV/Metabones/Canon 100 macro came third. Points to consider: Before I switched to Sony the 7DMkII was by far the best low light focussing camera I had ever used. Depending on how you set up the autofocus system the A7RIV is better than the 7DMkII with their respective native macro lenses The effect of the Metabones adapter on focus performance will differ from lens to lens. While the Canon 100 macro is slower on the Metabones adapter my Canon 8-15 fisheye (for which there is no Sony equivalent) focusses much faster with the Metabones adapter on the A7RIV than it did on the 7DMkII.
  5. 6 points
    I replied to someone heading to Socorro in another thread, but I decided this topic was worth its own thread, since so many people struggle with this issue. Since I started shooting video underwater, I've been bedeviled by the mixed light problem. Years ago, few cameras apart from Canon DSLRs could dream of being able to white balance at depth. Then, along came the Panasonic GH5, and slowly camera makers followed suit. But what about supplemental light? The problem is that when you're white balanced at depth, the output of 5600K video lights look red. If you white balance to 5600K to match your lights, then the ambient color looks terrible. And unlike strobes, almost video lights almost never have the sheer power to overwhelm daylight enough to get good color unless you're very close to the subject. What you really want is nice ambient white balance, and supplemental light that looks "normal", i.e., like natural light at depth. The secret is to white balance for the ambient light at depth, then adjust your video lights so their output matches the ambient light color temperature. That way, you get a nice, colorful ambient light exposure, with a little more light on things close by to bring out detail and color, but without any weird color casts. For example, consider filming sharks. Ambient light only with a good white balance may look good when filming them from the side, but when the animal swims over you, it becomes a silhouette. It's alot nicer to throw some light onto the shark's belly so you can see some detail. But if you add light from normal 5600K video lights, it looks all red or pink. You want it to be white. And even though you can get a nice shot of sharks from the side with ambient light only, without extra light, you miss out on the beautiful iridescent colors in their skin. With good light, you will see flecks of gold and other colors in their skin as they swim by. Around 8 years ago, Keldan released cyan heads for their original Luna 8 lights, and few people took notice. I remember then Nauticam rep Chris Parsons lamenting that he was having a hard time getting people to understand the idea of using cyan video lights to get better color underwater. After all, isn't a lack of red in underwater daylight the problem in the first place? I was an early adopter of the Keldan cyan idea, but I never could get it to work very well with my GH4 (w/red filter) or the GH5 (without red filter, as it could white balance at depth on its own) Even with the GH5 white balanced at depth, I could never get really clean whites. I was in the Revillagigedos a few weeks ago, and finally had some success getting decent ambient color with a mix of ambient and supplemental lighting. The rig was: Sony α1 Nauticam NA-α1 housing Sony FE 28-60mm F4-5.6 Nauticam WWL1-B wet lens Keldan Spectrum SF -2 red filter (a frameless filter placed between the flat port and the WWL-1B) Keldan 4X lights with SF-12 Ambient filters. I shot mostly Slog-3, but I also tried HLG. My experience was that, with Slog-3, I was at 6400-12,800 alot of the time in order to punch through the red filter and at the same time overexpose by about 2 stops required by this profile. This means quite a lot of noise, but Neat Video does a good job of cleaning it up. I shot one dive at the boiler with HLG3, and I think going forward that will be my go-to profile. You don't have to overexpose it, so noise is less of an issue. If you nail the white balance, you get very nice color and good dynamic range. But remember that you have a little less room to work with it than slog-3. Still, HLG3 grades very easily, once you drop a corrective LUT onto the clip (I use the Leeming LUTs). Once that's done, I found that only minor corrections to contrast and exposure and saturation were required. Simple corrections and easy to do. Another benefit of HLG3 is that you can use the footage later to deliver for HDR displays, if you like. Here is the workflow for HLG in Final Cut Pro. My advice is to try HLG3.BT2020 in XAVC 4K S-I at 60P, 10 bit 4.2.2 For Slog-3, I am using the Phantom LUTs, and have found that the "Ice Blue" LUT works beautifully for underwater footage. After applying the LUT, only minor corrections to contrast, saturation and exposure were needed. Just a few clicks... The Keldan system is brilliant. I was able to get nice color with ambient light at the Canyon cleaning station, where you will be at 80-90 feet. It's nice to have good ambient color and be able to put some light on the animals without the red cast. With the Keldan red filter (on your lens) and cyan filter on your lights, you get a nice clean look. I credit a deceptively simple little tool for making my life underwater alot easier. If you're serious about video, YOU MUST have a good gray card at a minimum. And a color checker is also very useful as a color reference when finishing your footage. The Keldan color checker/white balance card was INDISPENSABLE. I had it on a small retract, so I could just grab it for white balance, and I'd also sometimes flip it over to show the Xrite color checker side at the beginning of a shot. I hold it at arm's length for white balance. Really, I cannot emphasize how valuable this thing is. Don't think, just buy it and thank me later. The attached video shows my wife, Karin, photographing a silver tip at the Canyon. It was shot in slog-3, probably at about ISO 3200 or 6400, XAVC 4K S-I (600 mbps), 10bbit 4.2.2 at 60-FPS. Noise reduction with Neat Video. Keldan SF-2 red filter, and Keldan SF-12 cyan light filters on Keldan 4X compact lights. Depth was 85-90 feet, proving that the SF-2 (rated for 2-15 meters) and SF12 (rated for 10-18 meters) work well together, even beyond their respective depth ratings. Notice that the lights don't have an overly warm cast, even though at 30,000k, the light temperature is a little lower than ambient. I found the SF-2/SF-12 filter system to work well from safety stop depths all the way down to 100ft. Karin with Silvertip Graded.mp4
  6. 6 points
    last weekend we went dove the 'Flagpole' dive site in Hood canal, it is probably one of the best diving spot in that area, and behold, this easily wingspan 10 foot plus giant pacific octopus decided to come out of its den and say hi to us. absolutely once a life time experience for myself. shot on 1dx + retra strobs, WACP1 7-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 13-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 12-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 2-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 1-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr
  7. 6 points
    In November I managed to steal an adventure from and otherwise difficult 2020. After getting Covid-19 tested, keeping a temperature log and donning two masks, I ventured to the Socorro Islands for the first time with the GH5 on the Solmar V. I head read all the report of camera housings getting taxed going through customs, but we got the green light when tapping the button and all was good! Spent 8 days aboard the Solmar V with masked crew and divers. The crew was happy to be back at sea again after being shut down for months. I was happy to be back in warm water. Below is the video of the adventure.
  8. 6 points
    After many months of lockdown in which we have done everything possible to cultivate our passion for diving, finally we are back in the sea and the island of Giannutri (Italy) welcomes us in the best way. Punta Pennello shoal with its forest of black coral (Antipathes subpinnata) surrounded by forests of Paramuricea clavata and Eunicella cavolini is a riot of color and life and reminds us that the Mediterranean mesophotic coral has nothing to envy to the tropical seas. A short video by @MarcoP.
  9. 5 points
    This photograph: may not be world beating, but read on. It was taken on a Seacam housed Sony A7II at 200ISO. The lens is a manual focus which because I could not fit a gear, was fixed at one focus setting. Its focal length is 3.75" (~95mmish) at infinity and it was originally designed for stereo photography and intended to cover 3" x 3" format (75mm square) although it is not a macro lens. But what is quite extraordinary is that the lens was made my Grubb of Dublin (world renowned telescope maker) in 1865, so it is an over 150 years old photographic lens. We have come a long way but not, perhaps, quite as far as we might think. It won't stand up to absolute comparison with any modern macro lens of course, but it is quite extraordinarily good considering its age (and condition!).
  10. 5 points
    Hi, in November I have been on a liveaboard in the south of the Red Sea, afterwards i went diving from land for a week. With the necessary patience, I was able to film a lot of natural behavior. Enjoy watching! Alex,
  11. 5 points
    Some shots from where i live Place called Fethiye which is at Aegean coast of Turkey
  12. 5 points
    As far as whale shark encounters go (and I've had a few) this one was close to perfect! Just a small group of mostly camera professionals and 2 hours with a highly curious individual. He just kept circling and coming back to us for the entire 2 dives we had with it. He also seemed genuinely interested in our cameras, and would come closer to view his own reflection in our dome ports or even curiously react when he heard shutters going off. Very fun!! Here's the video, enjoy it on your largest screen
  13. 5 points
    Making good use of all the tools you have available to capture underwater video is very important, and I've come up with a list of 5 reasons why foreground elements is so essential to use for underwater videography. These are tips that can be utilized almost anywhere and it's a great set of ideas to add to your existing shot types. I hope you enjoy them
  14. 5 points
    Hi, my name is Marcell Nikolausz. I’m a hobby underwater videographer originally from Hungary, living now in Germany. There was a recent discussion about the underrepresentation of videography topics at wetpixel. I also missed discussions about the lower budget video solutions. I’m very much interested in the latest and greatest tools the professionals are using, but those equipment are way beyond my budget and it’s true probably most of the readers of wetpixel. So I thought, I initiate a discussion about low-budget videography. Is it possible at all? I started with underwater videography already during the film era using a Minolta dynax 7000i in an Ikelite housing. That time the acceptable video quality was really expensive, while I could easily afford the same film David Doubilet used (but my photos were still crap in comparison but not because of the “sensor quality”). Especially wide angle video and proper lighting was achievable only for bigger film crews. Today, a cheap action camera has a better quality at a fraction of price what was available 20 years ago for professionals. I get into videography when I purchased a sony nex-5 and I explored that it has a video record button but I was not really hooked at the beginning. The real change happened when I got a GoPro HERO (entry level version of HERO 4, approx. 130 Euro) and started to play with it and decided to get more into videography. I watched many videos on youtube and vimeo but most of them were really bad with lots of shaky camera movements causing sea sickness on land. The other major problem I recognised was the bad colours but somehow I expected it. So I wanted to make completely different underwater films. I watched also many BBC documentaries and films from professionals. I especially liked the work of Howard Hall and it was clear that he used tripod a lot. So my first suggestion is to use some kind of tripod or some other kind of stabilization for your camera. My first solution was a flat rock. I glued a GoPro mount on it and attached my camera. I also tried joby gorillapod but it’s too light for such small cameras. My second solution was a modified aluminium tent-peg. (see picture below). Not much later I invested into a second camera. Instead of a top GoPro I bought the much cheaper Yi 4K (around 200 Euro that time). (It fits better to the low-budget videography). The camera choice will be the topic of a next post. Overall, it was really fun to use these cheap cameras and I created a short film that I entered to the actioncup video competition. It’s a German video competition focusing mainly on small cameras and it has a category for action cameras. My movie won the freshwater category. See the movie below (Sorry but the text is German but I hope you will watch it anyway): Overall the budget of this movie was around 400 Euro. One short footage from this was even used in a bigger TV film (broadcasted in Slovakia) Next post will be about low-budget but relatively good quality cameras.
  15. 5 points
    Nice images, Adam. However, obviously it all depends upon one's situation and subject matter. Not everyone shoots large subjects in open water with artificial lighting. I'm normally shooting small subjects in shallow freshwater streams with natural lighting. And yes, many of my wide angle shots could not be gotten with a large dome. Here are a few examples with subjects less than an inch from a 4" dome (closer than a large dome could get) and/or with the housing pressed against the stream bottom (lower than a large dome could get):
  16. 5 points
    I am happy to share my latest video-interview with Max Ammer, the pioneer of diving in Raja Ampat, West Papua in Indonesia. About 30 years ago, Max came to Raja Ampat in a search of World War II relics. This is a story about how Max built the very first dive resort in Raja Ampat - Kri Eco Resort, and later - Sorido Bay Resort, about conservation efforts of Max and his partners, training local people and building the very first electrical boat in Raja Ampat. Video is shot with Sony NX80, and a few clips with Sony 7Rii. ENJOY. https://youtu.be/vcmAxOhLgEM
  17. 5 points
    Hi, I would like to share a video from my last trip to the river Traun. The river Traun is the most varied dive spot i know here in Austria. Mainly you dive in a dammed area of the Traun with moderate currents. There you can find a sunken pump room, 500 year old roads from the period of salt shipping, beautiful light under driftwood and under the trees at the shoreline and much more. If the conditions are good, its possible to dive the Canyon at the Traun waterfall. The dive gear has to be roped down, the scuba divers has to jump or climb down the steep rocks to enter the water. The Canyon offers a magic scenery with its washed out rock face, cascades and the crystal clear water of a spring pot Alex globaldivemedia.com
  18. 5 points
    Hey all! I've just finished a group of video tutorials designed for all levels of u/w photographers to speed up their editing workflow: -> tutorials.brentdurand.com/editing The videos (and companion articles) cover Presets, Collections and Target Collections, Watermarks and more. Are there other topics you'd like covered? Shoot me a DM if so. Thanks, and enjoy!
  19. 5 points
    Hello everybody, I just returned from a 3 week trip to Indonesia. My first week was spent in Lembeh with NAD Lembeh and had the opportunity to go on my first black water dives. Needless to say I quickly became addicted and didnt miss any dives. A quick review of my experience with NAD Lembeh. I will echo most of the reviews I have seen on the website regarding my experience, it was phenomenal. Although this was my first trip to Lembeh and thus have nothing else to compare it to I will say that I will not be staying anywhere else during any future visits. I had a nice room by the beach, bed was very comfortable and AC worked to perfection. The food was fantastic, and they were very accommodating since I am vegetarian. The dive boats are great with ample room for all on board. The staff carry all your equipment to and from the dive boat and set it up, including the camera. The camera room was very ample with lots of charging space. There are computers to edit/post but I did not take advantage of this service. Since I was in a room by myself I had my own dive guide/buddy/photographic assistant which was Andri. He was great, very patient and never in any rush to move on. It didnt matter whether we spent 30 seconds or 30 minutes in a subject there was never any rush. Here are a few shots taken during black water. Critique highly encouraged. Many more to come including during regular dives. Many more posted on Flickr. Larval wonderpus Blackwater-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Blackwater-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval mimic octopus, maybe? blackwater-7 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr blackwater (1 of 1) by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval long arm octopus blackwater (1 of 1)-5 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval Long Arm Octopus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr blackwater (1 of 1)-6 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  20. 5 points
    I think the answer will depend on what you mean by underwater photography. Carrying a gopro on a stick is a very different thing than diving with a full kit with tray and dual lights and strobes, with macro and WA swap-able lenses. The amount of dive time will also vary by person. Before you branch out from gopros I would say you need to be able to do a few things consistently and without much thought. Buoyancy is key. You need to be able to maintain your buoyancy even when other things are happening to divert your attention. Particularly early on with photography, trying to figure out the settings and just working the camera takes a lot of focus and with newer divers once they pay attention to that, buoyancy and situational awarness start to fall apart. Once you can keep buoyancy when task loaded that's one sign you are ready Situational awareness. Photography can consume most of the attention your brain can give it until certain things become ingrained through experience and muscle memory. That goes for the physical muscle memory of working your gear and your camera as well as the familiarity to be able to do both without much thought. You should be able to function all your normal dive gear quickly and easily without much thought. S drills, lost mask, reg recovery, etc should be very proficient, and you can do them at any time. Adding a camera system in the middle of these can cause real problems if this isn't able to be handled quickly and easily without much thought. It really helps to get very very familiar with any camera system on the surface, and then with a few shallow dives to work out where your problem areas will be. Each person is going to reach this experience level at different times so its hard to say X number of dives will get you there. If you are diving with a group of divers and one or more is mentoring you, ask them to help you work on some task loading exercises, and work through any buoyancy issues when doing them. You can work on camera familiarity on land. Also if someone in your group shoots, see if you can buddy with them and them let you shoot on a dive to see where you are. If things get to be too much work out a plan to just hand stuff off.
  21. 4 points
    First let me say that I am well aware that filing a patent does not guarantee a product will make it to the market but it is nice to dream. Today Fstoppers.com has a post about a Canon US patent for an RF 8-24mm F/4L full frame fisheye and an RF 11-24mm F/4L. The fisheye would be like an 8-15mm with a built-in 1.6X teleconverter to get you all the way to 24mm. An RF 8-24mm f/4 design, which includes examples for an 8-28.
  22. 4 points
    Laurent Ballesta is a marine scientist and underwater photographer whose groundbreaking techniques have revealed a hidden underwater world deep within the Mediterranean Sea.
  23. 4 points
    Just a sea snail from the maldives. Still don't know if I should do more adjustments to the picture but I think this might be my first picture I want to print and hang up at home. But I like process of editing the raw picture, to make it just right to be printed. And feedback is welcome!
  24. 4 points
    Hi Divers Sadly we can't dive in Thailand these days and I miss it badly. But it's given me time to do something I've wanted to do for a long time, to rewatch and rank my favourite underwater documentaries. So I made a video about my top 10 favourites. What's your favourite? Check out my video:
  25. 4 points
    Mostly just frustration on my part that I suddenly need to increase my budget by 25% or more if I still want to do a full frame update than bashing Nauticam specifically. Like any manufacturer, they can ask for whatever price they want, and I'm sure they're taking a gamble of sorts here to see if the features of their housings are sufficiently differentiated to support such a price premium. Given the replies on this post though, they may have tried to push the price premium a bit too far. It's certainly caused a number new purchasers and even existing owners to at least consider alternatives. As said, I've spent a lot of money in the nauticam ecosystem on housings, gears, ports and optics in the last decade. Truth is, if the Nauticam offering was 10% or even 15% more expensive than the competition, I probably wouldn't even bat an eye. I mean, they've always been slightly more expensive than some other aluminium housing manufacturers, but the delta was small enough to overlook or justify based on better ergonomics, being first to market, etc. Charging 65% more than your competitors though -- you'd better have a pretty damn compelling value proposition. The underwater housing market is obviously tiny, and people willing to spend this kind of money on discretionary hobby items are no doubt richer than most. But still -- I don't think the market is entirely price incensitive. If other manufacturers maintain their current price points, and develop solutions for using Nauticam ports/gears/optics with their systems, I don't see how this doesn't lead to Nauticam losing significant market share. But who knows. Maybe I'm just bitter
  26. 4 points
    I took a trip aboard the MSY Seahorse in the Banda Sea back in late September/early October. The primary goal of such a trip is to see schooling hammerhead sharks. This was my second attempt and managed to get some good footage of them. It's really quite a challenge to capture them well as you never know when they will show up and how close they'll be. The GH5 has a hard time focusing on such a subject in the water column at a distance. My strategy each dive was to swim off the wall, turn around and focus the lens on a contrasty area on the verge of visibility. Then, I would keep my fingers away from the focus lever for the rest of the dive! When we finally encountered the school, I had to make a few short fin kicks towards them till the focus peaking appeared around them on the monitor, then pressed record! Here is the video of the trip. Comments and critiques are welcomed.
  27. 4 points
    Hi Adam, im the Winner in the Wide Angle Traditional Category. When you talk about my picture how its the Reflections done Alex says he don't know really. So let me explain. I used a Panasonic LX100ii in a Nauticam Housing and adapted a Raynox Circular Fisheye Lens(is out of production since 10years) on a Flatport with a 4 inch Domeport (dry). The Reflection Effect is created inside the Raynox Circular Fisheye, its a Reflection Tube with a diameter of 3,5cm and a length of 2cm fixed between the first and second glass element. So i can get a very wide angle of view with the reflections. If you adapt a big Reflection Tube outside on a Dome with a Fisheye Lens then you lost a lot angle of view. And the Reflections looks like a mirror. By mine Solution the Effect is more soft. I was really surprised to get the first place. Because like you and Alex says , without the Reflections is like a nothing special Wide Angle Shot. I agree with you completely. But with the colorful reflections is stand out from the crowd. Im a not so really good photographer. Thats why i try mostly some creative ways to get a picture in the camera which looks different. Enrico Somogyi
  28. 4 points
    Insanely lucky to share the water with a blue whale on this year's marlin run in Mexico! We were very far offshore searching for marlins and baitballs when we spotted a spray of water. Assuming it was a humpback (they often frequent the area), we were surprised with the below... Photos below attached, and more at www.instagram.com/PiersGreatPerhaps ☺️
  29. 4 points
    Hi, I went to dive Marsa Shagra in May this year. I felt like i was diving into a subaquatic poem. I use 1 DX Mark II with Nauticam Housing, (no additionnal lights, no filters)
  30. 4 points
    Link to full album HERE Few shots Tompot Blenny Mediterranean by Interceptor121, on Flickr Sunseeker by Interceptor121, on Flickr Hole in the wall by Interceptor121, on Flickr Gennaro and Carmela by Interceptor121, on FlickrBreeding Male Anthias by Interceptor121, on Flickr
  31. 4 points
    This past weekend we made the last dives that Mrs Troporobo and I will do in Anilao. After 18 years in this sometimes delightful, sometimes maddening, always interesting country, and 34 years overseas pursuing careers and diving all over Asia and the Pacific, we are leaving our beach house behind for early retirement near colder water in the Pacific Northwest of the USA. It was a bittersweet weekend, thinking of all we have enjoyed here. Perhaps with that in mind, I thought I could almost see the usual subjects looking at me wondering if I had lost my senses. Just kidding of course, but I want to leave this place with three images from my final dive in the Philippines. And I want to share them here, with a forum that has been a companion and wonderful resource all of this time. Thank you all for helping me to learn and enjoy UW photography. I'm not hanging up my wetsuit for good, but opportunities to submerge it will be much more limited in the future. So to continue abusing Douglas Adams, we're glad that it has come to this . . .
  32. 4 points
    I've done controlled tests before comparing DivePro 18k lights vs. the Gates GT14s and Keldan Luna 8s (13k lumen model). The tests are somewhat complicated by the fact that the DivePros' output is concentrated in a ~90 degree cone, similar to the Gates GT14s, while the Keldans are closer to 110 or 120 degrees. Because of this, the actual amount of light for the Keldan that falls upon the subject ends up being half what you get from the DivePro and the Gates GT14s. The difference between the Gates and DivePros was not measurable in fstops. So.. I wouldn't worry too much about the cheaper 'chinese' lights meaningfully exaggerating their light output. Keldan certainly has nicer controls and better reliability. My dive buddies and I have experienced issues with DivePro cannister lights in cold water (4 degrees) where multiple units just stopped working for no reason. Clearly, the quality control and testing under challenging conditions could use improvement. But in my view Keldan made a serious mistake by using dome ports on the front instead of flat ports. A 90 degree beam is more than enough for video unless you're filming with a fisheye. I note that the X-Lights also use a dome port, which is silly.
  33. 4 points
    Yes, but believe me, he is rock steady. A human dolly. Just look at his old videos before GH5S. Here he experimented with shallow focus. Perfect lightning. He creates a lot of shadows enhancing 3D and super CC. Keep in minf he's at 80m freehand. No camera, no scooter.
  34. 4 points
    I would like to see more video related contents. I think the platform is given, we, video content creators should just put more effort to share our experiences and discuss video-related topics here at wetpixel. I was not that active so far, but I'm planning to start a new topic on "Low-budget underwater videography".
  35. 4 points
    I recently took this shot on a trip to the Souther Great Barrier Reef. It is my best example of balancing flash & ambient so far. I put my lower strobe on a very low power setting tucked in close to the left handle and had the upper strobe on a high power at full rabbit ear position. Hope you enjoy looking as much as I did making it Thanks,
  36. 4 points
    Just did my first dive with the R5 and thought I'd share some sample footage (youtube links below). It's nothing special, just a few different scenes to give you a feel for the image quality. I have the camera in a Nauticam housing with ZEN 230mm dome, using the RF 15-35mm. Settings on all these videos: 4K 30p, HQ mode (oversampled from 8K), ALL-I compression, Canon Log on. Files were edited in Premiere and exported in maximum render quality. Footage was shot on St. Eustatius in the Dutch Caribbean. All videos are shot at around 70 ft depth, conditions were not great: it was an overcast day, still early in the morning, so not a lot of light or colors available at that depth. No artificial light was used, just ambient light. I used a white slate to manually white balance the footage, which is a bit of a hassle on the R5. Taking into account these low-light conditions, I think the camera produced some fantastic video. I am sure though the footage will be much more vibrant in shallow water with more sunlight. Interested to hear what you think. Happy to upload more footage with different settings next week if anyone is interested.
  37. 4 points
    I also mostly stayed close to home last year. Thankfully, the Buffalo National River is only 10 minutes away. These images of a River Cooter and Longear Sunfish were two of my favorites of the year:
  38. 4 points
    Very happy to see the return of this topic! My fave reflects my long-term salmon project that was influenced more by the weather that was excessively wet in 2020 and poor salmon runs than by covid. I took this shot during one of the few and short sunny spells in early July before any salmon had returned to this stream. I used a lens that I had used for this same purpose (juvenile salmon) but with film back in the 90s, the Nikonos RS 28mm. This was one of the lenses that Harald H brought with him to DEMA in '19 following the SEACAM mdification. I have used several other lenses for a similar purpose but was challenged by the nature of underwater optics. This lens has a much flatter field as well as being a sharper water-contact lens. Its small size also helped as the lens was not completely submerged due to the shallow water depth. Rocks on the bottom (get in the way) did not help either.
  39. 4 points
    Monterey, California. September 2020.
  40. 4 points
    Hi everyone, New member here, thought I'd introduce myself with some shots from my home country, Scotland. These recently featured in the Dive Photo Guide photographer of the week. Having some trouble linking images from elsewhere so here's a link to the article and a small sample. http://www.divephotoguide.com/underwater-photography-special-features/article/underwater-photographer-week-mark-kirkland
  41. 4 points
    I got my a7s3 and Nauticam gear just before a big dive trip in the Caribbean in late November. Shot three Sony Profiles settings, sLog3/SGamut3.Cine, HGL3 and No profile. File format:XAVC S 4K at 60fps10 bit 4:2:2 for all profiles. Customize the C4 function for white balance (So I could execute WB in right hand UW and hold Grey slate and later chip chart with left hand). I used official Sony LUTs and Leeming LUTs in post for evaluation of clips. Will edit in FCP and finish color in Resolve. It was a well balanced neutrally buoyant rig with Keldan 4x Lights, red and blue filters were consistently used. I was hoping because of the lowlight capability of this sensor to shoot with no lights so as to not scare off fish. In field evaluation I sensed that just a bit of light made a huge difference in color accuracy and saturation. So after a 3 dive and no lights I shot the remaining 20+ dive with light. My takeaways: 1- Love the setup, would choose sLog3 if time in post permits CC, If not post time then I would go with no profile. You lose 1 maybe 1.5 stops of latitude but generally clips were nicely saturated and accurate. I understand some people think the sony color science is to be avoided but I saw no issues. In also I preferred Sonys LUTs over Leeming LUTs for 90% of the shots. Whats my experience in Video color science? 40Plus years surface shooting and a successful life doing so. UW shooting is just my hobby, 2- I used SDHD cards for the XAVC s 4K file format and they bogged down a Late 2013 Mac Pro with 32GB Ram and top end graphics cards. Had to use proxy's to not go crazy in post. I did buy and have tested the new Sony CFExpress Tough card and "I think" it performs well enough to be able to avoid proxies in post. This is because the CPU has to do less calculations than with a codec that has more compression. I did a surface shoot yesterday (Birds in Flight) using sLog3 S&Q settings for 120fps with XAVC S I 4K and I filled a 160GB card in well, not very long. Luckily I had a laptop to download to continue shooting. Take Away 2.1 if you want 120FPS you better mean it! Or have lotsa expensive cards. Moving them into post and seeing performance will take place in a couple days (I hope). Apologies on long post, but a couple further observations. Cost, yea I'd say camera "May" be a1/3 of the get in the water costs. so, lights and floats, buy the best you can. Housings often are sacrificed if you go for a new camera, but odd note here, I have an a7R4 and it goes in the a7s3 housing. Most of the buttons on the top work but the only button on the back at seemed to work was the Disp button. I am exceptionally happy with this my 3rd rig. Should be able to last the rest of my life. Knock on wood!
  42. 4 points
    How about covering the opposite topic. Moving to smaller sensors and reasons to do so.
  43. 4 points
    I'm pro lanyard all the time. I clip on a coiled lanyard as soon as I splash. I have had to deal with critical safety and rescue scenarios more than once under water where there is no time for spare for the camera. Not having a lanyard already in place means you either don't deal with the emergency when needed most, or you lose the camera.
  44. 4 points
    For many years now I have been diving in the Mar Piccolo - Taranto (Italy) at all times of the year. I discovered this place 25 years ago thanks to the collaboration with a local scientific foundation and since then I have never missed an opportunity to return. In recent years, however, the summer temperature of the water reaches almost 30 degrees, creating great problems for the local fauna and flora. Many species move towards deeper waters and others, unable to move, end their cycle with a slow agony. I returned in these days and this little Mediterranean paradise is starting to revive.
  45. 4 points
    Here is an example I shot last week with a similar setup to yours, using a D850 / 15mm Sigma FE / 170mm port + Inon 330 strobes. The left strobe arm is 12+16+8 and the strobe is pointed inward from the upper left. The right strobe is closer in to the right an pointed forward. ISO 250 / F9 / 1/80s Left strobe is -1.5ev, right is -3ev. The water conditions in Puget Sound were relatively good by local standards at 25 foot visibility but this is heavily particulate water. I did not do any Spot removals of backscatter, but I did bring down to 0 to the Clarity/Texture (midtones) of the green water using LR. You can see there is hardly any distracting backscatter in the image. The point of using a lower strobe power is that you don't illuminate the backscatter nearly as much in poor clarity water. You can boost exposure in post processing to get the brightness you want for the image, selectively if needed. I shot at -1.5ev & -3ev which is about 1/3rd and 1/8th power for the two strobes. If I shot in these dark and chunky waters at Full or Half power the image would be blasted out. If you want a darker background use a faster shutter speed. 1/125 or 1/200. The strobes don't impact open water background color. Shutter speed controls ambient light.
  46. 4 points
    Hi, This video is shot in my home country in the emirates of Fujairah. It is during different seasons. Although visibility is not great, the wreck is full of life and lies in 24m. The whole video is shot in ambient light with red filter using the Panasonic GH5s. I hope you enjoy it.
  47. 4 points
    Cause I’m using the GH5s which lacks IBIS, I had to come up with a way to balance my rig to to make it feel like a traditional video cam rather than the DSLR restricted position. This setup up helps me avoid all types of roll, pitch and yow. It is not a final setup up but it is so balanced that I can let go of the camera midwater and it will just stay there :). I rely totally on the external monitor for all my needs: exposure/focus etc... I can adjust the camera vertically (lookup/down) by adjusting the DIY floors position.
  48. 4 points
    Stopped in Ambon last October for a few days of diving after a LOB trip in the. Banda Sea. If you haven't dived Ambon it's well worth the stop as the macro life is wonderful and abundant. This was my second time visiting and diving with Critterjunkies. Here's the video of the underwater experience. Comments and critiques welcomed.
  49. 4 points
    Hi, a video from my 2nd winter stay at East Greenland. We dove in the fjord in front of Tasiilaq. My plan for this video was to capture the elemental force in this region. I wanted to show time lapses of moving ice during the tides, under- and above water, and mix impressive icebergs with macro footage. A big thank you to Sven from Northern Explorers who supported my ideas and let me do what I wanted! The video is actually in the order as i experienced the trip. As i arrived we still had some left over packice. a few days later the winds brought icebergs in the fjord. After a week hundreds of iceberg right next each other were stranded in a bay. Unfortunately the last week the climate change said hello, and we had unusual warm weather for this time of the season and rain. We can´t went out on the snow mobiles anymore, because all the snow was melted away in only a few days.. And at the dive spots which were in walking distance, the viz droped to 5 meters due the melting water which were washed in the ocean. The video was shot in 7 to 8 days, on 13 dives. Enjoy watching! Alex.
  50. 4 points
    cardinalfish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Double ended pipefish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Flounder by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Jack in jelly by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr

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