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  1. 5 points
    Hey all! I've just finished a group of video tutorials designed for all levels of u/w photographers to speed up their editing workflow: -> tutorials.brentdurand.com/editing The videos (and companion articles) cover Presets, Collections and Target Collections, Watermarks and more. Are there other topics you'd like covered? Shoot me a DM if so. Thanks, and enjoy!
  2. 5 points
    Hello everybody, I just returned from a 3 week trip to Indonesia. My first week was spent in Lembeh with NAD Lembeh and had the opportunity to go on my first black water dives. Needless to say I quickly became addicted and didnt miss any dives. A quick review of my experience with NAD Lembeh. I will echo most of the reviews I have seen on the website regarding my experience, it was phenomenal. Although this was my first trip to Lembeh and thus have nothing else to compare it to I will say that I will not be staying anywhere else during any future visits. I had a nice room by the beach, bed was very comfortable and AC worked to perfection. The food was fantastic, and they were very accommodating since I am vegetarian. The dive boats are great with ample room for all on board. The staff carry all your equipment to and from the dive boat and set it up, including the camera. The camera room was very ample with lots of charging space. There are computers to edit/post but I did not take advantage of this service. Since I was in a room by myself I had my own dive guide/buddy/photographic assistant which was Andri. He was great, very patient and never in any rush to move on. It didnt matter whether we spent 30 seconds or 30 minutes in a subject there was never any rush. Here are a few shots taken during black water. Critique highly encouraged. Many more to come including during regular dives. Many more posted on Flickr. Larval wonderpus Blackwater-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Blackwater-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval mimic octopus, maybe? blackwater-7 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr blackwater (1 of 1) by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval long arm octopus blackwater (1 of 1)-5 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval Long Arm Octopus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr blackwater (1 of 1)-6 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  3. 5 points
    I think the answer will depend on what you mean by underwater photography. Carrying a gopro on a stick is a very different thing than diving with a full kit with tray and dual lights and strobes, with macro and WA swap-able lenses. The amount of dive time will also vary by person. Before you branch out from gopros I would say you need to be able to do a few things consistently and without much thought. Buoyancy is key. You need to be able to maintain your buoyancy even when other things are happening to divert your attention. Particularly early on with photography, trying to figure out the settings and just working the camera takes a lot of focus and with newer divers once they pay attention to that, buoyancy and situational awarness start to fall apart. Once you can keep buoyancy when task loaded that's one sign you are ready Situational awareness. Photography can consume most of the attention your brain can give it until certain things become ingrained through experience and muscle memory. That goes for the physical muscle memory of working your gear and your camera as well as the familiarity to be able to do both without much thought. You should be able to function all your normal dive gear quickly and easily without much thought. S drills, lost mask, reg recovery, etc should be very proficient, and you can do them at any time. Adding a camera system in the middle of these can cause real problems if this isn't able to be handled quickly and easily without much thought. It really helps to get very very familiar with any camera system on the surface, and then with a few shallow dives to work out where your problem areas will be. Each person is going to reach this experience level at different times so its hard to say X number of dives will get you there. If you are diving with a group of divers and one or more is mentoring you, ask them to help you work on some task loading exercises, and work through any buoyancy issues when doing them. You can work on camera familiarity on land. Also if someone in your group shoots, see if you can buddy with them and them let you shoot on a dive to see where you are. If things get to be too much work out a plan to just hand stuff off.
  4. 4 points
    This is the final cut of my semester project for film class at the Academy for Creative Media Windward. Due to the COVID-19 shutdown I was reliant on b-roll that I filmed during an expedition to Cocos Island, Costa Rica in early March of 2020. This is not a "creature feature", more an experiential film to guide the viewer on a virtual dive in the Deep See submersible. Filmed aboard the Undersea Hunter Group’s M/V Argo, on location at Cocos Island, Costa Rica. Best viewed in 4k, with good speakers or headphones... -Brian
  5. 4 points
    Hi Divers Sadly we can't dive in Thailand these days and I miss it badly. But it's given me time to do something I've wanted to do for a long time, to rewatch and rank my favourite underwater documentaries. So I made a video about my top 10 favourites. What's your favourite? Check out my video:
  6. 4 points
    Hi, This video is shot in my home country in the emirates of Fujairah. It is during different seasons. Although visibility is not great, the wreck is full of life and lies in 24m. The whole video is shot in ambient light with red filter using the Panasonic GH5s. I hope you enjoy it.
  7. 4 points
    Stopped in Ambon last October for a few days of diving after a LOB trip in the. Banda Sea. If you haven't dived Ambon it's well worth the stop as the macro life is wonderful and abundant. This was my second time visiting and diving with Critterjunkies. Here's the video of the underwater experience. Comments and critiques welcomed.
  8. 4 points
    I took a trip aboard the MSY Seahorse in the Banda Sea back in late September/early October. The primary goal of such a trip is to see schooling hammerhead sharks. This was my second attempt and managed to get some good footage of them. It's really quite a challenge to capture them well as you never know when they will show up and how close they'll be. The GH5 has a hard time focusing on such a subject in the water column at a distance. My strategy each dive was to swim off the wall, turn around and focus the lens on a contrasty area on the verge of visibility. Then, I would keep my fingers away from the focus lever for the rest of the dive! When we finally encountered the school, I had to make a few short fin kicks towards them till the focus peaking appeared around them on the monitor, then pressed record! Here is the video of the trip. Comments and critiques are welcomed.
  9. 4 points
    Thought i'd posted this before but i don't think i did. A slightly-too-long compilation of 3 days of Oceanic Mantas at Black Rock in the Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar. Very unusual trip in that (i) lots of mantas there and (ii) the visibility wasnt 5m of green for once! Underwater shot with a Canon EOS70D with and without a magic filter. I know there are frame rate stutter issues in places. No sound track as i dont actually have any music stored locally to put onto the footage.
  10. 4 points
    Hi, a video from my 2nd winter stay at East Greenland. We dove in the fjord in front of Tasiilaq. My plan for this video was to capture the elemental force in this region. I wanted to show time lapses of moving ice during the tides, under- and above water, and mix impressive icebergs with macro footage. A big thank you to Sven from Northern Explorers who supported my ideas and let me do what I wanted! The video is actually in the order as i experienced the trip. As i arrived we still had some left over packice. a few days later the winds brought icebergs in the fjord. After a week hundreds of iceberg right next each other were stranded in a bay. Unfortunately the last week the climate change said hello, and we had unusual warm weather for this time of the season and rain. We can´t went out on the snow mobiles anymore, because all the snow was melted away in only a few days.. And at the dive spots which were in walking distance, the viz droped to 5 meters due the melting water which were washed in the ocean. The video was shot in 7 to 8 days, on 13 dives. Enjoy watching! Alex.
  11. 4 points
    Hi, I want to share my latest video with you In winter I have been at the White Sea in Russia for ice diving and i was curious how the landscape and diving might be the rest of the year. Because i like the indian summer colors i decided to come back in autumn. My plan was to capture the autumn mood at the White Sea and create a story around a leave falling and sinking in the sea. On the spot it turned out that this story is not far-fetched, because leaves constantly flushed by the tides in the sea. So, have fun watching! globaldivemedia.com
  12. 4 points
    cardinalfish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Double ended pipefish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Flounder by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Jack in jelly by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  13. 3 points
    The original version of this trip report was posted on the front page of Wetpixel a few weeks ago, but I have now updated it and added some new images on the version I have done on my site. Here is the link to Diving the Witu Islands All the wide-angle images were taken with a Nikon D500 and 8-15mm lens in a Nauticam housing with the 140mm port, which I personally find to be really great combo. The macro images were taken with the 40mm Micro-Nikkor - I screwed up in the last minute packing and left my 60mm and 105mm macros behind... As they say the best lens you have is the one on your camera! I have been visiting Papua New Guinea regularly for 20 years, but this was the first time to the Witu Islands and I really was impressed. When you look at the location of the islands in the Bismarck Sea, relative to the rest of the Coral Triangle, it becomes clearer why they are such so biodiverse. Here are a few images to illustrate what I mean. Don
  14. 3 points
    Hi all, Here I am with my latest effort. You have English and Spanish subtitles Bottom trawling is the most common and destructive fishing practices in the Mediterranean Sea. Bottom trawling represents a major threat to the seafloor ecosystem. Yet soft bottoms are not desolate stretches of sand but complex ecosystems, populated by organisms that are fundamental to the conservation of fish stocks. Giannutri island, part of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park, is a good example of intact marine environments. The fishing ban up to three miles has preserved intact deep habitats and the particular morphology of the island's seabed allows divers to reach the "twilight zone" (i.e. he bathymetric range between 50 and 120 meters.) in a rather simple way. Trimix, DPVs and rebreathers are perfect tools for observing still extremely intact deep environments with less invasiveness. These protected areas suggests how protection, if properly managed, can effectively maintain integrity in environments that host hundred or thousands years old organisms and provide us with natural laboratories where we can study what these environments would be like if they had not been damaged by human activities. On a technical perspective An alternative title of the video could be "History of Panasonic underwater". In the video there are shots taken over many years with my GH2, GH3, GH4 and GH5. So from a technical point of view I'm not at all satisfied with the quality of the footage which in some cases I consider to be very bad. I'm not a professional; I have witnessed some phenomena in a completely unexpected way, with the poor beloved GH2 at 100 meters in winter sea at 1250 ISO or at the end of a dive with flat light batteries. The important thing for me was to be able to communicate a message.. Bye
  15. 3 points
    Red Irish Lord perfectly perched on a sponge. At God's Pocket Nikon D500, Nauticam Housing, Nikon 10.5mm Fisheye, 2x Retra Flashes, ISO 100, f11, 1/125
  16. 3 points
    Excellent photos. I can only contribute with videos, because in the last few years I'm switched from photography. Sorry for the German text but it was a submission to a German underwater video competition. The footages were taken in German lakes close to Leipzig.
  17. 3 points
    Are your handles on backwards or is this your selfie rig? (Just kidding) -Tinman
  18. 3 points
    Sometimes I get the impression this virus has more impact on the brain than on the lungs. Getting bizarre. Here in Germany we had 25.000 peoples dying from the flue in 2018 alone. Zero so far on Corona. And people stack loopaper for the next 10 years... Lets have a Mexican beer, shall we?
  19. 3 points
    Thank you Interceptor, We build the WACP-1 and WACP-2 for underwater photographers who demand superior image quality at larger apertures, such as f/5.6 or even f/4. While the WACP-2 in combination with the Nikon 14-30mm results with 140° AOF images with quite low distortion, and very good image quality across the frame, our main objective is not aiming for zero distortion. First of all, zero distortion doesn't exist at all for any lens in the wide angle range of 130° to 140°. For example, the Canon 11-24mm (max AOV 126°), the Nikon 12-24mm (max AOV 122°) and the Nikon 14-30mm (max AOV 114°) all have certain amount of barrel distortion at the wide end. Naturally, the WACP-2 as an afocal add-on lens mounted in front of a lens having barrel distortion, it will be not able to eliminate the inherent barrel distortion. Using any of these wide angle zoom lenses behind a dome port also doesn't help with barrel distortion. Until now we haven't seen anyone to be able to produce perfect zero distortion images using one of these wide angle lenses behind a dome port. Of course, the normal dome port theory applies here! People can't achieve relatively good sharp corners until closing down the apertures to around f/14, and a dome port could actually induce more barrel distortion to the system. Adding a corrective lens in front of the camera lens may further complicate the issue because it introduces another type of distortion to the system. There is now a 12mm (AOV 122°) lens in the market that claims to have zero distortion, at the price of heavily and unnaturally stretching the images at the corners. It is fine for shooting buildings, but any subject, in particular people, will look extremely unpleasant if placed near the corners. The result of using this lens behind a dome port is yet to be found out. Best regards, Edward
  20. 3 points
    I found the time to do a little write up on underwater white balance that includes some of the techniques I use Hopefully this is useful to most people out there. I have focussed on GH5 picture profile but I guess other camera won't be much different https://interceptor121.com/2019/09/24/the-importance-of-underwater-white-balance-with-the-panasonic-gh5/
  21. 3 points
    I've used the WACP with 28-70mm on several trips over the past year and am impressed with its versatility of FOV range. I believe that is about as close as you’ll get to having your cake and eating it; for now, with full frame. Some examples. At the narrow end (70mm->75degrees): http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive63/FJ190513_3215.jpg http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive63/FJ190514_3382.jpg At the wide end (28mm->130degrees): http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive64/MOR20191007_5670.jpg http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive64/MOR20191004_4678.jpg Downside is weight in lugging this beast down a beach but once in the water it’s a thing of beauty. In Moorea recently we did a lot of swimming in the blue and there wasn’t much difference in water resistance (possibly less) between my rig and those using large domes.
  22. 3 points
    Should you find a way to actually make a living off of selling underwater imagery - Keep it a secret! Because if you don't, then soon everyone else will have the the secret and it won't be a secret anymore and you will be back where you started. Inspiration and innovation is the mother of invention. Actually it’s just a mother.
  23. 3 points
    female paper nautilus/Argonaut riding plastic trash. Although I did see many riding their normal jellyfish, this one made me sad considering the amount of trash we are putting into the world and our oceans. Female Paper Nautilus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr paper nautilus/argonaut with plastic trash by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Female Paper Nautilus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  24. 2 points
  25. 2 points
    It takes a loooong time to get to the Maldives (south of India in case you didn't know) but the diving is fabulous, the people are wonderful, and it's well worth the effort. We just got back from 9 days on the Manthiri, had a fabulous time, and wanted to share our experiences with you. Below you'll find the links to the trip report as well as the overall picture page, which contains 12 teaser pix plus links to the full SmugMug slideshow (view it as a single-page collage, click on individual pix for full-screen, or choose "slideshow"). There are also links to the five short videos we created during the trip as well, which includes the Manta Feeding Aggregation at Raa Atoll (even though the title says Baa). You've got to look at at east that one. WAAAAY cool and amazing experience. Enjoy!!! And let me know if you have question or comments (or want to reserve your spot now for our next journey there). MALDIVES 2019 TRIP REPORT MALDIVES 2019 PIX PAGE: 12 TEASER PIX with SMGMUG & VIDEO LINKS - Ken
  26. 2 points
    Few things: Using the 45 viewfinder for macro does take some time to learn, but makes it much better to frame shots once you get used to it. When I first read that you were bumping up against the viewfinder and that it caused a leak I thought you were talking about the housing - but then realized you were talking about your mask. My mask is up against the 45 viewfinder on every shot - haven't had this problem before... 45 vs. 180 viewfinder: I own both, and have used both, but after getting used to the 45 I've basically put the 180 on the shelf and use the 45 exclusively for macro and wide angle. Lots of folks are going to tell you that the 45 is for macro - the fact that I can rotate the viewfinder so I can easily shoot either portrait or landscape while basically staying in the same orientation to my subject ends up being great for wide angle. Also - when shooting subjects at the surface (my family was in both Moorea and Tetiaroa last year shooting humpbacks) the 45 is perfect, because you can float on the surface and shoot with the camera just below the surface (although we spent a lot of the time either shooting slightly downwards where the viewfinder doesn't help as much, or shooting level while free diving to about 10-15 feet - where the viewfinder is fine). Lighting while shooting humpbacks and sharks in French Polynesia: While shooting the humpbacks I think you are already know that you won't be carrying any lights (strobes, lights, etc.). You are going to swim, and swim some more, and yet swim even more to both get close to the whales and position yourself so that can shoot side on or face on. You are going to want to push the minimum amount of camera gear through the water. It's all ambient light shooting. For shooting the sharks at Fakarava and Rangiroa - I would absolutely take your strobes. Even a small amount of strobe lighting helps freeze the outer edges of the sharks against the water background. Because you will be shooting through several feet of water it will make a big difference (and if you shoot on the outer edges of the passes, you will be deep). Weight restrictions are reasonable on the inter-island flights, and scuba divers can check in an extra 5kg of baggage (on the larger planes). Maldives entries: I've been to the Maldives a number of times, and never had an issue with having my camera handed down to me (via the braided handle clipped near both ball mounts). Some of the dives can be "negative entry" - but never to the point where you couldn't quickly return to the surface to collect your camera. Personally, I would never jump off a boat with my housing, strobes, etc. I have made some "quick entries" sliding off a boat to get shots of dolphins or a manta swimming by, but that's been while snorkeling. Last - you can shoot as many or as few subjects as you want on a dive. However, Anilao is very much a u/w photo destination, and the guides are all (very) used to finding a subject for photographers then expecting them to spend 1 minute - 20+ minutes shooting that one subject. When you are shooting they usually wander off to find the next subject for you. U/W photographers usually only have 2 speeds on a dive - slow and stop. If you're diving with a (non-photographer) buddy, this can cause some tension... as you shoot more with your DSLR you will notice that you will start slowing down as you dive - and your buddy is going to end up waiting for you (sometimes a lot, as you find subjects you want to spend time with). My wife has put up with ~20 years of this, and I've noticed that I shoot a little less on a dive now when we dive together (it's a compromise). When I dive with either our son or daughter (who both also shoot underwater) we'll stay shooting the same subject for minutes at a time (and cover less distance).
  27. 2 points
    Yep, echoing Tim's comments new format is definitely more 21st century. Easy on the eyes with nice contrast and clean lines.

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