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  1. 5 points
    Hey all! I've just finished a group of video tutorials designed for all levels of u/w photographers to speed up their editing workflow: -> tutorials.brentdurand.com/editing The videos (and companion articles) cover Presets, Collections and Target Collections, Watermarks and more. Are there other topics you'd like covered? Shoot me a DM if so. Thanks, and enjoy!
  2. 5 points
    Hello everybody, I just returned from a 3 week trip to Indonesia. My first week was spent in Lembeh with NAD Lembeh and had the opportunity to go on my first black water dives. Needless to say I quickly became addicted and didnt miss any dives. A quick review of my experience with NAD Lembeh. I will echo most of the reviews I have seen on the website regarding my experience, it was phenomenal. Although this was my first trip to Lembeh and thus have nothing else to compare it to I will say that I will not be staying anywhere else during any future visits. I had a nice room by the beach, bed was very comfortable and AC worked to perfection. The food was fantastic, and they were very accommodating since I am vegetarian. The dive boats are great with ample room for all on board. The staff carry all your equipment to and from the dive boat and set it up, including the camera. The camera room was very ample with lots of charging space. There are computers to edit/post but I did not take advantage of this service. Since I was in a room by myself I had my own dive guide/buddy/photographic assistant which was Andri. He was great, very patient and never in any rush to move on. It didnt matter whether we spent 30 seconds or 30 minutes in a subject there was never any rush. Here are a few shots taken during black water. Critique highly encouraged. Many more to come including during regular dives. Many more posted on Flickr. Larval wonderpus Blackwater-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Blackwater-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval mimic octopus, maybe? blackwater-7 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr blackwater (1 of 1) by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval long arm octopus blackwater (1 of 1)-5 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Larval Long Arm Octopus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr blackwater (1 of 1)-6 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  3. 5 points
    I think the answer will depend on what you mean by underwater photography. Carrying a gopro on a stick is a very different thing than diving with a full kit with tray and dual lights and strobes, with macro and WA swap-able lenses. The amount of dive time will also vary by person. Before you branch out from gopros I would say you need to be able to do a few things consistently and without much thought. Buoyancy is key. You need to be able to maintain your buoyancy even when other things are happening to divert your attention. Particularly early on with photography, trying to figure out the settings and just working the camera takes a lot of focus and with newer divers once they pay attention to that, buoyancy and situational awarness start to fall apart. Once you can keep buoyancy when task loaded that's one sign you are ready Situational awareness. Photography can consume most of the attention your brain can give it until certain things become ingrained through experience and muscle memory. That goes for the physical muscle memory of working your gear and your camera as well as the familiarity to be able to do both without much thought. You should be able to function all your normal dive gear quickly and easily without much thought. S drills, lost mask, reg recovery, etc should be very proficient, and you can do them at any time. Adding a camera system in the middle of these can cause real problems if this isn't able to be handled quickly and easily without much thought. It really helps to get very very familiar with any camera system on the surface, and then with a few shallow dives to work out where your problem areas will be. Each person is going to reach this experience level at different times so its hard to say X number of dives will get you there. If you are diving with a group of divers and one or more is mentoring you, ask them to help you work on some task loading exercises, and work through any buoyancy issues when doing them. You can work on camera familiarity on land. Also if someone in your group shoots, see if you can buddy with them and them let you shoot on a dive to see where you are. If things get to be too much work out a plan to just hand stuff off.
  4. 4 points
    Stopped in Ambon last October for a few days of diving after a LOB trip in the. Banda Sea. If you haven't dived Ambon it's well worth the stop as the macro life is wonderful and abundant. This was my second time visiting and diving with Critterjunkies. Here's the video of the underwater experience. Comments and critiques welcomed.
  5. 4 points
    I took a trip aboard the MSY Seahorse in the Banda Sea back in late September/early October. The primary goal of such a trip is to see schooling hammerhead sharks. This was my second attempt and managed to get some good footage of them. It's really quite a challenge to capture them well as you never know when they will show up and how close they'll be. The GH5 has a hard time focusing on such a subject in the water column at a distance. My strategy each dive was to swim off the wall, turn around and focus the lens on a contrasty area on the verge of visibility. Then, I would keep my fingers away from the focus lever for the rest of the dive! When we finally encountered the school, I had to make a few short fin kicks towards them till the focus peaking appeared around them on the monitor, then pressed record! Here is the video of the trip. Comments and critiques are welcomed.
  6. 4 points
    Thought i'd posted this before but i don't think i did. A slightly-too-long compilation of 3 days of Oceanic Mantas at Black Rock in the Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar. Very unusual trip in that (i) lots of mantas there and (ii) the visibility wasnt 5m of green for once! Underwater shot with a Canon EOS70D with and without a magic filter. I know there are frame rate stutter issues in places. No sound track as i dont actually have any music stored locally to put onto the footage.
  7. 4 points
    Hi, a video from my 2nd winter stay at East Greenland. We dove in the fjord in front of Tasiilaq. My plan for this video was to capture the elemental force in this region. I wanted to show time lapses of moving ice during the tides, under- and above water, and mix impressive icebergs with macro footage. A big thank you to Sven from Northern Explorers who supported my ideas and let me do what I wanted! The video is actually in the order as i experienced the trip. As i arrived we still had some left over packice. a few days later the winds brought icebergs in the fjord. After a week hundreds of iceberg right next each other were stranded in a bay. Unfortunately the last week the climate change said hello, and we had unusual warm weather for this time of the season and rain. We can´t went out on the snow mobiles anymore, because all the snow was melted away in only a few days.. And at the dive spots which were in walking distance, the viz droped to 5 meters due the melting water which were washed in the ocean. The video was shot in 7 to 8 days, on 13 dives. Enjoy watching! Alex.
  8. 4 points
    Hi, I want to share my latest video with you In winter I have been at the White Sea in Russia for ice diving and i was curious how the landscape and diving might be the rest of the year. Because i like the indian summer colors i decided to come back in autumn. My plan was to capture the autumn mood at the White Sea and create a story around a leave falling and sinking in the sea. On the spot it turned out that this story is not far-fetched, because leaves constantly flushed by the tides in the sea. So, have fun watching! globaldivemedia.com
  9. 4 points
    cardinalfish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Double ended pipefish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Flounder by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Jack in jelly by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  10. 3 points
    Red Irish Lord perfectly perched on a sponge. At God's Pocket Nikon D500, Nauticam Housing, Nikon 10.5mm Fisheye, 2x Retra Flashes, ISO 100, f11, 1/125
  11. 3 points
    Excellent photos. I can only contribute with videos, because in the last few years I'm switched from photography. Sorry for the German text but it was a submission to a German underwater video competition. The footages were taken in German lakes close to Leipzig.
  12. 3 points
    Are your handles on backwards or is this your selfie rig? (Just kidding) -Tinman
  13. 3 points
    Sometimes I get the impression this virus has more impact on the brain than on the lungs. Getting bizarre. Here in Germany we had 25.000 peoples dying from the flue in 2018 alone. Zero so far on Corona. And people stack loopaper for the next 10 years... Lets have a Mexican beer, shall we?
  14. 3 points
    Thank you Interceptor, We build the WACP-1 and WACP-2 for underwater photographers who demand superior image quality at larger apertures, such as f/5.6 or even f/4. While the WACP-2 in combination with the Nikon 14-30mm results with 140° AOF images with quite low distortion, and very good image quality across the frame, our main objective is not aiming for zero distortion. First of all, zero distortion doesn't exist at all for any lens in the wide angle range of 130° to 140°. For example, the Canon 11-24mm (max AOV 126°), the Nikon 12-24mm (max AOV 122°) and the Nikon 14-30mm (max AOV 114°) all have certain amount of barrel distortion at the wide end. Naturally, the WACP-2 as an afocal add-on lens mounted in front of a lens having barrel distortion, it will be not able to eliminate the inherent barrel distortion. Using any of these wide angle zoom lenses behind a dome port also doesn't help with barrel distortion. Until now we haven't seen anyone to be able to produce perfect zero distortion images using one of these wide angle lenses behind a dome port. Of course, the normal dome port theory applies here! People can't achieve relatively good sharp corners until closing down the apertures to around f/14, and a dome port could actually induce more barrel distortion to the system. Adding a corrective lens in front of the camera lens may further complicate the issue because it introduces another type of distortion to the system. There is now a 12mm (AOV 122°) lens in the market that claims to have zero distortion, at the price of heavily and unnaturally stretching the images at the corners. It is fine for shooting buildings, but any subject, in particular people, will look extremely unpleasant if placed near the corners. The result of using this lens behind a dome port is yet to be found out. Best regards, Edward
  15. 3 points
    I found the time to do a little write up on underwater white balance that includes some of the techniques I use Hopefully this is useful to most people out there. I have focussed on GH5 picture profile but I guess other camera won't be much different https://interceptor121.com/2019/09/24/the-importance-of-underwater-white-balance-with-the-panasonic-gh5/
  16. 3 points
    I've used the WACP with 28-70mm on several trips over the past year and am impressed with its versatility of FOV range. I believe that is about as close as you’ll get to having your cake and eating it; for now, with full frame. Some examples. At the narrow end (70mm->75degrees): http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive63/FJ190513_3215.jpg http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive63/FJ190514_3382.jpg At the wide end (28mm->130degrees): http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive64/MOR20191007_5670.jpg http://www.underwaterdisplay.net/dive64/MOR20191004_4678.jpg Downside is weight in lugging this beast down a beach but once in the water it’s a thing of beauty. In Moorea recently we did a lot of swimming in the blue and there wasn’t much difference in water resistance (possibly less) between my rig and those using large domes.
  17. 3 points
    Should you find a way to actually make a living off of selling underwater imagery - Keep it a secret! Because if you don't, then soon everyone else will have the the secret and it won't be a secret anymore and you will be back where you started. Inspiration and innovation is the mother of invention. Actually it’s just a mother.
  18. 3 points
    female paper nautilus/Argonaut riding plastic trash. Although I did see many riding their normal jellyfish, this one made me sad considering the amount of trash we are putting into the world and our oceans. Female Paper Nautilus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr paper nautilus/argonaut with plastic trash by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Female Paper Nautilus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  19. 2 points
    Paolo has been kindly sharing his experience on my blog. He has recently won or been placed in a number of competitions but more importantly he likes to experiment Plenty to learn https://interceptor121.com/2020/03/27/121-with-paolo-isgro/ Looking for others that want to share... please get in touch
  20. 2 points
    Tiger beach, Bahamas aboard Aggressor Bahamas by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Bahamas by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Bahamas-2 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Lembeh, Indonesia with NAD Lembeh Rhinopia by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Lembeh by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr paper nautilus/argonaut on jellyfish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Komoda, Indonesia aboard Indo Siren Nudibranch with emperor shirmp by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Komodo by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Striped catfish eating by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  21. 2 points
    A couple of random thoughts. I dive with a D850 in a Nauticam housing and a 230mm dome port. I used to take the Neoprene cover off underwater and simply stick my arm through a hole, up to my armpit. My strategy failed in Maui due to strong currents. The cover got swept off and away as I entered the water, so now I just take the cover off on the boat. On the socks - I've been using a pair of Apollo Bio Fins since 2006, and until they wore out I had a pair of hard-soled booties that were nice to walk in. But those booties were a little bit loose. I very often got lower leg cramps until one day I tried on a pair of (very thin) neoprene socks. The original reason (and they work fantastically well for it) was to make it easier to slide my feet into the wetsuit. What became clear though was that my lower leg cramps almost disappeared. Evidently you don't want dive booties fitting loose (like a cowboy boot). There has been a downside though. Ever since I started using dive socks and making my feet tighter in the boots I've had an issue with a grain of sand getting caught between two toes. By the end of a dive I'll have a small sore - or worse - worn into the sides of those toes. So now I premptively wrap a bandaid around my long toe before a week of diving. Problem solved. On barnacles - I wish I had gloves on for my first open water dive in St. Thomas. Went down an old line and sliced one of my fingers pretty well. Blood is green at 70 feet, by the way. On tethering: I'm a zealot here. I once participated in an unsuccessful search for a new rig that got away from a diver as he was getting back on board. First thing I do when I get in the water is attach my tether, before I descend. My tether isn't on a retractor and is about 3 feet, and stretches for more. I let go of my rig quite a lot actually, letting it hang down while I take care of business.
  22. 2 points
    The typical timetable to get a medicine through a trial is well over 1 year assuming you have something that works Considering that the level of proximity in planes is not compliant with the requirements to prevent covid transmission I am concerned that if there is no alternative approach there won’t be any trips involving flights for some time. This may lead to disintegration of the diving industry and maybe other touristic enterprises On a positive note pollution is dropping and the air is cleaning at this pace this will be more effective of any government green emissions scheme Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  23. 2 points
    There is an oring you can place on the M67 mount to avoid water flushing You will need to stop the lens to f/11 to get sharp shot maybe f/8 not wider Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  24. 2 points
    Another data point here: Issue is trying to use the single fibre optic port to trigger two strobes and it's not working. It is a different version of the housing so check if the housing you are looking at uses this same arrangement. Also check port availability. With luck you may find a user who can comment from experience.
  25. 2 points
    The original version of this trip report was posted on the front page of Wetpixel a few weeks ago, but I have now updated it and added some new images on the version I have done on my site. Here is the link to Diving the Witu Islands All the wide-angle images were taken with a Nikon D500 and 8-15mm lens in a Nauticam housing with the 140mm port, which I personally find to be really great combo. The macro images were taken with the 40mm Micro-Nikkor - I screwed up in the last minute packing and left my 60mm and 105mm macros behind... As they say the best lens you have is the one on your camera! I have been visiting Papua New Guinea regularly for 20 years, but this was the first time to the Witu Islands and I really was impressed. When you look at the location of the islands in the Bismarck Sea, relative to the rest of the Coral Triangle, it becomes clearer why they are such so biodiverse. Here are a few images to illustrate what I mean. Don
  26. 2 points
    ATTENTION AMATEUR & PRO UW PHOTOGRAPHERS planning a trip to Baja Mexico: Now that I have returned from Baja California, Mexico, here is what I know 1st hand. If you fly into Cabo San Lucas or into La Paz, Mexico, expect to pay a fee if the Customs agents stop you and notice that you have an underwater housing. The agent will Google the housing to see it’s worth, then demand that you pay 16% of that price. Many new DSLR UW housings are $4,000 or more. You will pay $640 US dollars to use that fancy new housing in Baja Mexico. The customs agent will also show you an official document in English that states you may bring in 2 cameras and the accoutrements involved, but the underwater housing is a fee by Mexican law. I ran into a pro photographer I know who happened to be staying in the same hotel. He was leading a small underwater photo tour in La Paz. The vacationers were all from Switzerland and they all told me that they had to pay exorbitant fees for their camera housings and their video housings at La Paz airport even though they were all amateurs themselves. Customs officials are targeting underwater photographers at the airport in Cabo San Lucas and in La Paz. If you have a hard-sided protective travel case for your gear they will stop you. The customs agent said I was allowed 2 cameras and the things that go along with that, BUT an underwater housing must be taxed by Mexican customs laws even if you are not a professional. He showed me the document in writing about this customs law. I told the officer that I was NOT a pro photographer, but the document he showed me specifies underwater housings as a taxable item. I told the officer that my housing was old and maybe worth $200 which is true since it is about 7 years old. He got out his cell phone and looked up the model name and number (Olympus PT-EP08 UW case for E-M5) and said it was worth at least $300. In order for me to enter the country and use MY OWN underwater camera case for personal use (I do not earn a living by photography nor do I sell my photos online or in another way) I had to pay $50 US dollars to keep my housing with me. FYI: Customs officers in Cabo San Lucas airport take credit cards for this "Photographer's Fee". Even though Cabo/La Paz is the nearest warm water diving destination to my home, this will be my last vacation here for underwater photography. If you have a nondescript, soft-sided carry-on suitcase that you can carry all of you underwater housings in, then do it. If you have to check your underwater housings through with a hard case and your dive gear is packed in a bag with a diving insignia on it, they will stop you. If they find an underwater camera housing in you luggage, the Mexican authorities will nail you for 16% of the value of that housing at the price that they find online.
  27. 2 points
    Here is a link on Nautilus Fleet’s website regarding this topic: https://www.dropbox.com/s/a3g70ez3yz733d3/2019-Customs-Cameras.pdf?dl=0
  28. 2 points
    This is the feedback I got from Backscatter on the MWL-1 with a 30 on m43: “If you wanted to use the 30mm macro with the MWL-1, I’d recommend using the CMC-2. Otherwise, the minimum focus distance is too close with the CMC-1. You’d basically have to be touching the subject to achieve focus. This is a pretty cool setup, but a little limited. The MWL-1 doesn’t provide the best image quality unless you shoot at really small apertures.” So not much of an endorsement for the combination. Seems like the Pana14-42 with WWL-1 and SCS make a better if larger and more expensive combo.
  29. 2 points
    If you can, try to go to the Reef House resoort for lunch in Oak Ridge. It's a very personable place. If there around 1:30 when the dive boat is in for lunch, talk with divemaster David and get local suggestions. Nobody knows that section of Roatan like him. You might also talk to the resident dive instructor Robert about taking a trip over to Cayos Cochinos for some different diving. If you have never been to the Mangrove swamps in Roatan (above water), I highly recommend it. Also drop into Hole in the Wall, past the Czech Village.
  30. 2 points
    I just got my new strobes and physically they are beautiful, even the neoprene sleeves look awesome on them. Hopefully the wheatear this weekend will allow for diving here. With out yet been shooting underwater, my only complain would be is that it looks easy to scratch the front acrylic. Retra sells protectors to use when not using diffusers or reducers. Those bits are now ordered. Bluetooth connectivity seems to work well, but I have only been playing with the pilot light intensity. Now we have to wait for a new trigger with HSS, it will be interesting to try HSS. Only time will tell if the new strobes are as reliable as the trusty Inons Z240. I hope they do. Kind regards, Joss
  31. 2 points
    Look for fish sitting still with all their fins up, they are probably at a cleaning station - the cleaner may be quite small and not so easy to spot.
  32. 2 points
    Haven't posted on here for a while but here's some footage I shot for the BBC which ended up as a digital piece on their website. Have a cuppa and enjoy for 10mins! https://www.roger-munns.com/relax-in-a-lake-full-of-jellyfish/
  33. 2 points
    Most of this video is shot with sony FE 90mm + SMC-2. First time I used it. SMC-2 is no easy...
  34. 2 points
    Hi, I wanted to update the topic with some images that show the condition of the color checker after 4 years of use. Honestly, I am impressed with the quality of the chart especially with color blocks that are still retaining the original colors. The main problem is that the pages after a lot of use come out cause the glue deteriorates. This can easily be fixed by using super glue. If you do underwater videography as a profession or you can afford a color checker, it is worth the investment. Remember to chose a video chart that is supported by your editing/color correction program. The color checker needs good lighting to produce good result. It can get you to a good starting point for color correction or can be used as a good reference.
  35. 2 points
    I really like my Sony. The a6000 is a 2014 camera, so not really the latest tech. Also switching to a different brand and get the equivalent (dry land) lenses just because a particular housing was cheap, I don't think I'd save money. I wouldn't switch to a smaller sensor, I wouldn't probably switch to full frame either. I definitely wouldn't switch to DSLR, because I've never had one and mirrorless just makes much more sense to me. So my switching options would be limited Fuji and Canon, and I probably wouldn't accept just any one of those. However I might start looking for used housings for Sony as well. I could upgrade the body, especially to an a6500 for IBIS, or a6600 but that is the latest tech... I have never touched a pro brand housing and I have no idea what it is that makes up the retail price. For me the cheap chinese seems to be doing everything a housing should do, maybe just not the exact same quality as the pro stuff. I'm not that interested in adapting lenses so the available SeaFrogs ports are enough. The same housing even lets me upgrade the camera body up to a6400/a6500. Sure I could see some of the pro stuff being the same and would be surprised if not. Maybe that's just another future upgrade, but as of now I think I'll stick to the plan. Ok wow, now that you said it like the tenth time I had to take a closer look Earlier I Googled it and closed the browser tab when I saw the price. So there's more optics in this thing than just flat rear and dome front glass... I thought that all domes are, well just domes and Meikon did their best in making a chinese copy. Now I know what I'm doing. Thank you. - I'll buy a diopter and a flip adapter. Shoot from quite small to medium sized subjects. - I'll try something with the DIY lights, probably won't ever be powerful enough to do much for wide angle shooting. - Keep searching for used strobes and eventually upgrade to those. Good ones. - For a wet dome I'll search for a used WWL-1. - Maybe upgrade the housing in some point and buy some lenses, but although I thought this is where to start, this is actually the last thing to worry when trying to get better shots on somewhat a low budget. I could buy the Meikon dome for starters, but as I am traveling with two backpacks it's nice to not carry a large piece like that. I might need a bigger backpack when I start to collect more gear. If I'll get the 10 - 18 for wide angle I would get a dome port, possibly an 8" one to allow for over/under shots, so that's skipping the WWL-1. I also need my own scuba equipment, including a dry suit for Nordic diving. Practise makes perfection and rental gear guided fun dives makes a lot of spending on practise, also won't be able to spend time on a single subject as the group will keep moving. So even if I could improve my underwater shooting with not so expensive investments, all in all I have a lot to spend on. Also my motorcycle needs a new motor. And that's just for my hobbies. Did I mention I don't make a lot of money as I mainly work to just get by? I have really chosen the worst hobbies to go with my work ethics... So I might be annoying on this forum for quite a while before I have anything to call a complete setup. Have we come to a consensus? Thank you so much everyone!
  36. 2 points
    Thank you all for your interest in my article in UWPMAG.com. Your questions for the most part address the Sony A7R IV and the Sony FE 90mm F/2.8 macro lens. So let me start off by saying that I am Senior Reviewer for uwpmag.com and I have done over eighty equipment reviews for this magazine alone. Most of my reviews address mirrorless cameras from a number of manufactures and that I have not done much with Panasonic because the Editor is a Pana user and covers that equipment. Most if not all of the questions you have ask are answered in those reviews so I will highlight some of the specific issues you have ask about. First is the issue of comparing apples to apples. I am a big fan of 4/3 and M43 having moved from the Nikonos RS film camera to Olympus 43 (E-1, E-300, E330 E-3) as my first digital cameras. I later migrated to M43 with the first camera with an Olympus housing. So first I can assure you that shooting with M43 is not at all like using Full Frame or Medium Format. Both FF and MF require much more critical focus than M43 or even APS-C. The first Sony FF cameras I reviewed were the A7R II and A7 II with the Sony FE 90mm macro. At that time I said that the 90mm macro was the best macro lens I have ever used, prior to that it was the Olympus 50mm F/2 for 4/3. I have never said that the Sony 90 macro was the fastest macro lens I have ever used so let me clarify that distinction. With each new A7R the auto focus has improved and the recent firmware update for A7R III has made the camera even better but not as good as the RIV. As I covered extensively in both of my A7R IV reviews I have completely changed my auto focus setting preferences. With Olympus EM-5, EM-5 II, EM-1, EM1 II, Sony A7R II & III, Nikon Z-7, Canon EOS R and more I have always used AF-S with back focus because that was what worked best for me while reviewing equipment. I also had a manual focus gear for most of those reviews which I used with subjects in the 1:2 to super macro range. I have now gone to what Sony calls AF-C (auto focus continues) and Tracking: Flexible Spot S (also implemented in the A6400 & A6600). This has allowed me to abandon rear focus and I have yet the use the manual focus gear. I want to make this clear, other brands like Olympus have similar focus settings but they have just not worked all that well for me. Sony is a clear leader in the area of auto focus tech and to say that all mirrorless systems have adopted EYE AF may be true but they just don't rise to the quality of the Sony EYE AF. Sony has two native FE macro lenses the 50mm F/2.8 and the 90mm F/2.8 both of which are class leading. With the A7R IV you can toggle between 61MP FF and 26+MP APS-C which gives an equivalent 90 & 135 or 50 & 75. My personal preference is for the 90 over 100/105 because of the wider AOV, they all end up at 1:1 so you have a slightly wider range without having much closer. As a point of reference I have used the Nauticam SMC-2 with excellent results. That is more than enough magnification for me. Regarding adapted lenses like I used for my Canon EOS R and Nikon Z-7 reviews they are just not the same. Mirrorless lens design is just different from DSLR lens design. So while adapted lenses are quite expectable (I use the Canon 8-15 Fisheye zoom with Metabones for Sony) they will never be as good as like quality lenses designed for mirrorless. When Canon and Nikon introduced DSLR's they kept the same lens mount so film users migrate film lenses. How many photographers are still using film lenses on DSLR's only those that have converted Nikonos or Nikonos RS lenses for underwater use. I have done 1000's of dives with Olympus gear and I can assure you that it works very well but is not up to the current Sony standard for AF. Last I am not sponsored by anyone and while I have an opportunity to test a wide range of equipment the equipment I own I paid for just like everyone else. I was accused of being an Olympus fanboy for years and now the same is true of Sony. The truth is I buy what works best for me, I went back to Olympus after a short stint with the Sony A7R II/A7 II productivity decreased. Since the release of A7R III I have been all in with Sony. That does not mean that I would not switch again if someone builds a better mousetrap. All photos with the Sony 90 macro and Backscatter MF-1 flash.
  37. 2 points
    Keldan sell float rings for their lights buy them as the lights have torque that will bend your arms The WWL-1 with the collar together with the 35 macro port and the 14-42 MkII is 880 grams negative in fresh water in total you will need 2 KG of lift muvh better to balance the lights and the housing separately and keep the arms light
  38. 2 points
    If one dome is 10 cm radius and the other is 12 with the same lens you need two cm more. Fisheye lenses tend to have the entrance pupil right at the end of the lens you can find those on panotools https://wiki.panotools.org/Entrance_Pupil_Database#First_party_lenses For a fisheye lens generally you can try the longest extension until it sees the petals and vignettes and this gives you the best set up. On a fisheye lens I doubt you will be able to see the difference between a 10 cm and 12 cm radius but for a rectilinear lens those 2 cm are worth times 4 for focus distance. You should double check you are using the superdome with the correct extension for the rectilinear lens. In general 20 mm is not very wide however and large domes are not so important. Looking at this lens the entrance pupil is probably inside the housing so if you were using extensions (that will not vignette as the dome is huge) you are probably in a situation where the lens has a lot of distortion and the quality is compromised. Looking at entrance pupils of other nikon prime lenses they all look pretty poor performers. Zoom like 10-24 or 14-24 that are longer lenses will most likely do better at least at wide end due to the geometry of the housing. As you can read I do a lot of tests in the sink or pools....
  39. 2 points
    @Interceptor121 Have you tried the A7rIII? I'd welcome any tips. Rather than hijacking this thread, I'll just add a link to a blog post I wrote on this specific topic https://naturetripper.com/underwater-macro-photography/ Anyway, I've read in reviews that the A7rIV is an improvement. That'd be good. (Sorry, Adam, for going off-topic here.)
  40. 2 points
    I can see both sides of the coin as im a photographer (or claim to be) and also a guide. Personally when ive got my full camera setup in photographer mode i would NOT want to guide me. No matter how much i try to be a good buddy and good group person i simply cant pull it off. As advice above, going when its quiet OR getting a private guide is often the only sensible option. Speaking as a guide its a nightmare when you have a group of "normal" divers who want a tour and 1 proper photographer with a camera. Its impossible to please both.
  41. 2 points
    1. The color chart isn't necessary. It's there to confirm the accuracy of the technique. 2. The technique as I understand it requires multiple pictures of the same object from different distances in order to reverse-engineer the water filtration factor by comparing the colors of that object (or pixel) from different distances. 3. The advantage over a simple white balance as far as I understand is that it depth-maps all the elements in the picture in 3d space and appropriately color-corrects for all of them depending on the amount of water between that object and the camera. So you'd see warm colors extending far into the background, not just for the foreground subject as you would get with a normal white balance off a grey card at foreground distance. 4. For photos this process is rather cumbersome as it forces you to take multiple pictures of the same subject from different distances. So it will not provide a 1-click adjustment for photos in its current form. 5. For video however, this could be brilliant if your video clip involves movement anyway, as you can get a lot of distance information from subsequent frames of the video (the same way you can get 3d mapping from a moving video clip when doing photogametry). So potentially this could be implemented as a 1-click solution for a video file. Though it would obviously work better raw video.
  42. 2 points
    Hi to all, The Sea&Sea M77 (or M82) correction lens is a great tool for rectilinear wide angle lens. The M77 is a meniscus lens which offers a compensation of the dome port. That compensation increasings the perifpheral sharpness more than closing the aperture over f/16 , where the diffraction became a waste. I use Sea&Sea MDX-D800 with Nikon 17-35/2.8 +Sea&Sea M77 behind the 240 dome + ER40+ER20 (extension ring). Also the Nikon 18-35/3.5-4.5 AFs + Sea&Sea M77 offers good results using the same 240 dome + ER40+ER20. Very good result for me is from the old Tokina AT-X 17/3.5 AF Aspherical (thanks to Adam indications) + Sea&Sea M77 and extension ring 40mm (dome 240+ER40) for more compact asset. Tokina 17 has an MFD shorter than the two Nikon wide zoom and it's better in any case. I'd like to try newest 230 glass dome in the future..... but the future is mirrorless! For nikon user (like me) is a difficult time, today we have few choices for Z system (native) and too old lens for F.
  43. 2 points
    Here my 2 cents on the excessive noise problem with small sensors: Trimix-Wolfgang's observations on excessive noise with MFT are supported by the testshots of DPReview, so this are not just subjective impressions and his observations are substantial. This is, however, only the case when comparing the cameras at the original manufacturers ISO settings. To have a look on your own, open this link: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-lumix-dc-gh5s-review/6. Select as cameras OMD-10III (similar sensor as EM5), EM1II (for best MFT sensor), D500 (for Z50 comparison, likely similar sensor) and D850 (for FF reference). When selecting ISO100 and pushing up exposure +6EV with the Nikons, and ISO200 (=base ISO with olys) and +5EV with olys, one can see excess noise with olys and D500 performs much better as expected by the small difference in physical sensor size (384% for FX, 165% for DX and 100% for MFT): Manufactureres ISO settings can, however, not always directly be compared: DxO measure the actual ISO sensitivity by themselves to make the ISO information provided by the manufacturers comparable. Then, at comparable ISO sensitivity, the SNR of D500 is almost identical to EM1II. According to DxO an ISO200 at the EM1II is in fact ISO83 (="DxO ISO ?"), ISO100 in D500 and D850 correspond to ISO70: Wolfgang
  44. 2 points
    This is my first time posting here and I am excited to share some of my images from last months trip to Bonaire. https://www.elsasserphotography.com/Galleries/Bonaire-2019 These are all taken with an Olympus Em1 Mk2 in the Nauticam Housing. Wide angle shots used the Panasonic 8mm FE lens, and the macro shots the Olympus 60mm. Post processing done in Lightroom and sometimes in Photoshop as well. This is my third trip with my new camera (previously used the TG4) and definitely have noticed an improvement in my images, but still would love any feedback from the amazing photographers on this forum!
  45. 2 points
    I use this project suggested in one the several threads on the topic It's perfect for my needs and very cheap
  46. 2 points
    Unknown octopus species Octopus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr Octopus by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr octopus sp by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr octopus sp by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  47. 2 points
    I put together my first kit in early 2016. At the time, I believe the Sony A7II was the only full frame mirrorless choice out there. I went back and forth doing hours upon hours of research. It finally came down to a choice between the A7RII and the Olympus EM-1. I wound up choosing the EM-1. Price was a considerable factor. Not only was the Sony body more expensive, but the glass was much more expensive as well. And heavier. From a travel perspective, the M4/3 body and lenses are a heck of a lot smaller and lighter to lug around. At the time, there was not a whole lot of great native Sony glass to pair up with the A7... I would imagine that has changed, but I can't say that I am super familiar with Sony lens offerings currently. Certainly M4/3 have TONS of great lens choices that are tried and true for underwater applications. I have been SUPER happy with my EM-1. Obviously nowadays, you can get the mark II, which has a slightly higher MP sensor (20 vs 16). However, aside from a faster AF, I'm not sure how many of the other modest improvements are going to make any difference to you underwater. And, if you can stomach not HAVING to have the newest model, you'll surely find EM1 bodies and housings in the classifieds for a fraction of what you'll pay for a new body and housing. For me, the 16 MP sensor has worked well enough. I have made prints that I've hung at my office up to 24x36 inches at 300 DPI. Obviously you can't crop as much as you'd be able to crop with the A7RIII, but unless you are planning on making HUGE prints, all a 42 MP sensor is going to do is fill up your SD card faster. Also, do not forget that the EM-1 allows strobe syncing up to 1/320th of a second, which outperforms most other higher end offerings on the market. My final plug for the EM-1 is that the ability to change shooting parameters (aperture, shutter speed) on the fly is BRILLIANTLY easy. Regarding Nauticam vs Ikelite, I've only used Nauticam, so cannot compare the two. But my wife and I both shoot an EM1 in Nauticam and everything has been bullet proof. Vacuum pump and leak sensor are a no brainer. I agree with bill1946, SS YSD2 are a great bang for the buck and have worked very well for me. I have over 200 dives in with my older non-J D2s and haven't had any issues. Obviously numerous posts around these forums will cast some doubt in your mind about D2 reliability. If I had to do it over again, it would be between YSD2 and some RETRAs. Hope this helps!
  48. 2 points
    diminuative paper nautilus/argonauts. these guys are dwarfs in comparison to the large females male paper nautilus/argonaut on jellyfish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr male paper nautilus/argonaut on jellyfish by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr
  49. 2 points
  50. 2 points
    I will start by saying that my equipment is not the limiting factor in getting better images, its the grey matter behind the viewfinder that holds them back! I see great images all the time shot on all formats. I'm a big fan of the m4/3 system in general and Olympus gear in particular - I've had three of them. I currently use an E-M1 mk II in a Nauticam housing. I shoot stills exclusively and macro with the 60mm lens probably 80% of the time and also use a Subsee +5 diopter which allows 2:1 magnification. The E-M1 has very good autofocus and decent continuous focus with tracking that I am starting to appreciate in some situations. The 60mm macro lens is super sharp. The m4/3 system with its 2x crop factor has obvious advantages for macro photography (and for wildlife, which I also do). The size and weight of the body and lenses are of course more travel friendly , but to be honest not a game changer compared to full frame once you pack the housing, strobes, batteries etc. For a benchmark, everything I need fits in a Pelican 1600. I have not used a full frame kit but I dive with people who do, and I believe that the IQ of both ecosystems is comparable. I will say that I have seen images from full frame systems that I don't think I could have made with my setup. This holds especially for wide angle. But I feel no compelling reason to change.

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