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  1. 7 points
    Wolfgang sent me a PM and asked me to comment on my experience with the AF performance of the Sony A7RIV and Sony 90 macro and the Canon 100 macro on Canon dSLR. I was a long term Canon dSLR user (20D, 40D, 50D, 7D, 7DMkII and 5DMkIII) all with the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro. Just over a year ago I changed to Sony A7RIV. Initially I used the Canon 100 macro on the Sony with a Metabones adapter but changed to the Sony 90 macro after 3 months. My wife still uses my 7DMkII with the Canon 100 macro so I was able to compare all combinations of camera/macro lens possible just now. Room was dimly lit. Results varied based on what focus point setup I used on each camera/lens. With all focus points in play and cameras set to AI Servo (Canon) AF-C (Sony) the winner in grabbing focus quickly was the 7DMkII/Canon 100 macro with the A7RIV/Sony 90 macro a very close second (it was occasionally faster than the Canon). The A7RIV/Metabones/Canon 100 macro was a distant third (Which is why I got the 90 macro 12 months ago when I did the same test). When I changed to my preferred mode of shooting with each camera - AI Servo with Expand AF (Canon) and AF-C and Tracking Flexible Spot (Sony) - things changed. The A7RIV/Sony 90 macro was first grabbing focus fastest and holding it better than the 7DMkII which came a close second. The A7RIV/Metabones/Canon 100 macro came third. Points to consider: Before I switched to Sony the 7DMkII was by far the best low light focussing camera I had ever used. Depending on how you set up the autofocus system the A7RIV is better than the 7DMkII with their respective native macro lenses The effect of the Metabones adapter on focus performance will differ from lens to lens. While the Canon 100 macro is slower on the Metabones adapter my Canon 8-15 fisheye (for which there is no Sony equivalent) focusses much faster with the Metabones adapter on the A7RIV than it did on the 7DMkII.
  2. 6 points
    (28-60+WWL-1B) With Strobes: And finally, a few shots taken with strobes using the WWL-1B. The frogfish is an adult nearly the size of a dinner plate.
  3. 5 points
    In November I managed to steal an adventure from and otherwise difficult 2020. After getting Covid-19 tested, keeping a temperature log and donning two masks, I ventured to the Socorro Islands for the first time with the GH5 on the Solmar V. I head read all the report of camera housings getting taxed going through customs, but we got the green light when tapping the button and all was good! Spent 8 days aboard the Solmar V with masked crew and divers. The crew was happy to be back at sea again after being shut down for months. I was happy to be back in warm water. Below is the video of the adventure.
  4. 5 points
    last weekend we went dove the 'Flagpole' dive site in Hood canal, it is probably one of the best diving spot in that area, and behold, this easily wingspan 10 foot plus giant pacific octopus decided to come out of its den and say hi to us. absolutely once a life time experience for myself. shot on 1dx + retra strobs, WACP1 7-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 13-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 12-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 2-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr 1-1 by Joe Hua, on Flickr
  5. 5 points
    Hi, my name is Marcell Nikolausz. I’m a hobby underwater videographer originally from Hungary, living now in Germany. There was a recent discussion about the underrepresentation of videography topics at wetpixel. I also missed discussions about the lower budget video solutions. I’m very much interested in the latest and greatest tools the professionals are using, but those equipment are way beyond my budget and it’s true probably most of the readers of wetpixel. So I thought, I initiate a discussion about low-budget videography. Is it possible at all? I started with underwater videography already during the film era using a Minolta dynax 7000i in an Ikelite housing. That time the acceptable video quality was really expensive, while I could easily afford the same film David Doubilet used (but my photos were still crap in comparison but not because of the “sensor quality”). Especially wide angle video and proper lighting was achievable only for bigger film crews. Today, a cheap action camera has a better quality at a fraction of price what was available 20 years ago for professionals. I get into videography when I purchased a sony nex-5 and I explored that it has a video record button but I was not really hooked at the beginning. The real change happened when I got a GoPro HERO (entry level version of HERO 4, approx. 130 Euro) and started to play with it and decided to get more into videography. I watched many videos on youtube and vimeo but most of them were really bad with lots of shaky camera movements causing sea sickness on land. The other major problem I recognised was the bad colours but somehow I expected it. So I wanted to make completely different underwater films. I watched also many BBC documentaries and films from professionals. I especially liked the work of Howard Hall and it was clear that he used tripod a lot. So my first suggestion is to use some kind of tripod or some other kind of stabilization for your camera. My first solution was a flat rock. I glued a GoPro mount on it and attached my camera. I also tried joby gorillapod but it’s too light for such small cameras. My second solution was a modified aluminium tent-peg. (see picture below). Not much later I invested into a second camera. Instead of a top GoPro I bought the much cheaper Yi 4K (around 200 Euro that time). (It fits better to the low-budget videography). The camera choice will be the topic of a next post. Overall, it was really fun to use these cheap cameras and I created a short film that I entered to the actioncup video competition. It’s a German video competition focusing mainly on small cameras and it has a category for action cameras. My movie won the freshwater category. See the movie below (Sorry but the text is German but I hope you will watch it anyway): Overall the budget of this movie was around 400 Euro. One short footage from this was even used in a bigger TV film (broadcasted in Slovakia) Next post will be about low-budget but relatively good quality cameras.
  6. 5 points
    I am happy to share my latest video-interview with Max Ammer, the pioneer of diving in Raja Ampat, West Papua in Indonesia. About 30 years ago, Max came to Raja Ampat in a search of World War II relics. This is a story about how Max built the very first dive resort in Raja Ampat - Kri Eco Resort, and later - Sorido Bay Resort, about conservation efforts of Max and his partners, training local people and building the very first electrical boat in Raja Ampat. Video is shot with Sony NX80, and a few clips with Sony 7Rii. ENJOY. https://youtu.be/vcmAxOhLgEM
  7. 5 points
    Hi, I would like to share a video from my last trip to the river Traun. The river Traun is the most varied dive spot i know here in Austria. Mainly you dive in a dammed area of the Traun with moderate currents. There you can find a sunken pump room, 500 year old roads from the period of salt shipping, beautiful light under driftwood and under the trees at the shoreline and much more. If the conditions are good, its possible to dive the Canyon at the Traun waterfall. The dive gear has to be roped down, the scuba divers has to jump or climb down the steep rocks to enter the water. The Canyon offers a magic scenery with its washed out rock face, cascades and the crystal clear water of a spring pot Alex globaldivemedia.com
  8. 4 points
    I've done controlled tests before comparing DivePro 18k lights vs. the Gates GT14s and Keldan Luna 8s (13k lumen model). The tests are somewhat complicated by the fact that the DivePros' output is concentrated in a ~90 degree cone, similar to the Gates GT14s, while the Keldans are closer to 110 or 120 degrees. Because of this, the actual amount of light for the Keldan that falls upon the subject ends up being half what you get from the DivePro and the Gates GT14s. The difference between the Gates and DivePros was not measurable in fstops. So.. I wouldn't worry too much about the cheaper 'chinese' lights meaningfully exaggerating their light output. Keldan certainly has nicer controls and better reliability. My dive buddies and I have experienced issues with DivePro cannister lights in cold water (4 degrees) where multiple units just stopped working for no reason. Clearly, the quality control and testing under challenging conditions could use improvement. But in my view Keldan made a serious mistake by using dome ports on the front instead of flat ports. A 90 degree beam is more than enough for video unless you're filming with a fisheye. I note that the X-Lights also use a dome port, which is silly.
  9. 4 points
    I would like to see more video related contents. I think the platform is given, we, video content creators should just put more effort to share our experiences and discuss video-related topics here at wetpixel. I was not that active so far, but I'm planning to start a new topic on "Low-budget underwater videography".
  10. 4 points
    I have been ask a bunch of questions about all things A7C and today my 4000 word review has posted in UWPMAG.com issue #119. This is a free PDF download and I suggest you read the review if you have an interest in the Sony A7C. I intensely did my review using only the Sony FE 28-60mm "kit" lens with the WWL-1, WACP and one and two CMC-1 lenses. Some of the macro is in this thread. After reading the review I would be happy to answer any questions. The attached image is with the 28-60 at 28 using the WACP. This is an A/V light shot at ISO-400, F10, 1/125th sec.
  11. 4 points
    I recently took this shot on a trip to the Souther Great Barrier Reef. It is my best example of balancing flash & ambient so far. I put my lower strobe on a very low power setting tucked in close to the left handle and had the upper strobe on a high power at full rabbit ear position. Hope you enjoy looking as much as I did making it Thanks,
  12. 4 points
    Just did my first dive with the R5 and thought I'd share some sample footage (youtube links below). It's nothing special, just a few different scenes to give you a feel for the image quality. I have the camera in a Nauticam housing with ZEN 230mm dome, using the RF 15-35mm. Settings on all these videos: 4K 30p, HQ mode (oversampled from 8K), ALL-I compression, Canon Log on. Files were edited in Premiere and exported in maximum render quality. Footage was shot on St. Eustatius in the Dutch Caribbean. All videos are shot at around 70 ft depth, conditions were not great: it was an overcast day, still early in the morning, so not a lot of light or colors available at that depth. No artificial light was used, just ambient light. I used a white slate to manually white balance the footage, which is a bit of a hassle on the R5. Taking into account these low-light conditions, I think the camera produced some fantastic video. I am sure though the footage will be much more vibrant in shallow water with more sunlight. Interested to hear what you think. Happy to upload more footage with different settings next week if anyone is interested.
  13. 4 points
    I also mostly stayed close to home last year. Thankfully, the Buffalo National River is only 10 minutes away. These images of a River Cooter and Longear Sunfish were two of my favorites of the year:
  14. 4 points
    Very happy to see the return of this topic! My fave reflects my long-term salmon project that was influenced more by the weather that was excessively wet in 2020 and poor salmon runs than by covid. I took this shot during one of the few and short sunny spells in early July before any salmon had returned to this stream. I used a lens that I had used for this same purpose (juvenile salmon) but with film back in the 90s, the Nikonos RS 28mm. This was one of the lenses that Harald H brought with him to DEMA in '19 following the SEACAM mdification. I have used several other lenses for a similar purpose but was challenged by the nature of underwater optics. This lens has a much flatter field as well as being a sharper water-contact lens. Its small size also helped as the lens was not completely submerged due to the shallow water depth. Rocks on the bottom (get in the way) did not help either.
  15. 4 points
    Monterey, California. September 2020.
  16. 4 points
    Hi everyone, New member here, thought I'd introduce myself with some shots from my home country, Scotland. These recently featured in the Dive Photo Guide photographer of the week. Having some trouble linking images from elsewhere so here's a link to the article and a small sample. http://www.divephotoguide.com/underwater-photography-special-features/article/underwater-photographer-week-mark-kirkland
  17. 4 points
    Nice images, Adam. However, obviously it all depends upon one's situation and subject matter. Not everyone shoots large subjects in open water with artificial lighting. I'm normally shooting small subjects in shallow freshwater streams with natural lighting. And yes, many of my wide angle shots could not be gotten with a large dome. Here are a few examples with subjects less than an inch from a 4" dome (closer than a large dome could get) and/or with the housing pressed against the stream bottom (lower than a large dome could get):
  18. 4 points
    How about covering the opposite topic. Moving to smaller sensors and reasons to do so.
  19. 4 points
    I'm pro lanyard all the time. I clip on a coiled lanyard as soon as I splash. I have had to deal with critical safety and rescue scenarios more than once under water where there is no time for spare for the camera. Not having a lanyard already in place means you either don't deal with the emergency when needed most, or you lose the camera.
  20. 4 points
    For many years now I have been diving in the Mar Piccolo - Taranto (Italy) at all times of the year. I discovered this place 25 years ago thanks to the collaboration with a local scientific foundation and since then I have never missed an opportunity to return. In recent years, however, the summer temperature of the water reaches almost 30 degrees, creating great problems for the local fauna and flora. Many species move towards deeper waters and others, unable to move, end their cycle with a slow agony. I returned in these days and this little Mediterranean paradise is starting to revive.
  21. 4 points
    Here is an example I shot last week with a similar setup to yours, using a D850 / 15mm Sigma FE / 170mm port + Inon 330 strobes. The left strobe arm is 12+16+8 and the strobe is pointed inward from the upper left. The right strobe is closer in to the right an pointed forward. ISO 250 / F9 / 1/80s Left strobe is -1.5ev, right is -3ev. The water conditions in Puget Sound were relatively good by local standards at 25 foot visibility but this is heavily particulate water. I did not do any Spot removals of backscatter, but I did bring down to 0 to the Clarity/Texture (midtones) of the green water using LR. You can see there is hardly any distracting backscatter in the image. The point of using a lower strobe power is that you don't illuminate the backscatter nearly as much in poor clarity water. You can boost exposure in post processing to get the brightness you want for the image, selectively if needed. I shot at -1.5ev & -3ev which is about 1/3rd and 1/8th power for the two strobes. If I shot in these dark and chunky waters at Full or Half power the image would be blasted out. If you want a darker background use a faster shutter speed. 1/125 or 1/200. The strobes don't impact open water background color. Shutter speed controls ambient light.
  22. 4 points
    This is the final cut of my semester project for film class at the Academy for Creative Media Windward. Due to the COVID-19 shutdown I was reliant on b-roll that I filmed during an expedition to Cocos Island, Costa Rica in early March of 2020. This is not a "creature feature", more an experiential film to guide the viewer on a virtual dive in the Deep See submersible. Filmed aboard the Undersea Hunter Group’s M/V Argo, on location at Cocos Island, Costa Rica. Best viewed in 4k, with good speakers or headphones... -Brian
  23. 4 points
    Hi Divers Sadly we can't dive in Thailand these days and I miss it badly. But it's given me time to do something I've wanted to do for a long time, to rewatch and rank my favourite underwater documentaries. So I made a video about my top 10 favourites. What's your favourite? Check out my video:
  24. 4 points
    Cause I’m using the GH5s which lacks IBIS, I had to come up with a way to balance my rig to to make it feel like a traditional video cam rather than the DSLR restricted position. This setup up helps me avoid all types of roll, pitch and yow. It is not a final setup up but it is so balanced that I can let go of the camera midwater and it will just stay there :). I rely totally on the external monitor for all my needs: exposure/focus etc... I can adjust the camera vertically (lookup/down) by adjusting the DIY floors position.
  25. 3 points
    1) the WWL-1 does not come with a buoyancy collar. They sell a hard foam one. The 1B has a metal buoyancy collar that comes on it. If you get the 1(A?), I think you really want a buoyancy collar for it. AFAIK, the lens itself is the same. At least, optically speaking and how it mounts to your camera. 2) You don't need a focus gear - unless you want to use Manual focus. I don't have the focus gear for the 28-60 lens and I can't see myself ever needing it. For fine focus, I would be more likely to just let AF get it very close and then rock back and forth a little bit to adjust the fine focus. 3) If you want to use strobes, you need a strobe trigger. It doesn't have to be the Nauticam one. I am using a UWT (Underwater Technic) and would probably buy another one. It supports using TTL mode (which I have not used, but do intend to play with that soon). I tried a Trt S-Turtle trigger and had poor luck with it and Trt's customer service. I don't know if the Nauticam trigger supports TTL. You have to decide if you want that option (to be ABLE to use TTL) and then make sure the trigger you get does support it for your camera AND your strobes (if you want that option to be available to you). 4) You don't HAVE to have a vacuum valve, but it is highly advisable. The Nauticam one is working very well for me. I think BS or BW also has their own branded one, that you could go with. Which one is really up to you. The Nauticam housing should have a built-in moisture and vacuum detector. If you don't have a vacuum valve, then you won't be able to take advantage of the vacuum detector (which detects LOSS of vacuum). You'll only know if you have a leak when water gets in and sets off the moisture detector. A vacuum valve is cheap insurance for an expensive camera. 5) My Inon Z240s have been rock solid. I had a terrible time trying to make a new pair of Sea&Sea YS-D3s work for me and ultimately sold them. If you search around this forum, you'll find many others with the same complaints I had regarding using the S&S. People with offboard LED flash triggers (like you will have with an a7c) struggle to get the S&S strobes to fire reliably. People with cameras that have a built-in flash, generally have good luck. Also on the subject of strobes, my opinion is to buy the biggest/best you can afford. If/when you ever change camera systems, strobes will move right over. Unlike your housing, etc.. Strobes are an even more long-term investment than the camera itself. I'd take Inon Z330s over Inon D200s - unless you want the D200s for size/weight considerations. If necessary, I would even buy 1 Z330 over 2 D200s, to get started, then save up to buy a second Z330 later. 6) You don't HAVE to have a focus light at all. But, they really do help the camera focus more quickly and accurately in low light. I use my focus light all the time (for wide angle) and for small (but not macro-small) stuff. I haven't ventured into actual macro shooting yet. Fortunately, a focus light does not need to be expensive. Low power is better than high power. You don't need it to automatically turn off when the strobes fire. Strobes are so much brighter, a low powered focus light won't affect the picture when it stays on during the exposure. So, pretty much any small, low powered dive light will work just fine. I use a very inexpensive, relatively low-power video light as my focus light. It throws a nice wide beam, so I don't have to worry about aiming it precisely, and I can get focus lock on a subject, with tracking, and then recompose and my subject will still be illuminated to help the AF tracking.
  26. 3 points
    Between the onset of the Covid 19 storm and all the related lockdowns in the US, my travel plans for 2020 went to zip. Fortunately, I live in South Florida with the Palm Beach County coastline as my back yard, with allowed me to still undertake some really good diving in from Goliath groupers, sharks and blackwater. Here’s two from 2020.
  27. 3 points
    Yes, but believe me, he is rock steady. A human dolly. Just look at his old videos before GH5S. Here he experimented with shallow focus. Perfect lightning. He creates a lot of shadows enhancing 3D and super CC. Keep in minf he's at 80m freehand. No camera, no scooter.
  28. 3 points
    A video of my friend Claudio Valerio on a 70m deep shoal in Tuscany. No IBIS GH5S + Pana 9-18mm in Aquatica housing
  29. 3 points
    at 30" close-up shots with the Lumix 12-35 (24-70) at 35mm. It's impossible shooting video @70mm without IBIS
  30. 3 points
    To be honest, I don't see any difference in quality between the shot of the dolphins and the tiger shark. One doesn't look more clear or contrasty than the other, and there's nothing to say that the tiger shark is in focus and the dolphins are not. I think what you're seeing here as others have commented is the effect of 10'+ of water. Water is an awful filter that will destroy all contrast and resolution. The more of it you have between you and the subject, the worse the results. Both these shorts have subjects that are so distant that no lens or camera is going to make any difference in terms of the perceived contrast and resolution. If you're using any lens at 50mm+ (full frame equivalent) zoom to fill the frame with a pelagic subject, that means the subject is 15'+ feet away. You're not going to get good results in terms of sharpness and contrast with that much water between your lens and the subject regardless of how high quality your optics are. Most cameras are going to struggle with focus in such circumstances because the water column removes contrast. To reiterate, I don't think those two photos show that one lens is focusing on the subject properly and the other isn't. I'd say the focus is probably correct in both. I've tried various 14-42mm lenses on m43 behind the WWL-1, including the Oly 14-42 pancake. Differences are miniscule. I also ended up using the Panasonic 14-42mm II. Don't spend money upgrading your camera or optics for shots of large pelagics more than 15' away. You'll be dissapointed when your results do not improve. The only reason for using a focal length of 50mm+ underwater is to fill the frame with a smaller subject within 10' of your camera. Any further, and the results will be equally disappointing.
  31. 3 points
    Split level videography (half over, half underwater) This was a sub-project for me in 2019. I wanted some interesting, unusual footage in my competition video, so I decided to include some split level shootings. It is extra challenging for videography especially at low budget. It requires a dry dome port attached to the underwater housing. I bought a Shoot dome port (around 50 Euro). The selection of dome ports for GoPro was much wider but I found that the quality of these ports is quite similar. They’re acrylic ports without coatings so the reflection is a big issue. Actually I had to cover the inner part of dome (flat part around the camera lens) with a self-adhesive black tissue to reduce the reflection. Still, filming is only possible with the sun behind (and reflection of the lens itself is still an issue). Another issue is the poor dynamic range of the small sensors of the action cameras. The underwater part was always underexposed in real situations. Maybe it works in a pool but rarely in a lake or a river (maybe in very shallow water with lightish ground). I tried my video lamps to light the underwater part but it has negligible effect. Even for photography you need very powerful strobes and better to do it late afternoon. Finally I used two sheets of linear polarization filters. Depending on the angle relative to each other they let various amounts of lights through. I cut then small rectangular pieces of the double layer covering the upper part of the flat surface of the housing in front of the action camera lens. In this way I can darken the upper part compensating to the light difference above and under water. Examples for the results you can find here: Meanwhile a bought a gradual ND filter set (Cokin, approx. 10 Euro) and cut rectangular pieces out of it (it’s not glass but optical resin, so you can use a fine saw to cut it) that covers the flat part of the underwater housing in front of the camera lens. It’s a bit hit and miss to find the proper one (The set includes ND2, ND4, ND8 but only the last two make sense). Such videography requires a sturdy tripod and proper levelling should be checked. I usually have a live view on my phone. Water droplets cause also problems.
  32. 3 points
    Acrylic domes are generally very floaty, so moving to a glass dome will increase weight for travelling but improve handling underwater significantly. Generally, I think your pictures just demonstrate the age old of rule of getting closer in underwater photography. It's quite possible that with the Sony you will get better AF and also better image quality, but the first photos of distant dolphins and the shark will never look good even on the very best camera. The closer dolphins would probably also look pretty good with the WWL-1. In my opinion it is not really worth chasing after improvements on a type of shot, that will just never look good. On the other hand you should just do what brings you joy and if these are the type of shots you generally shoot, maybe it's worth it for you. Maybe also worth looking at the WACP.
  33. 3 points
    Regarding the idea that Sony APS-C cameras are a niche market for housing manufactures is perhaps misunderstood. Housings for A6300/6400/6500/6600 are available from most manufactures for all or some of these cameras. Manufactures include Fantasea, Ikelite, Isotta, Nauticam, Sea & Sea, Seafrogs and more. It would be more accurate to say niche manufactures like Seacan and Subal don't make housings for these cameras. Also Aquatica, Ikelite, Isotta, Nauticam and Sea & Sea have all listed an intent to support the coming Sony A-1 and I suspect Seacam and Subal will perhaps do the same. The Sony A-1 is surely more of a niche camera than the Sony A6000 series cameras. I fully understand the idea that a Sony user could show up on a vacation or workshop may be the only Sony user. I have been in that passion on a number of occasions and ended up helping others more than they needed to help me. Regarding size, most U/W photographers just like land photographers don't need or want to deal with large MP cameras in the 45-60+ megapixel range. I appears that 20-24MPs is the sweet spot for M43, APS-C and full frame for many cameras, including high speed sports cameras. It is also clear that FF cameras in the 20-24MP range out preform M43 and APS-C cameras in terms of image quality. It is clear that DSLR cameras will never be able to compete with mirrorless cameras in regard to size and the gap is widening. Take the new Fujifilm GFX 100S a 100+MP medium format camera which is 150X104X87MM and 900G v. The D850 at 146X124X78.5 and 915G. In addition Fujifilm has been able to reduce the size of the lenses v. past MF lenses. Lastly the new Sony A7c camera and 28-60mm zoom are just a glimpse into the future of mirrorless camera size. The full frame 24.2 BSI sensor camera that is smaller and lighter than the Olympus EM1 III, Comparing Nauticam housings the NA-A7C housing is smaller at 307/172/103 and 1.78kg v 305/175/116 and 2kg for EM1 III. I fully agree that the Sony full frame lenses are bigger and require larger ports. The system can however be used with the 45 port and WWL-1. The Sony 28-60mm zoom is the only full frame lens I am aware of that works with WWL-1, which is very well suited to the 24MP sensor. While the lens works great with the 61MP A7R IV and WACP realistically most users will opt for the WWL-1 simply because of cost just as they may select CMC closeup lenses over SMC C/U lenses. For macro the housing requires that same N100 macro port for the 90mm macro as is does for all of the Sony FF cameras. What is most important to come away with here is that the A7C and 28-60 zoom will likely not be the end of the story. I suspect that smaller FF lenses for this camera will be coming. I also see the ability for a future high res version of the camera. Images are of the already very small Sony A7R IV and Sony FE 28-70mm with the WACP and the A7C with the 28-60 and WWL-1.
  34. 3 points
    I have just downsized from NA-D800 to NA-Z50, a crop sensor mirrorless. The 9" glass dome I had is 3kg, the WWL-C is just over 1 kg. For fisheye I am using the Tokina 10-17 with manual focus in an 8" acrylic dome. Mostly I use it for over/under so manual focus is no disadvantage. I use f16 and focus at about 6m underwater. Yesterday I compared the 10-17 with the Nikkor 8-15 in a camera shop at f16, ISO 200 and a bean bag. I can't tell the difference. New eyes might be a better investment. I intend to get this whole process written up on UWP sometime, but here is a picture of the manual focus mechanism made from a toy helicopter main gear, some drainpipe, a pillar valve top and an Aquatica (with an A to N adapter) dome I didn't mind drilling a hole in.
  35. 3 points
    Night dives in the sandy beaches of Ibiza, in the Mediterranean sea are always a surprise, you can find species that it's imposssible to see during the daylight, this is why I love that kind of diving. SVF13022021083
  36. 3 points
    English subtitles - Subtítulos en español - 日本語字幕 The Formiche di Grosseto ("Ants of Grosseto") are three islets included in the Tuscan archipelago (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formiche_di_Grosseto). The discovery in 2016 of a garden of Savalia savaglia near the largest islet gave us the opportunity to learn more, with Prof. Carlo Cerrano, the peculiarities of this species and its ecological and biological value. The dives also highlighted a particular type of interaction between the two typical chromatic varieties known for Savalia savaglia. The observation opened new hypotheses on the complex growth strategies of this species. The opportunity provided by this type of exploration underlines how technical diving is a means and not an end. A set of tools that allow to extend the duration of our excursions, to approach demanding dives making them safer and more fun or, as in our case, an example of "citizen science" that is a collaboration between technical divers and scientists. Short bibliography: cutt.ly/Iko2OHp
  37. 3 points
    I post more photos from El Hierro, in the Canary Islands, Spain. I really beatiful island to go such in the water as in land. SVF04012021050 SVF05012021053 SVF10012021089
  38. 3 points
    I managed to squeeze in one trip to the Galapagos in Feb before locking down this year, so most of my diving has been local in Puget Sound near Seattle. Here are three of my favorites for the year: [Whale Shark at Darwin's Arch] [Giant Pacific Octopus in the Hood Canal WA USA] [Wolf Eels at Sunrise Beach, Gig Harbor WA, USA]
  39. 3 points
    Hi Chris, I will post the results here. I will receive YS-D3 after a week or so.
  40. 3 points
    Hello, here you are some pics of my last trip to El Hierro, in the Canary Islands, Spain. SVF11012021047 SVF05012021092 SVF05012021016
  41. 3 points
    San Jose Del Cabo . I just landed at SJD (Cabo San Lucas, Mexico) I thought it would be beneficial to the group to share my experiences. First off I am very a very experienced traveler and have cleared Mexican Customs at least 30 times. This time was just a bit different and not just because of Covid-19. At my check-in in the US I was directed to fill out an online questionnaire about my Covid-19 possible exposure. It also asked for what seat you were in and contact info (email and phone). I assume that this was for Contact tracing. I filled it out and took a screen cap of the QR code generated at the end of the questionnaire (thinking I might need it later).Waiting for the flight was uneventful. There was a whole lot of plexiglass up everywhere and not may stores or restaurants open in the terminal. There was a disturbing amount of single use plastics being utilized in the airline club (I asked the bartender to fill up my water bottle with her beverage gun and instead sh gave me 5 small plastic cups of water to pour into my bottle. Mask use was a high priority on the American Airlines flight that I was on. The person behind me was reminded twice to where his mask. Once off the plane we we all put onto a shuttle bus for the short trip to the terminal. The Bus was not as packed as some others I have been on, but there certainly wasn't any real attempt at social distancing. Prior to getting into the Immigration hall we had to fill out a form asking us if we had knowingly been exposed to Covid-19. This form asked me the same questions that I had answered on the online questionnaire. I filled it out and handed it to the agent. He looked it over, signed it, and handed it back to me. No one else ever asked for it. It wasn't scanned in or anything....so I'm, not really sure what the point was, but as a frequent traveler to Mexico, I am not surprised by this. After collecting my bags I headed to the Customs hall. When I handed in my customs form the agent asked me about my bags (3 checked bags and 2 carry on). She asked me what was inside the bags and I answered, truthfully, saying "1 is scuba gear, another is clothes and the last is for my camera." She asked how many cameras I had and I told her, truthfully, that I was traveling with 2. She then specifically asked me if I had a housing. I said "yes" (no point in lying about it). I was directed to a separate table in the hall where my carry-on bag and my UW camera bag were inspected. The Agents seemed only to be interested in my housing (a 4-5 year old Subal). They asked me very specific questions. They asked me how old it was and how much I could sell it for (not how much was it worth or how much I paid for it). When I was asked about how much I could sell if for I laughed and said that IF I could find someone to buy it I wouldn't expect to get more than $450USD for it. I asked them about what was going on and they informed me that since the value of what I was bringing in exceeded $500USD I was subject to a 19% duty. I told them that it wasn't for resale and I was going to be leaving with it. They said that it didn't matter. In my mind I see the dollars adding up (we all know how much a full UW photo kit costs). The agents stated that "it's not that much, don't worry". He went on to say that they just assume that the rest of the gear is valued at $500 and so I would only be responsible for the 19% on the housing (valued by me at $450). When i pushed back on this He changed the value to $350USD and informed me that I would have to pay around $57USD for the duty. Doing a quick time vs. money evaluation I agreed. I was then led into an office where a woman charged my credit card the $57USD. She also recorded the serial number off of my housing. I was given a receipt and a form (on which was a description of my housing and the serial number) that had both been stamped with some sort of official looking seal. The woman expressly told me to retain the receipt and the form as this was a one time fee and that as long as I had the same housing and the form, I would not be charged again. I repeated it back to her just to make sure that nothing was lost in translation. I then collected my bags and went outside the arrivals hall to brave the gauntlet of taxi drivers. Throughout the the entire experience the Mexican Customs agents were professional and polite. I have travelled in Mexico for years and am have had experiences with the "mordida" (bribe) and this had none of the feel of that. While I didn't like having to pay more money, it is their country and their rules. I felt the agent worked with me a bit and wasn't trying to take advantage of the situation; I travel with 4 strobes that are at least $800 a piece, never-mind the multiple dome ports and all the rest of the stuff that goes along with this crazy hobby. My advice to anyone dealing with a similar situation is to remain calm, remain respectful, and work with the agents to get to a reasonable number. Do not attempt to lie or conceal what you are traveling with...it won't end well for you. I hope this helps other travelers. Oh, I also asked my driver and the management at the hotel I am staying at prior to departure about what they plan to do about the upcoming Covid testing requirements for people returning to the US via air and they said that all of the hotels and resorts are working to have onsite rapid Covid testing for guests that conforms with the requirements of US health officials. I have faith that the Mexican toursim industry will be on top of this latest change. Stay safe.
  42. 3 points
    I am really happy with the Backscatter Mini + Snoot. It's the best addition to my camera gear in years. Previous snoot setups I tried were frustrating and difficult to aim and this is a relative breeze. Highly recommended. Here is an example shot of a Pacific Spiny Lumpsucker. Maybe 2-3cm long, shot with D850 & 105mm, Backscater Mini Snoot, SubSea +5 closeup lens. I don't love the "spotlight" effect of a bright circle on black so I add a little fill from an Inon 330 at about 1/8 power off to left the side. [ f/18, 1/250th, ISO 100]
  43. 3 points
    I got my a7s3 and Nauticam gear just before a big dive trip in the Caribbean in late November. Shot three Sony Profiles settings, sLog3/SGamut3.Cine, HGL3 and No profile. File format:XAVC S 4K at 60fps10 bit 4:2:2 for all profiles. Customize the C4 function for white balance (So I could execute WB in right hand UW and hold Grey slate and later chip chart with left hand). I used official Sony LUTs and Leeming LUTs in post for evaluation of clips. Will edit in FCP and finish color in Resolve. It was a well balanced neutrally buoyant rig with Keldan 4x Lights, red and blue filters were consistently used. I was hoping because of the lowlight capability of this sensor to shoot with no lights so as to not scare off fish. In field evaluation I sensed that just a bit of light made a huge difference in color accuracy and saturation. So after a 3 dive and no lights I shot the remaining 20+ dive with light. My takeaways: 1- Love the setup, would choose sLog3 if time in post permits CC, If not post time then I would go with no profile. You lose 1 maybe 1.5 stops of latitude but generally clips were nicely saturated and accurate. I understand some people think the sony color science is to be avoided but I saw no issues. In also I preferred Sonys LUTs over Leeming LUTs for 90% of the shots. Whats my experience in Video color science? 40Plus years surface shooting and a successful life doing so. UW shooting is just my hobby, 2- I used SDHD cards for the XAVC s 4K file format and they bogged down a Late 2013 Mac Pro with 32GB Ram and top end graphics cards. Had to use proxy's to not go crazy in post. I did buy and have tested the new Sony CFExpress Tough card and "I think" it performs well enough to be able to avoid proxies in post. This is because the CPU has to do less calculations than with a codec that has more compression. I did a surface shoot yesterday (Birds in Flight) using sLog3 S&Q settings for 120fps with XAVC S I 4K and I filled a 160GB card in well, not very long. Luckily I had a laptop to download to continue shooting. Take Away 2.1 if you want 120FPS you better mean it! Or have lotsa expensive cards. Moving them into post and seeing performance will take place in a couple days (I hope). Apologies on long post, but a couple further observations. Cost, yea I'd say camera "May" be a1/3 of the get in the water costs. so, lights and floats, buy the best you can. Housings often are sacrificed if you go for a new camera, but odd note here, I have an a7R4 and it goes in the a7s3 housing. Most of the buttons on the top work but the only button on the back at seemed to work was the Disp button. I am exceptionally happy with this my 3rd rig. Should be able to last the rest of my life. Knock on wood!
  44. 3 points
    One of the main reasons for me to use small dome ports is because the water is too shallow to use a large one. I have used the Seacam fisheye macro port FMP and wide port WP for this with the Nikkor 10.5, 16, and 8-15mm and Canon 8-15mm fisheye lenses. The WP is not made for fisheyes but when the fisheye lens used with it is focused very close, it will not vignette. The WP is also the least expensive Seacam dome and given that the ports are often scratched by rocks being tossed at them by my photo subjects need to be considered expendable. First attached shot shows a Sockeye Salmon pair preparing to spawn. The other pix show Sockeye Salmon gathered at the mouth of a creek located about 2 km away from where I am sitting. They are gathering here prior to final maturation to beach spawn in the lake around the mouth of the creek. I planned on staying here several hours to do the shoot..... The creek as you can see is very shallow - Pink Salmon spawn here. Even the FMP is too big to fully submerge at some some spawning locations in the creek. I have used this creek to do a number of tests over the years (because it is so close and fairly clear). Another type of small dome port about the same diameter as the port mount so looks like cylinder with a dome on the end made by Seacam was simply called dome port DP. They came in various lengths for different lenses. Alex Mustard mentioned a similar Subal port here a number of years ago. I have used my DP with macro focusing wide angles (the now long-discontinued 20-28mm f/1.8 Sigmas and the more recent Tamron 28/1.8 lens) and the Nikkor 60mm macro lens. The 20 in Nikon mount was used quite a bit with the D2X (i.e. APS-C or DX). I also have this in Canon mount but have only used it with the superdome (and 1D series full frame cameras). There is a curved field so smaller apertures should be used. In my experience the 60 macro with a DP is much better than using a flat port other than for night photography. I shot quite a few pix with this dome and the 60 near Kauai in 2019.
  45. 3 points
    Happy holiday and hopefully more diving in 2021 with better images for all wetpixel members. Great resource, information and help here for which thanks to all. Have a great 2021
  46. 3 points
    It's been 29 years since the great tragedy in Red Sea.
  47. 3 points
    I would like to relay an incident I had Christmas Day 2016. I was in Ambergris Caye Belize for a holiday dive trip. It was my 34th dive trip to Belize. I arrived in Belize on 12-22-16. On 12-23 I did two dives on one of the more remote sites there. same thing the next day. On Christmas morning I did a single morning dive with the plan of spending Christmas with my wife. After getting back to the dock i started getting very very tired. I thought I would go back to my room and rest for a while. My condition continued to go down hill. Anyway, We decided to go to dinner and that I would just rest the balance of the evening. Things really went down from there. After arriving at the dinner location I was having problems walking. It was like I was drunk. after that I found that I could not urinate. This could be a big issue after a few beers. I was also having vision issues in my left eye. We blew off the dinner and returned to our room to rest for the night. Around 9:00 PM I used my Sat phone to call Duke University in NC. They manage DAN. I spoke with a tech and then a doctor who told me I was in crisis and required a medical evac. My dive computer data was downloaded and sent to Duke. Wow the day just keeps getting better. Dan said they would get a specially equipped aircraft flown down to get me and medivac me to Miami. When I told them that I was in Belize they were happy as they had just opened a new chamber there a couple of months before my issue. I was told that they were assembling a medical team and they would pick me up at my hotel in 15 min. 10 mins later there was a knock at my door by the med team. They took me to the chamber where i was examined by the doctor. He told me I was suffering Neurological DCS stage 2. very serious. As they were loading me in the chamber the doctor told my wife, You husband is in critical condition and we will do the best we can for him. She freaked out of course. So Christmas night I spent 6 hours in the chamber with a nurse. The following morning I required another 4 1/2 hour treatment. After that the rest of the vaca was just hanging out. stay out of the sun and no beer. The moral of the story is. Buy your Dan insurance. Dan cost me $85.00 a year. They covered all expenses for my injury and medical treatments. They are dedicated to dive medicine and have an outstanding crew backed by state of the art research at Duke. I met a man who also had a DCS issue while in Belize. I was going in to thank the staff for saving my life and for their kindness. The man I met was going in to pay far his 4 hour chamber treatment with staff. He had to put $22000.00 US dollars on his credit card because he did not have the DAN insurance. My bill without the DAN ins would have been over $44000.00 THANK YOU DAN AND DUKE UNIVERSITY. Everyone be safe and use the DAN insurance. This incident has forced me to stop diving. spinal cord injury as a result. I could most likely continue diving but could not place my wife in that situation again. Best wishes to All Bryan
  48. 3 points
    AFAIK, the only strobes currently on the market that offer HSS capability are: SeaCam SeaFlash 60D and 160D - strobes can be triggered by sync cords or fiber optics, but HSS is available only when using sync cords, only with Canon and Nikon cameras, and Canon/Nikon support is strobe model-specific - i.e. there's an SKU that works with Canon, and another SKU that works with Nikon. On the upside, HSS is available in TTL and manual modes. Retra Prime and Retra Pro - fiber optic triggering only, HSS is available only in manual mode, requires an LED trigger board in the housing to supply the proper triggering signal. UWTechnics and TRT Electronics have triggers compatible with Canon, Nikon, Sony, Panasonic and Olympus cameras (separate SKUs for each manufacturer as they have different flash communication protocls); UWTechnics triggers are shaped to fit a specific housing, whereas TRT triggers are generic boxes that fit most housings.
  49. 3 points
    Not to open another HLG thread, I have found the time and worked on some HLG files that were sitting on my hard drive since 2018. There are nothing special in terms of content or editing but I just wanted to see how they behave and how much I can push them. These were graded and edited on REC 2100 HLG color space and gamut on the free version of Davinci Resolve using only the scopes as reference as I dont have an HDR monitor. No secret sauce on exporting etc, just followed youtube recommendations for HDR content. I intentionally pushed the files way more that I normally do to have an idea of how much they can be abused and to my surprise and contrary to what I read they handled it well. If this is was a commercial shoot I would have pushed way less the footage to make it more compatible for SDR devices. If you are watching on an SDR monitor you will notice the abuse more but it is only a matter of the monitor color space, watch it in an HDR tv and you ll see the difference. For sure there is more room to play with as HDR and its workflow still holds secrets and requires some extra equipment but I think if you are a bit careful when shooting the footage HLG is a viable and quick solution to have HDR and acceptable SDR content. PS not LUTS have been used or abused during the making of this clip
  50. 3 points
    Hi all, Here I am with my latest effort. You have English and Spanish subtitles Bottom trawling is the most common and destructive fishing practices in the Mediterranean Sea. Bottom trawling represents a major threat to the seafloor ecosystem. Yet soft bottoms are not desolate stretches of sand but complex ecosystems, populated by organisms that are fundamental to the conservation of fish stocks. Giannutri island, part of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park, is a good example of intact marine environments. The fishing ban up to three miles has preserved intact deep habitats and the particular morphology of the island's seabed allows divers to reach the "twilight zone" (i.e. he bathymetric range between 50 and 120 meters.) in a rather simple way. Trimix, DPVs and rebreathers are perfect tools for observing still extremely intact deep environments with less invasiveness. These protected areas suggests how protection, if properly managed, can effectively maintain integrity in environments that host hundred or thousands years old organisms and provide us with natural laboratories where we can study what these environments would be like if they had not been damaged by human activities. On a technical perspective An alternative title of the video could be "History of Panasonic underwater". In the video there are shots taken over many years with my GH2, GH3, GH4 and GH5. So from a technical point of view I'm not at all satisfied with the quality of the footage which in some cases I consider to be very bad. I'm not a professional; I have witnessed some phenomena in a completely unexpected way, with the poor beloved GH2 at 100 meters in winter sea at 1250 ISO or at the end of a dive with flat light batteries. The important thing for me was to be able to communicate a message.. Bye

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