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pygmy_whaleshark

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About pygmy_whaleshark

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  1. Your current camera just won't work well, and won't be practical. There appears to be only that Meikon/Seafrogs housing option, so you're stuck with the 50mm max lens, and that's not going to maximize your macro potential due to modest magnification. You can't use a true macro lens since there's no housing option that will let you swap ports and lenses. Next, you'll have to pay at least $250 for a flash trigger to mount in the hotshoe and work the strobes. If you already have a compact attachment flash, that could work but will eat up batteries quickly. And you'll need to buy a wet lens adapter to use the Macro diopters on that square housing port. Not sure if they'll work for wide angle lenses also, but that would be a very unstable, precarious setup. So not only will you spend another $150-200 here, you may still not even be able to use wide angle wet lenses, but if you don't care about WA then it doesn't matter. For comparison, you can probably find a good used RX100 or G7X setup for well under $1000, which will get you a camera, housing and tray+handles, and maybe even arms. I would estimate that camera + housing is about a $500-600 expense, if you want to compare it to keeping your current camera + buying housing, TTL trigger and wet lens adapter. Btw, one last option, if you already have the Fuji lenses and want to get best quality, is to buy another Fuji body that has better housing selection. I took a quick look ant XT 2 through XT4 seem to have good options. You can possibly find a used body + housing but definitely will cost you much more than something like RX100. You'll have to pay for ports possible, etc.
  2. I used to use the INON bayonet mount, which also had the lock. Guess what a quick accidental twist during a strong current caused me to lose the lens once, and I only found out when I drifted too far away. I've never found the need to constantly swap wide/ macro wet lenses on any dive, so I just screw them in now.
  3. Highly recommend NOT mounting anything on hotshoe. It will get loose at the worst moment and fall off, sometimes when you don't notice. Speaking from personal experience, I now nail down tight all lights via clamps / screws, and don't even use bayonet mounts for wide angle wet lenses.
  4. I don't have the housing for my Canon yet. I'm diving with RX100 for now but thinking of stepping up. I brought this up to see if anyone already has used it and has pics to share, since I'm aware of all the technical details and pros/cons. 24-70mm has a few meters of max focus distance at the macro end, so it won't be an issue.
  5. For blackwater, lighting isn't an issue since strobes can be put right on the sides of the port. Side lighting is best for most of the transparent critters anyway. I do have the 24-70mm, hence I did all the sizing comparisons and at full extension it's maybe 5mm longer than 100m, but there's a range in the macro region of the zoom ring, where it can be made exactly same length.
  6. I'm talking about locking it in Macro mode, and using it strictly for that. And the reduced working distance is the whole point if you see my comment. It's to reduce the chance of particles in the water between the subject, which is often a problem on night or blackwater dives.
  7. I have both, the CMC-1 gives slightly bigger subject size, but I'm on a compact RX100, so for me it all matters. It's a difference between a 30mm vs 25mm wide subject width. Remember that diopters don't magnify anything, they simply allow closer focusing. Magnification comes from the higher focal length of the lens on your camera. If you're diving with a basic zoom lens, perhaps you should get the Olympus 60mm instead, and a +5 diopter. That'll give you much better results.
  8. The CMC will be useless on most interchangeable lens cameras, since their front element is too big. You maybe can get away with it on M4/3 like Olympus. If you step up to newer RX100 (up to V), they're 24mm at wide end, so you'll need new wet lens to avoid vignetting. And you'll lose some magnification at the zoom end since it's 70mm equivalent. All newer RX100 have a 24-200mm equivalent range and the lens barrel shifts so much that you can forget about using wide or macro on same dive. You'll now have to deal with interchangeable ports. I never went past RX100 II as the image quality doesn't get any better. You maybe gain better video capabilities. I looked into this extensively and I don't think there's any intermediate jump. Even with M43 cameras, you have to invest in relatively bulky housing, new lenses, ports, etc.. Only think you can salvage from current setup is arms and lighting, and possibly the tray. The weight/size and cost of even M43 is not that far off from most full-frame or APSC, so may as well go all the way, or settle for a 2-3rd generation camera to save on body + housing costs. An APSC Nikon or Canon can work very well with cheap second hand or refurbished lenses and housing.
  9. Reviving this old thread. Has anyone tried to use the Canon 24-70 F4 at the Macro end? It wouldn't be full 1:1 macro, but it has much closer minimum focus distance which could be a benefit to avoid backscatter. This is prompted by a recent wetpixel youtube where it was suggested closer focusing is of benefit. Fully extended, the lens is about same length as 100mm F2.8, roughly same diameter so maybe even the same port could work. On a crop sensor it would even be full macro magnification.
  10. Hi! I'm from Austin, TX, got into diving for the photography and looking forward to diving again soon, when travel abroad is easier.
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