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segal3

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Posts posted by segal3


  1. ...the white text overwrites itself alot when viewed in Apple's Safari browser.....

    I know :)...I've been meaning to fix that for some time now...every browser but Safari deals with the site correctly <_ ...but i appreciate knowing it still broken src="%7B___base_url___%7D/uploads/emoticons/default_sad.png" alt=":(">


  2. For the last few years, I've traveled to Maui to spend the Thanksgiving holiday - it's just starting to get cold in LA, and it's a short flight to a convenient, tropical destination.

     

    The diving conditions weren't great - there was a strong current around many of the sites that I had intended to dive, so we ended up at the back wall of Molokini at least four or five times. The recent earthquake shook loose a fair amount of rocks off the side of the crater, tearing out some of the coral below the surface, and leaving many rocks balanced precariously on shallow ledges. Remind yourself to keep an eye out for falling debris... :)

     

    A few photos to whet the appetite...finals start next week, so it might be some time before the rest show up.

     

    This one's still aRGB - when will all browsers support color profiles? I won't comment on the fin posture :)

    maui06_1.jpg

     

    My first harlequin! :) Actually, there was a male/female pair, but the DMs seem concerned with moving us around, so I never had a chance to get the two of them in the same shot.

    maui06_2.jpg

     

    Pencil urchins everywhere...this is around 60ft depth to give an idea of the visibility.

    maui06_3.jpg

     

    I think I saw more nudibranchs on one dive this trip than I had seen in the last three years in Maui...not a bad thing.

    maui06_4.jpg

     

    Despite my familiarity with the area, it seems there's always something I haven't seen or photographed before. I can't complain. Always appreciate comments or strong criticism :D


  3. Thanks guys. Sorry Luiz, my posts don't usually focus on ichthyology alone ;).

     

    Cor - I was reading that a few hours ago after I noticed you were back :(. Did you notice any major differences between the June (winter) and November (summer) trips in terms of fish life or species diversity?


  4. The point being that singular blame should not be placed on an administration that is only following (in this case) the example of the previous one.

     

    An interesting note here is that the host of the Kyoto Protocal, Japan, has already exceeded its bluefin tuna catch for the year, and was found to have "illegally caught up to $6 billion worth of fish." Additional loss of top-predator species like whales and sharks caused by smaller nations is also a major contributor to the instability of marine ecosystems.

     

    The full report has been made available on Science's website.


  5. for those of you who haven't been on a trip with Stan its quite a blast. he has such a friendly outgoing personality and his stories around the salon after dinner are fantastic. He shows bits and pieces of some old and some new stuff and he never tires of speaking with everyone on the trips.

     

    I would suggest getting on a trip with him soon, you won't regret it.

    I agree with Mike - I was on the Bilikiki with Stan this last summer, and the stories he could tell and movies we would watch night after night were remarkable. A legend in the world of diving.


  6. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6108414.stm

     

    A new report by American and Canadian researchers published in the journal Science predicts the loss of all fish and seafood species by 2048. The data collected strengthens the link between protection being granted to ocean areas and the restoration of fish species.

    Experiments performed in small, relatively contained ecosystems show that reductions in diversity tend to bring reductions in the size and robustness of local fish stocks. This implies that loss of biodiversity is driving the declines in fish stocks seen in the large-scale studies.

     

    The final part of the jigsaw is data from areas where fishing has been banned or heavily restricted.

     

    These show that protection brings back biodiversity within the zone, and restores populations of fish just outside.

    It is never too late to try to change the current policies on (over)fishing.

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