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segal3

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Posts posted by segal3


  1. I suppose my concern is based on my ignorance of how significant these trails are, and of what the current predation situation is in the area.

     

    Cutting trails changes that dynamic, as it allows the predators to move along larger areas in a shorter amount of time, expending less energy, and increasing their hunting range.

     

    They should all have GPS...it's not as if they need a 10ft wide trail to find their way back to the dropoff/pickup point.

     

    ~Matt Segal


  2. One hopes that we have learned from the past and will do our best to protect the location and all of its species...

     

    "The scientists cut two trails about four kilometers (2.5 miles) long, leaving vast tracts still to be explored."

     

    Nevermind :angry:

     

    ~Matt Segal


  3. This is a very minor issue...but the forum time seems to be off a good 20 minutes or so. It's thrown me a couple times when I see people reply to posts before I posted them, or so I thought...

     

    ~Matt Segal


  4. From: Backside of Anacapa Island, Channel Islands, CA

    Date: January 28th, 2006

    Locale: High-current/surge outcrop

     

    This is by far *the* strangest thing I've ever seen underwater. To begin, yes, it was bright blue, even underwater. Secondly, it was tiny. The photo below (uncropped) is between 1:1-1:1.5. Third, yes, it is actually alive (it had such similarity to some topside beetles that I watched carefully for a few minutues, it did move and scratch at things). What I did *not* notice underwater, however, was that it's legs are bright yellow, in stark contrast to its body.

     

    Everyone else was watching the sea lions :)

     

    Appears crustacean-based...I wish I had more magnification for this shot...it was nestled right in a little dimple in an outcropped, very high surge back and forth. This first photo is uncropped, between 1:1-1:1.5 to give you an idea of scale.

    wtf1.jpg

     

    This second photo is the same as the first, except it is cropped.

    wtf2.jpg

     

    So, anyone? What is this thing? (And no, I'm not asking about the caprellid a cm or two below it that can be seen in the first photo... :D ) Leslie has mentioned that she thinks it may be a "podocerid amphipod", but any other ideas?

     

    More to come about the Anacapa trip once I have some time to edit some photos...

     

    ~Matt Segal


  5. I know...it never ends <_ src="%7B___base_url___%7D/uploads/emoticons/default_rolleyes.gif" alt=":rolleyes:">

     

    _MG_5770_16.jpg

     

    ^--Looks similar to Periclimenes tenuipes, but everything doesn't match up (not as transparent, and no lines connecting eyes). The chelipeds are orange-tipped as they are in P. tenuipes however...

     

    _MG_5796_16.jpg

     

    ^--Similar to Urocaridella antonbruunii but eye color is wrong, and banding is different...

     

    _MG_4788_04.jpg

     

    ^--Resembles Xenocarcinus conicus but has a longer rostrum (or so it seems)...

     

    _MG_6254_23.jpg

     

    ^--Similar to Periclimenes amboinensis but the patterning is off.

     

    Good luck :)

     

    I really need a more dedicated book for these IDs...

     

    ~Matt Segal


  6. _MG_0763_01w.jpg

     

    French Polynesia 2005 Gallery

     

    I had the opportunity to take a cruise with my family through French Polynesia, with landings in the Society Islands, the Tuamotus, and the Marquesas.

     

    I only had the chance to make five dives, and in every one, the divemaster believed that everyone would see more by swimming faster...needless to say, this made photography difficult. In addition, prior to every dive, either the ship DM or local operator DM would emphatically tell me what I would see and what to shoot (between wide angle and macro), and in every case, the dive turned out to showcase the opposite of what they had recommended.

     

    If I ever returned to the area, it would be to Nuku Hiva (of the Marquesas), where on one dive, I found a variety of species, including Lysmata amboinensis cleaner shrimp with eels, dragon morays, pipefish, dragonets, lionfish, scorpionfish, octopus, and all manner of gobies and blennies...this being just a single dive. Of course, this was when w/a was recommended. Next time, perhaps...

     

    As a result, I have, for the first time, intermixed the diving and topside photography. Hope no one minds :lol: . And sorry for the plethora of anemonefish... :lol:

     

    French Polynesia 2005 Gallery

     

    Enjoy.

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