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segal3

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Posts posted by segal3


  1. Went on the Peace boat yesterday to Anacapa Island, full of people and photographers. Two of the people on the boat were LAUPS members, a Todd Winner and a woman whose name escapes me right now. Regardless, the trip to Anacapa was fairly uneventful, but that water was *cold*. Coming up from my first dive shivering, I was about to move up onto the swim step when I noticed boots sticking out over the ladder. A middle-aged man was down on the deck, smothered in blankets and being given oxygen. Apparently, he had in some manner become unconscious underwater and had popped to the surface. By this time, USCG had been called and they showed up in no less than 10min. They didn't have the equipment necessary, and it was determined that the individual would need a helicopter evacuation, eta of 5 minutes. We spent the better part of an hour getting the guy airlifted, but it was for the best when we heard by the end of the day that he was going to be ok.

     

    In terms of the diving - cold, but great critters. Insane amounts of Spanish Shawl nudibranchs (every 10ft, if not more), with their eggs everywhere, and a few other types of nudibranchs I hadn't seen much of previously. Lots of Painted Greenlings and Crevice Kelpfish as well that were willing to pose. The sun didn't cooperate, so I stuck with macro the whole day, and I'm happy with a few of the shots I came away with. Here's a sampler:

     

    march17th1.jpg

    20D, 100mm, 1/160, f/11, ISO100, FF

     

    Disclaimer: WB may be *completely* off in this photo. I'm away from my calibrated monitor and my primary editing computer...notice the different copyright :D

     

    Enjoy.

     

    ~Matt Segal


  2. I think the most important part of shooting a sunburst (sunball with sunrays), is recognizing the conditions that it will happen. The rays themselves are not at all the brightest portion of the shot, by orders of magnitude - as a result, as one goes deeper, the chances of capturing the sunrays diminish. Additionally, the rays are often created by a mere turbulance on top of the water, a simple swell action. It is important to keep an eye on the surface on occassion - when the rays appear, you will know.

     

    _MG_1957_5w.jpg

    1/400, f/18, 18-55mm @ 21mm

     

    This jellyfish was shot extremely shallow, perhaps at 10-15ft depth. Notice that the image exhibits the hint of possible rays, but degrades into a sunball both because it was allowed to bloom a little more than normal, as well as the surface conditions.

     

    _MG_2446_4w.jpg

    1/320, f22, 18-55mm @ 33mm

     

    I'm not sure what category this falls into. The sunrays are not at all like they usually are - one individual described the wisps and tendrils of light as "god's fire." At the time (while shooting kelp), I noticed a change in the light coming down, and looking up, saw dancing rays on the surface. I feel this is the best time to shoot for a sunburst. It does help if there is some manner of particulate matter in the water for the light to reflect off of...in the clearest blue tropical waters, you may never record sunrays, or only very rarely.

     

    _MG_2769_2w.jpg

    1/250, f/18, 18-55mm @ 18mm

     

    Silhouettes, or partial silhouettes, are perhaps the easiest to do against the sun. Notice however that it is not always necessary to use the subject to block the sun. In some cases, this may be impossible - in an extremely bright day, the subject can be lost inside the glare and washout caused by shooting straight at the sun, even underwater.

     

    Make sure to remember that you may be limited in your exposure choice if you want to add strobe -lit foregrounds. The previous photos were all ambient light.

     

    Digital sensors have reached a point where they too can capture the finer details of a transistion from the deepest blue of the ocean to the white overexposure of a sunburst. It's up to you to experiment...


  3. In terms of the picture you put up Alex, I would say that a sunburst has sunrays, whereas a sunball does not. It would then be incorrect to call any such picture of the sun a sunburst...In the picture from the D2X review, however, the absence of rays would leave you with a sunball.

     

    Literally, the words have different meanings...it's difficult for me to think of using them interchangeably.

     

    ~Matt Segal


  4. Recently on this site I've noticed the words sunburst and sunball thrown around somewhat loosely to describe various images...and yet often the images I see them describe really could be better titled by the other word...

     

    For example, this is what I take to be a sunball:

     

    _MG_2378_4w.jpg

     

    Had a better picture from PNG, but that's on my other computer in my dorm (on spring break so that one isn't exactly reachable right now :D )...either way, the *sunball* would be a generally uniform, brightly lit shape that can clearly be known as the sun, but is only a light spot.

     

    This, on the other hand, would be a sunburst:

     

    _MG_2769_2w.jpg

     

    The rays are clearly defined, and the sun can be seen to be "bursting" from a central point, spreading over the picture.

     

    What are your thoughts? I'm trying to get a feel on what other people think of when either of the two words is mentioned...another example of a sunburst would've been the old Wetpixel main image...

     

    ~Matt Segal


  5. I just love these sunbursts :blink: I let this one "burst" just a bit more than usual...I felt it worked for the composition...

     

    Funny how *all* these fish disappeared just before the sea lions came roaring in...

     

    kelpburst.jpg

    20D, 1/250, f/13, ISO100, 18-55mm kit lens @ 18mm

     

    ~Matt Segal


  6. I am a firefox 1.0 user in xp sp2.

    When I am surfing the ever surfable wetpixel forums until the new release when I clicked back .. not only did I return to the page I had been on ... but I also returned to the area I had been looking at. I long multi paged posts this was very usefull. ;)

    Now when I click the back button in my browser (or my easy gestures wheel, or my keyboard etc etc :D ) I do go back a page as suspected I should, but I return to the top of the page ... and most the time thats not where i want to me .. and I have to scroll down ... or pg down ... How does that change ?

     

    It's Firefox that does that - not site dependent. I've lived with it for awhile...minor annoyance.

     

    ~Matt Segal


  7. This is my second attempt at this post.  The first time it showed the new thread, with my post at the bottom, and then it went away...

     

    This is very strange...I replied to your initial post...I guess both of ours disappeared? <_>

     

    Eric!!! :D

     

    I don't think I ever had an account over at digital diver.  I went over and tried to get it to send me a new password, and it says it never heard of no "derway"...

     

    I PMed John, not you. ;)

     

    So anyway, what's up?

     

    Diving this Saturday on the Explorer (CalBoatDiving) to Santa Cruz/Anacapa...you ever do any local stuff?

     

    ~Matt Segal


  8. If the write speed is faster, then the frame rate should be faster, all other things being the same. Shouldn't it?

     

    I am but a young grasshopper :)

     

    From http://www.wetpixel.com/modules.php?op=mod...os+canon+series

    I think it's condemning if the S3's DR is matched by a conventional 8MP camera and the street price of the 1DMk2 has dropped.  It's a far better camera in every other way.  The price difference goes into a very expensive body.

     

    I don't think the point is what's better for F-mount.  I think the point is why botther with a dual photosite design if it can't outperform a conventional sensor?  Fuji's sensor tech doesn't seem to be superior and it software and ergonomics are apparently substandard.  It may be the best available for F-mount for under $4000 but it seems very exposed to me.

     

    That isn't quite fair. The sensor on 1DMkII has more than 1.5x larger area. If Fuji can get the same resolution and DR, then their scheme has some merit. Because the CCD has to read out in series, they'll never be able to do 8 frames per second (this is probably the main reason Nikon has gone to CMOS for their pro camera, and Canon understood this earlier and got a technology jump on Nikon) . However, they probably can make the rest of it faster with a better processing and memory.

     

    ~Matt Segal

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