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reefwalker

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About reefwalker

  • Rank
    Triggerfish
  • Birthday 06/01/1958

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://reefwreckandcritter.com
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Indonesia from Western Australia
  • Interests
    Exploring the Underwater World and taking photos.

Additional Info

  • Show Country Flag:
    Australia
  • Camera Model & Brand
    Oly EPL6
  • Camera Housing
    Oly PT-EP10
  • Strobe/Lighting Model & Brand
    Inon Z220 x3
  • Accessories
    Locline Arms, Reefimages Macro Wet Lenses & LED Focus Light, BluSnoot Fiber Optic Snoot
  1. Announcing another of our very popular Dive/Photo Trips for October/November 2015. This trip begins in Bali where we fly to Flores to start our live-board trip through the central and northern regions of the Komodo National Park. We explore the very best macro and wide angle photo opportunities of this very rich area. From sea fleas to manta rays, from tiny nudibranchs to massive schools of pelagics. We know these waters well enough to make every dive a photographic dream. From Komodo we head west to Gili Banta for more remote reefs, then Sangeang Island an active volcano with some of the best black sand macro dives in Indonesia. Further west we explore Sumbawa Island's coastal reefs and finish in the muck dive heaven of Bima Bay. Here we have found nearly every sought after critter for photographers, blue ring octopus, wunderpuss, mimic octopus, frogfish, coleman shrimps, devil scorpionfish, stonefish, juvenile batfish, nudibranchs in every shape and size.... the list goes on! This trip is organised once per year around the best weather, tide and dive conditions for this area. The trip is inclusive of airfares from Bali to Flores & Sumbawa to Bali. 10 days/9 nights on the live-board, all meals, diving and twin shared air-conditioned accommodation on the live-aboard. Join other keen underwater photographers and get personal free help with your photography and post editing with Australian photo journalist Jeff Mullins. Dates are October 31 to November 9. Cost is USD$3490. Check out full details on our website at: http://www.reefwreckandcritter.com/flores-to-sumbawa-trip-information.html or contact us via email at: reefimages@ii.net The trip currently has only 4 vacancies. NOTE: On our November 2014 trip we found and photographed 4 of the rare nudibranch Melibe colemani (Coleman's Melibe). In 2015 we will be visiting these same dive sites to search and photograph them again!
  2. In September this year, we are escorting a mixed group of keen u/w photographers on a live aboard trip to Cenderawasih Bay, Indonesia to photograph the friendly whale sharks in this huge bay in West Papua. We also dive on remote atolls & reefs, some fantastic rarely dived WWII Japanese shipwrecks and even some muck dives. The trip currently has only 2 vacancies (1 twin share cabin). Price Includes all domestic flights from Bali, 7 full days diving on the liveaboard. USD$3280 ex Bali 13th September to 21st Septemner 2015. We offer FREE underwater photo help and informal photo editing instruction for anyone wanting assistance. Join us on the adventure of a lifetime in West Papua, Indonesia. For full details visit our website: Cenderawasih Bay - Whale Shark Photography Cruise in West Papua - Reef Wreck & Critter
  3. Hi Ken Bangka Island has a great mix of macro and wide angle subjects, as there are reefs and sand bottoms. To me the great attraction there are the soft coral coated pinnacles and fish life which make great wide angle subjects. Lembeh is great muck diving with amazing creatures, and I rate it as the best over-all muck diving for critters in Indonesia. Tulamben is a special place as it has great muck diving (but not as good as Lembeh), plus a fantastic wreck and wide angle sites at various spots along the coast, plus nearly all of the dive sites are easy shore entries. As for my favorite place for rare critters, it has to be Lembeh as it here you will find creatures like flamboyant cuttlefish & striated fogfish & hairy frogfish. You can't find these in Tulamben. Then again I love Komodo, with its manta's, muck diving and beautiful reefs loaded with pelagics. Actually my favorite place is Indonesia, that's why I live here :-)
  4. Hi Decimal 86 With the 9-18mm Oly lens and Zen Dome, I shoot in manual mode (M), start with a shutter speed of 1/125th, Aperture F8, internal strobe set to lowest manual power (to trigger the Inon's), fit diffusers to Inon's, strobes out wide and set back and pointing slightly outward - set to around 3/4 of full power, ISO200, White Balance Manual 5800 degrees Kelvin, RAW image Quality, Centre Focus, Live View Boost ON. Note: to vary exposure, remember this - Strobe Power changes the foreground exposure, Shutter Speed changes the background (natural light) exposure, Aperture & ISO change the overall exposure (Background and Foreground). Hope this helps?
  5. I recently changed my way of thinking and stepped from shooting with a dSLR to an Olympus PEN (EPL2). I am very impressed with the system, its size, its ergonomics and its photographic capabilities and have posted my first photos to my Flickr account. A couple of weeks ago I also started a new group on Flickr named Underwater Micro Four Thirds. Anyone is welcome to join, and feel free to upload photos taken with your Micro Four Thirds camera's (Olympus or Panasonic).
  6. I have had quite a few people bring Canon Compact Housings to me for help over the last couple of years, as they have had small leaks for no apparent reason. These housings have mostly been the G7, G9, G10, G11, A610, A620, A630, A640, A710, A720. What I have found on close inspection is that there are 3 or 4 mould release lines (no. of lines depending on the model) in the main ‘o’ ring groove on the door. These ‘lines’ run across the groove and very obviously would stop the ‘o’ ring seating in the groove correctly. It seems that most people have leaks in the shallows with their Canon housings. Either on descending or after a deeper dive with no problem, a leak is evident as they ascend into the last 10 meters. This is typical of an ‘o’ ring that has not seated correctly, so that’s why I started looking closer. I had one desperate photographer who wanted me to try anything to have their housing fixed. So I promised to find the leak source. It was a Canon G9 housing, I could see the water entering the housing as a very small drip that ran down the ‘O’ Ring until it pooled at the bottom. I decided to sand the Mould Release line, as this was exactly where the drip eminated from. I used a piece of very fine wet&dry;sand paper (600 grit), I wrapped a small piece around a small aluminium ruler (about 2mm thick), then gently sanded the mould release line, until it was level with the bottom of the groove. I actually did the sanding a step at a time and inspected the progress with a magnifying glass (Actually I used a ReefNet SubSee Magnifier, as it was stronger than a magnifying glass) and progressed until the mould release line was finally non-existent and the ‘O’ Ring groove had a flat bottom, rather than a step at the Mould Release line. It was quite easy to see the problem with a magnifying glass before sanding, and that it was smooth after the sanding. I also sanded the other 3 mould release lines in this particular housing, as they also were raised more than they should be. I was so confident that I had fixed the problem, I took the housing with its camera on a dive immediately after fixing it, and it was dry as a bone.... which it hadn’t been for quite a few prior dives. It has since proved to be perfectly sealed and hasn’t leaked on lots of dives since the modification. Check-out your own housing if it has these mould release lines, I’d get it fixed pretty soon. *UPDATE* I have now fixed more Canon Housings and all have been successful. I have also just fixed a G11 housing that leaked on its first dive, it had exactly the same problem. It also explains to me why some housings leak and some don’t. This mould release line is more evident in some housings than others. BTW, I also manufacture an electronic Leak Detector for the Canon G7, G9, G10 & now G11 housings for extra peace of mind - see my website at: UWleakdetector.com Photos & Sketch following so you can see how to do this work yourself. First Pic shows one end of the door, with Two Lines marked with arrows. The other end of the door also has two lines in the same positions. I have found that the one shown here on the Left is the one that causes most leaks, but its easy to fix all 4 while you have the sand paper out ! Second Pic shows a close-up of the Left Hand “Mould Release Line”. When it is sanded this line is no longer visible, and you can’t feel it when a toothpick is run along the groove. I have now heard from around 15 people that I did this modification too their housings, and all have done plenty of dives with absolutely NO LEAKS. P.S. Please don’t ask me if I can fix your housing “Mould Release Lines”, it is so very easy to do yourself. Following is a sketch to show you the details on how to do the work:
  7. Thanks for everyones interest in this trip. It is now full. Contact us for future trips.
  8. Hi Jcdignan You may notice it wasn't me that started this thread! I was simply clarifying that my Leak Detector doesn't consist of US$3 worth of material. It also isn't a board, a transistor, a buzzer and a cell. It's actually a whole lot more than this! Plus not everyone is handy with electronics and soldering etc. so these people can buy a pre-made item and fit it themselves. I think its great that this DIY forum is here for people to save money by doing it themselves. I am a DIY guy myself. Which is how I came to manufacture the Leak Detector. I made one for a friend and then one for myself. Now I've made hundreds for other happy customers around the World who want a fit-yourself Leak Detector that costs a whole lot less than some of the housing manufacturers charge for the 'genuine article'.
  9. Our May 2009 trip is now full, thanks for everyones interest. We now have 4 spots left on the September 2009 Komodo Islands trip.
  10. The Leak Detector at UWleakdetector.com is totally my own design and sadly doesn't cost US$3 for parts, plus you don't have to make it yourself. The Leak Detector's that I manufacture are each hand made (by me!) and encased in resin for water proofing in the event of a flood. The battery is fully replaceable and seperate from the sensor circuit and sensor strip (both of these features are there so the unit keeps warning of a leak whilst it may be wet). The sensor strip is designed to retain water by its perforated design, which pulls water into itself by 'capillary action'. The electronics is designed with ultra low current draw in detect mode, so that when the unit is just detecting, but not finding moisture or water, the battery lasts for around one year without replacement. The Leak Detector comes completely assembled and ready to fit into your housing, with full instructions and photos of how to fit it within 10 minutes without tools. After a flood the unit can be cleaned and put back into use, in the event of a major flood, where any leak detector would not save the camera. The unit can be returned to me for quick replacement of battery holder and sensor strip for minimal cost and be back in service within a week (depending on where you are in the World). I don't see any of these features in the US$3 model described above! I send Leak Detectors anywhere in the World that Paypal works from. So far this has included USA, Australia, England, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, India, Sri Lanka, Egypt, Switzerland, South Africa, Israel, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan, China, Thailand, Chile, Holland, France, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Canada, Hong Kong, Singapore, Spain, New Zealand & Croatia. I have made Leak Detectors for a wide variety of housings, from the Olympus compact housings, through to everyday Ikelite, 10Bar & Fantasea DSLR housings (which are all stock items, ready for despatch within 24 hours) through to top of the range Hasselblad, Gates and ROV's for oil rig inspections, which are custom made and I may need a couple of photos of the housing/camera to ensure correct fitment. I hope this clarifies what my product is and where it can be sent to, and why it doesn't cost US$3 ........... but guaranteed it will work when you may get an un-noticed leak.
  11. Hi Donna I use an Olympus Zuiko 8mm Fish Eye for all of my wide angle work. The Sigma lens on the Canon will probably be slightly wider than the Olympus lens, but similar technique; First you will need a port suited to the lens, the port you use for the 10-22mm may not be suitable for the 8mm, this will depend on a couple of factors, but check it first underwater to see if it focuses corner to corner sharply at various distances from a subject that fills the frame (at say 1', 2', 3', 4' & 6'). Check also for cropping in the corners from your port/shade. If these tests prove OK, then you don't need another port. As for its actual use underwater: 1) Get close..... then get closer. Only large subjects, up very close will look dramatic in your images. 2) For strobe photography, use diffusers on your strobes - to spread the light as wide as you can, to light the full area in the image. 3) Get your strobes out wide and pull them back from the front of the camera housing - its very easy to get the front of your strobes in the image if you aren't careful, also you don't want the strobes 'just' out of the image corners, you want them well-out of the image. If they are too close to the corners, the left and right hand edges of your image will probably have lots of backscatter, no matter how clear the water is. 4) Aim your strobes slightly outwards to 'paint' an even area of light on the subject, you really want to have one strobe lighting one side of the image, the other strobe lighting the other side of the image - their light output shouldn't overlap in the middle of the image. I hope this helps?
  12. At this point the boat is moving to Ambon and then Raja Ampat from the end of September, so no further Komodo Photo Cruises in 2009 after 13-20th September.
  13. We have chartered a 30metre (100 feet) Phinisi Schooner for a series of underwater photo trips through the famed Komodo Islands in Indonesia during 2008/09. These trips are run & guided by Australian photo-journalist Jeff Mullins and his wife Dawn, who currently live in Bali. These are dive trips for experienced divers with at least a basic understanding of Underwater Photography Principles. Jeff will be offering FREE personal photo help, as well as some round-the table instruction/workshops between dives and in the evenings. We are maximising time at Komodo's peak photographic sites and there will be a maximum of 10 divers/photographers onboard who are then split into two groups. The size of the groups has been limited to offer the best in personal help with photography and to minimise the number of divers on each dive site at one time. The dive itinerary is completely within the Komodo Islands, unlike many trips that leave Bali and spend 2-3 days getting to the Komodo Islands, these trips spend the maximum time at the islands. The second of these trips for 2009 is an 8day / 7night trip from 13th - 20th September. This trip includes: * Depart Bali Sunday 13th September with 10am flight to Flores (approx 1hour 30 minutes flight time). * Arrive Flores 11.30am and transfer direct to live-aboard (15 minutes drive from Airport). * Pack luggage on boat and depart with lunch onboard, with first dive/s the same afternoon. * 7 nights on live-aboard in air-conditioned twin cabin with ensuite, with all diving - three quality dives per day. * Daily photography help, round-table informal photo workshops and image reviewing/editing in evenings. * Three meals a day on live-aboard, including coffee, tea, drinking water. * One afternoon dedicated to searching (with a national park guide) for Komodo Dragons. * Sunday 20th September morning transfer from live-aboard to Flores Airport. * Depart midday Flores to Bali and arrive approx 1.30pm at Domestic Airport on Bali (adjacent to International Airport - if you are transferring direct). Cost of the trip including all of the above is *US$1890 per person twin share (includes flight costs Bali-Flores-Bali). A deposit of US$500 per person is required to secure your position onboard, with balance due August 20th 2009. *Note: The only thing that can vary here is the cost of airfares, as the airlines won't give fixed prices. In 2008 they have had a hike of around 30% due to fuel costs, so with this in mind, this could increase the total cost by up to US$60. Final costings will be provided by 1st August 2009. The above cost does NOT include: * Any rental dive equipment. (Only tanks and weight belts are supplied - let us know prior if you need any equipment). * Komodo National Park Fee's / Harbour fee's (approx US$30 per person, payable on departure from Labuanbajo) * Airport departure taxes in Bali & Flores (approx. US$4 in total) * Excess Baggage on domestic flight (25kgs per person is free). * Alcohol & Soft Drinks. (Soft Drinks, Beer and limited wines/spirits will be available onboard, but are extra). * Transfers to/from airport in Bali. Please visit our webpage for more details / photo galleries / short video ReefWreckandCritter.com/Komodo.htm or contact Jeff or Dawn via e-mail at reefimages@iinet.net.au
  14. We have chartered a 30metre (100 feet) Phinisi Schooner for a series of underwater photo trips through the famed Komodo Islands in Indonesia during 2008/09. These trips are run & guided by Australian photo-journalist Jeff Mullins and his wife Dawn, who currently live in Bali. These are dive trips for experienced divers with at least a basic understanding of Underwater Photography Principles. Jeff will be offering FREE personal photo help, as well as some round-the table instruction/workshops between dives and in the evenings. We are maximising time at Komodo's peak photographic sites and there will be a maximum of 10 divers/photographers onboard who are then split into two groups. The size of the groups has been limited to offer the best in personal help with photography and to minimise the number of divers on each dive site at one time. The dive itinerary is completely within the Komodo Islands, unlike many trips that leave Bali and spend 2-3 days getting to the Komodo Islands, these trips spend the maximum time at the islands. The first of these trips for 2009 is an 8day / 7night trip from 17th - 24th May. This trip includes: * Depart Bali Sunday 17th May with 10am flight to Flores (approx 1hour 30 minutes flight time). * Arrive Flores 11.30am and transfer direct to live-aboard (15 minutes drive from Airport). * Pack luggage on boat and depart with lunch onboard, with first dive/s the same afternoon. * 7 nights on live-aboard in air-conditioned twin cabin with ensuite, with all diving - three quality dives per day. * Daily photography help, round-table informal photo workshops and image reviewing/editing in evenings. * Three meals a day on live-aboard, including coffee, tea, drinking water. * One afternoon dedicated to searching (with a national park guide) for Komodo Dragons. * Sunday 24th May morning transfer from live-aboard to Flores Airport. * Depart midday Flores to Bali and arrive approx 1.30pm at Domestic Airport on Bali (adjacent to International Airport - if you are transferring direct). Cost of the trip including all of the above is *US$1565 per person twin share (includes flight costs Bali-Flores-Bali). A deposit of US$500 per person is required to secure your position onboard, with balance due April 17th 2009. *Note: The only thing that can vary here is the cost of airfares, as the airlines won't give fixed prices. In 2008 they have had a hike of around 30% due to fuel costs, so with this in mind, this could increase the total cost by up to US$60. Final costings will be provided by 10th April 2009. The above cost does NOT include: * Any rental dive equipment. (Only tanks and weight belts are supplied - let us know prior if you need any equipment). * Komodo National Park Fee's / Harbour fee's (approx US$30 per person, payable on departure from Labuanbajo) * Airport departure taxes in Bali & Flores (approx. US$4 in total) * Excess Baggage on domestic flight (25kgs per person is free). * Alcohol & Soft Drinks. (Soft Drinks, Beer and limited wines/spirits will be available onboard, but are extra). * Transfers to/from airport in Bali. Please visit our webpage for more details ReefWreckandCritter.com/Komodo.htm or contact Jeff or Dawn via e-mail at reefimages@iinet.net.au
  15. Thanks for everyones interest in our Komodo Trips. All spots are now filled on the September trip. Contact us if you are interested in a late October trip.
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