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decosnapper

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decosnapper last won the day on June 21 2015

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About decosnapper

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    http://www.simonbrownimages.com
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  1. Fixed that for you... A cursory glance at the topics shows a strong leaning towards a very kit-biased line of what camera to buy and what secondhand kit others wish to sell. Very rarely is there a question about composition, light or anything about the creative side. Which is why I had to ask for a password reset. It had been a very long time... Back to the original thread. I can't offer anything in this case, but I would urge everyone entering competitions to read the terms and conditions carefully, and then check them against the Artists Bill of Rights (http://www.artist-bill-of-rights.com/guides/bill-of-rights-introduction) and perhaps check if the terms offered by the competition is supportive of creators? Is there a rights grab? How can the competition exploit the images? Is a credit for the winners mandatory? Are the judges identified? This list is not exhaustive, but I would encourage anyone entering a competition to check and if there is any doubt to find another more worthy contest.
  2. There are several things one can do:- 1. Refuse to supply image use rights for fees that fail to reflect the cost and risk of creation. 2. Register your works with the US Copyright Office and hand over all infringements to an attorney. 3. Carry on creating and publishing images but use them as PR for another product, goods or service from which you can derive benefit/payment from. Asking photographers and their egos to stand their ground with option 1 is not going to happen any time soon, but I subscribe to this policy. Option 2 derives an irregular but handsome income stream for me in spite of not publishing anything new for nearly two years. Option 3 helps sell all sorts of things; trips, books, courses - whatever. There will be other ways and means. But its not stock, direct sales or Facebook likes of that I'm quietly confident. Besides, the concept and practice of underwater 2D imagery is a bit old hat. Here's the latest from Scapa Flow:- https://skfb.ly/IGBF And yes, some have been licensed. And work quoted for.
  3. For some, this is the new way of making money. If there is any hint that the individual or company responsible can be traced to an address, forget DMCA (a truly dreadful piece of legislation...) and find an attorney/lawyer who will work on contingency. Takedown notices simply reinforce the view its OK to take and then remove if asked...meaning they simply carry on and find another creator's work. It has occurred to me that since around 2010 there has not been a day when I have not been in litigation of some form...such is the new way of making money.
  4. Whenever I see an image I have a natural curiosity to understand its creation and - crucially - the level of manipulation applied to achieve the end result. How many of us share our rushes? All of them? On the back of the camera after the dive? On the editing screen? Not many I guess, because initially* it can feel like taking a s**t in public. And yes, the perfect published world will only reinforce the view that anything that isn't processed/cropped/magic dust/filtered beyond belief is not worthy. And at some point, credibility/belief is lost. But there is nothing really new with that one. So yes, unrealistic expectations with regard to backscatter. Unless you are diving the truly crystal clear waters under waters of the Ross Ice Shelf or in Te Waikoro Pupu Springs in New Zealand**. *initially it did feel like taking a dump when sharing with another photographer. But that emotion passes...and its quite liberating. Highly recommended. **Last time I heard, diving had been banned in Pupu Springs.
  5. Forget agencies. Ring the picture desk and negotiate directly. Higher return...less grief...quicker payment...
  6. Something I have been working on for a while now is underwater 3D photometry. The subject are a pair of WW2 era Valentine Tanks. Used extensively by the allies, these are duplex drive (DD) variants designed for amphibious landings. These examples were lost during Exercise Smash in 1944, a training exercise leading up to D-Day. A further 5 tanks were lost and sadly six of their crew drowned. The models are derived from around 700 individual frames, all shot on one dive:- Firstly, the intact example:- https://sketchfab.com/models/4f755bb9f4d74e98aa34bf40dc1d31fc Secondly, the damaged example:- https://sketchfab.com/models/2f76cf180a8c4dd184515d2fbeeb64bf The tanks are annotated to highlight a few of their features.
  7. Cheers all. Second Valentine Tank is processing right now...and the offshore Coronation wreck site comprising cannon & anchors (not all of it...) is under way... Watch this space!
  8. So it sounds like I'm asking for the moon on a stick. Here's why:- https://sketchfab.com/models/2f76cf180a8c4dd184515d2fbeeb64bf
  9. ...yeah, I know...another "what wide angle works.." thread... So I have a very specific requirement to shoot material with a rectilinear lens. Here's the requirements/fits with list:- As wide as practically possible, but NOT fisheye. NOT zoom in any way or form. FX frame - D700 Min focus 1m minimum. Closer better but not essential. Subal DP FE4 glass - corner to corner sharpness at F5.6 to F8 to "no visible difference to centre of frame". So what fits that list? Real world used it in anger experience most welcome...
  10. Asking if they have a budget is not unreasonable...if they say "sure...it's in the ball park of $xxxx" then you know they are serious. If they say "budget?" then perhaps they might be looking for freebies. Size, or indeed existence of budget needs establishing very early on. You can waste a lot of time figuring out what you charge only to find out they have no money...never intended to have money and were wasting your time. It's the golden rule of the freelance; find out what the budget is and then plan to take all of it. Additional services, extras, you name it you sell it.
  11. From getty: Advertising, worldwide, 500 placements of ONE image of a billboard, sports and leisure for 1 year. That came to just over £6000 So if your sports company wanted to use an age for worldwide advertising for 1 year that's the kind of price Getty would charge. Being paid by the hour might seem like a good idea...but IP is best sold on the right to use.
  12. Do not sell on time. This may (stress may as US law is not my thing) that the images are shot on "work for hire" basis which means you do not own the rights. Do not sell on time. Price up a single image for 1 year worldwide advertising rights on Getty. Then perhaps double the number for exclusive use. Then figure out how many images they might want and multiply. That "might" put you somewhere in the right ballpark to start negotiations. Then check the legal side. Here in the UK we have the diving at work regulations and an advertising commission would fall under this remit. Check lo local laws. Doing it right should keep you and the client out of court. That's my quick thoughts. Best of luck.
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