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TimG

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TimG last won the day on December 12 2015

TimG had the most liked content!

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  • Website URL
    http://www.timsimages.uk
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Depending on the day of the week, either Bamako (Mali), Poynton (UK) or Amsterdam (NL)
  • Interests
    Sunlight reefs, warm seas, good food and fine wine. And Manchester City Football Club.

Additional Info

  • Show Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  • Camera Model & Brand
    Nikon D500, Nikkors 105 and 8-15, Tokina 10-17mm
  • Camera Housing
    Subal ND500
  • Strobe/Lighting Model & Brand
    Inon Z240
  • Accessories
    ULCS

Recent Profile Visitors

77831 profile views
  1. Oh right, thanks. That's what that meant! I didn't realise "LED power" was the aiming light. Doh.
  2. Hey Matt Can you get Brasso in Aus? As I said earlier, I read that works. According to Wikipedia: The label of Australian Brasso lists "Liquid Hydrocarbons 630g/L; Ammonia 5g/L", whereas the material safety data sheet for Brasso in North America lists: isopropyl alcohol 3–5%, ammonia 5–10%, silica powder 15–20% and oxalic acid 0–3% as the ingredients.[4] However, the Australian version contains kaolin instead of silica for abrasives.[5] The online data sheet for Brasso wadding in the UK lists the ingredients as C8-10 Alkane/Cycloalkane/Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Quartz, C14-18 and C16-18 unsaturated Fatty acids, Kaolinite, Aqua, Ammonium Hydroxide and Iron Hydroxide. Brasso liquid lists a slightly different mix; C8-10 Alkane/Cycloalkane/Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Quartz, Kaolin, C12-20 Saturated and Unsaturated Monobasic Fatty Acids, Aqua and Ammonium Hydroxide. Also available are ingredients in a discontinued recipe for Brasso. Wadding: C8-10 Alkane/Cycloalkane/Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Quartz, Ammonium Tallate and Colorant. Liquid: C8-10 Alkane/Cycloalkane/Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Quartz, Kaolin and Ammonium Tallate.[6]
  3. Hey Russell I'm mulling the same thing myself. One thing I couldn't see on the Retra website about the Retra Pros, there must be an aiming light, right? But there's noting about it in the specifications. The image on the website appears to show a "pilot" switch in the centre of the indicator light which changes colour depending on the state of the strobe. Is this the switch for the aiming light?
  4. Just wondering why you want to make the change. Are you looking for extra buoyancy? Or a slicker looking system? I tried going from ULCS with Stix (same arm set up as Oscar) to the Inon Mega Floats - but hated it and sold the Mega Floats. Too much buoyancy and two bulky. For what they cost, the Stix do a great job.
  5. Wow, first time I've heard of using Coke. Interesting! It's the Real Thing, eh? I had the same problem once in Lembeh on a macro port. I tried everything I could get my hands on - other than Coke - but couldn't clean it. I ended up replacing the glass. I think someone on WP a good while ago also suggested the UK metal cleaning liquid, Brasso.
  6. Well it does compared to what I'm used to! I normally shoot TTL for macro. You can't do this with the LSD and I guess I didn't push enough power through the Z240 on the manual strobe settings. I found that I needed to use 1/2 power - even sometimes full power. I did get some great results eventually. But, man, dives and dives of pure frustration! I agree though, a good aiming light is crucial.
  7. Hi sinetwo If you've not done a search on snotting already in WP, it's definitely worth doing so. There's been a lot of discussion (including from me!) on snooting and aiming. Just when you thought u/w photography was tough ... you add shooting.... I use the Retra LSD with an Inon Z240. The Z240 has a button you can press to turn on (and lock-on if you wish) its focussing/aiming light. With the LSD in the correct position the aiming light will indeed point fairly accurately on the subject. Having said that, what took me an age (well, lots of dives and emails to Retra) to learn was the amount of light output absorbed by a snoot. So I was finding that I was aiming the LSD perfectly but the resulting image was black. I believed that the problem was the LSD aim. But it wasn't. It was that the image was dramatically underexposed because of the amount of light absorption by the LSD. I'm not sure of the exact amount but, say 3-4 stops. You may know this already - but it surprised me. I just thought the aim of the LSD was rubbish!
  8. The reason for asking about the camera and what device you are using to initiate the Anglerfish, was to see if perhaps the Anglerfish was not receiving what it requires to initiate and fire the strobe connected to it. Getting the Anglerfish to switch on (and off) is certainly a party trick - especially underwater. But once you are certain it is on, then the problem is likely to be either the cable between the Anglerfish and the remote strobe ; or a problem with what initiates the Anglerfish to fire, ie, your camera and its strobe. To switch on, are you getting lights in the order: impact - purple - impact - 2x Blue - 2x impact - purple?
  9. What camera and optical trigger are you using, Nir?
  10. Matt You and Adam are not alone. Count me in too. I thought long and hard about moving from my D800 to the D850 but, after much thought - and arguments put forward by Adam, I went with the D500. Housing WA was the big decider for me. I liked the Nikkor 16-35 lens but lugging the 230 domeport and the 90mm EXR etc etc was just a pain. I'm very happy with the D500. All round less expensive, excellent macro (with the Nikkor 105), terrific WA with the Nikkor 8-15. And, if I'm truthful, I'd struggle to see any major IQ difference between that and FF. And the three of us are not alone either. There are other WPers who have gone that route - rather than FF.
  11. Brilliant! Really glad it worked well.
  12. Karyll, someone was advertising an LSD for sale here a few weeks back. Worth a search if you havn't already.
  13. I'm sure the IATA regulations do apply to all carriers. The issue I've always found is the management of regulations. I wouldn't bank on most of the people we have contact with in the airline/travel world having much more than hazy understanding of them. Liz (errbrr) makes good point about carrying a copy with you. Even then, there are lots of countries where I would not want to pull my copy of the regulations out of my pocket and say, "look here my good man/woman, IATA says....". You can almost hear the snap of the rubber glove.
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