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red3

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Posts posted by red3


  1. After Spending 40+ days with Eric, Cor and Julie I thought I needed to say thank you to everyone who made this such a great trip. Its hard to figure out where to begin.

     

    I have no background in macro photography and only a loose handle on wide. I have real trouble seeing anything smaller than 4 feet long with lots of teeth and to say the least, I was out of my element. Cor and Julie are fantastic photographers and unbelievable spotters of all things small. Their patience with me when pointing out things and dealing with me stirring up the bottom (they called me desert storm) should result in their nominations for Sainthood. Thanks for all your help and kind words...

     

    Thank you to Frank for being a great roommate, willing to sacrifice three dives so I could get the perfect frogfish shot and for just being you.........

     

    Thanks to Graham Abbott for being the hardest working guide in Indonesia. I cant say enough about how impressed I was with him. Everyday he was up early checking out the dive sites finding critters or habitats, checking currents and water clarity. He was always concerned with trying to find the best sites he could. When it comes to finding critters he is a freak of nature. That man can see things that I could not see until it was up on my computer screen! I think he got a certain amount of pleasure in finding things too small for me to shoot. I'm not saying that he wasted anyone's time, I'm saying that he is that good. Graham has a great sense of humor and was a great sport. Any trips that I take to Indo will definately have him as a guide and to anyone going there I think your doing yourself a disservice by not having him on the trip.

     

    Thanks to the crew of the Seven Seas. They were awesome. Great with the camera gear and I was amazed at how fast they learned who's gear belonged to whom. I was a constant source of broken gear yet the crew was always able to keep me going...

     

    Big thanks to Matt Segal for being our parts mule....

     

    The biggest thanks goes to our fearless leader Eric Cheng. Spending 40+ days on a boat with someone as incompetent as me is enough to send most people over the edge. But what most people don't know is that we were roomies for two months before this trip when we were in Antarctica! He put together an awesome group of people on a great boat. There are so many things that I need to thank him for about this trip that most people will never know about...Thanks man


  2. I had to make a claim with H20 Ins earlier this year. I just faxed them a stack of retail printouts that I pulled off the internet and a few pictures of the loss....Of course the pictures I sent them showed my camera swimming away in a large tiger sharks mouth, never to be seen again.......Once they realized that I wasen't joking about how the camera was lost they sent me a check right away.....My hats off to H20 Insurance


  3. Alex,

     

    Try this: Go to C. Fn IV.....switch C. Fn IV #1 from 0 to #2 which reads "metering star/meter + AF Start" then hit the set button..... then go to C. Fn IV #2 and switch the "AF-ON/AE lock button Switch" from disable to Enable and push the set button....I have been using mine like this for a few months and I think thats all that is required to use the * button W/O the shutter re-focusing.... if it dosent work let me know and i'll keep looking in my menu....

     

     

    Hello !

     

    i've just traded my old 1dII (housing and cam still for sale btw) for a 1dsmk3 in a seacam housing.

    I really love this new cam on land, and i'm flying to the indian ocean in a few days to try the underwater setup

     

    i have been used to * focus and then use the shutter just to take the photo, but on the mk3 camera,

     

    When I set it to use the * button for focus, the focus function on shutter isn't deactivated, and the camera will sometimes re-focus when I recompose and press the shutter. THis might be very annoying for manual focusing.

     

    i am sure i have set up something wrong ^_^

    what are your C FN settings for this ?

     

    Thanks

    Alex


  4. "His hope now is that more people will apply for permits to catch sharks to thin out the herds."

     

    This is the kind of thinking that has continued the demise of shark populations. We see a small area where sharks may be recovering slightly and our wonderful shrimpers seek to wipe them out again. This is the face of extensive reports about the collapse in Atlantic Shark Populations.

     

    _________________________________________________

     

    Three shark bites have been reported in the past three weeks in Lowcountry waters and shrimpers say they've seen an increase in the number of sharks in the water.

     

    But do you need to be worried? News two's Tara Lynn spent the day with a shrimper to find out.

     

    Most Lowcountry shrimpers start the day patching their nets, Closing holes that sharks ripped open trying to eat fish caught in the nets.

     

    McClellanville shrimpers Willy Thomas and Darrell Cumbee say they're sewing up more than ever before.

     

    http://www.wcbd.com/midatlantic/cbd/news.a...07-16-0024.html

     

     

    Gee imagine that!!!! Some of the most destructive fishermen on the planet (shrimpers) wanting some of the most endangered animals on the planet (sharks) culled for shrimp cocktail...Are the sharks following the shrimp boats because of the obscene volume of bycatch that the shrimpers are dumping in the water!!!? Or are the sharks going after the bycatch in the nets? I cant think of too many shark spieces, on the east coast, that target shrimp as thier primary food source. If the sharks are targeting the shrimp in the nets then why would they do so? Have the shrimpers scrubbed the seas so clean that the sharks have had to change thier feeding behavior?

     

    A while back I was talking to Eric about the fact that the only seafood I enjoyed was shrimp and told him (quite proudly) that I only ate "farmed" shrimp because wild shrimp was caught in such a destructive manner. Well, Eric was kind enough to enlighten this knuckle-dragger (me) of the destructive nature of shrimp farming as well. I haven't had a shrimp since.... Thank you Eric for enlightening a neanderthal...


  5. About four years ago I had the same problem.... I was going through a sync cord every 1.3 days of diving... A 1 week trip was a 6 sync cord deal for me...I contacted Ike and they said (at the time) that they had never heard of any complaints about where the sync cord was placed. So I fixed it myself...I switched to sea and sea....


  6. older ds125 for sale ....S/N 3967

     

    Just serviced at IKE and has Latest digital updates

    has not been in water since serviceing comes with new smart charger and new NiMH battery pack.....$475.00

     

    Also have 1 new additional NiMH battery pack..........$60.00

     

    2 Ike EV controllers for sale...........$50.00 ea


  7. Dan, to asnwer your questions, I am shooting RAW and unfortunately the conditions underwater do change that much on a moment by moment basis somtimes. For example when your shooting manta rays you may have your camera set up at say f8, 100/sec with your strobes at half or even 1/4 power as he's swimming by you....Suddenly he hooks a wing, turns left and is going to swim two feet over your head while being back lit by the sun...Now I need to make some quick changes to my system...F16-20, 200/sec and full power on the strobes to counter the back-lighting and the aperture change. All of these things are nearly impossible with the way that housings are currently produced. If you asked the guys that have shot really good pics like this you'll find that they set the camera up for these conditions and waited for this to happen...Opportunities like this may take several dives or even several trips to occurre....If TTL actually worked then at least I wouldnt have to monkey with strobes so much.... I'm not saying that wedding photography is easy, on the contrary every wedding photographer I know calls it combat phtography. But as we all know u/w photography is a whole different animal...not only are the conditions changing like a poorly lit disco but your buried in a totally hostile environment...Underwater....

    As for the strobe that has the pigtail I dont want to get into brand bashing....As a new u/w photo guy I hope that this topic helps you make a more informed descision when you buy... Look at housings and strobes from the standpoint of using them not just because they look cool or hi-tech....when you hold a housing are the shutter speed and aperture knobs easily acsessable with your thumb and fingers without taking your hand of the handle?. Can you see into the viewfinder easily with a regulator in your mouth? Is something sticking out of the back of the housing going to depress the purge valve on the regulator and blind you with bubbles as that 16ft tiger shark approaches you face to face? can you adjust the strobes wth gloved hands (i have no faith in TTL for wide angle)? These are just a few of the most blatent and aggravating short comings that I feel are totally inexcusable in housing/ strobe design.

     

    Dave...I am glad that over the years that you have been able to make modifications to your housings to make them more user friendly. However, this post was not to try and start a new industry such as custom housing modification... the idea was to get the manufacturers to make the products right in the first place...A custom modification should be for people missing fingers or a spare bulkhead for a remote shutter(although I think housings should already come wth this), things that are out of the norm...As you know Im not afraid to modify a housing...I have adapted several housings to work for later generation cameras... I have a small machine shop in my garage and the ability to use it... I can easily move the knobs that are so offensive to me on my housing but the housing has been machined too thin, by the manufacturer, to safely accept an O-ring and a shaft for the knobs to attatch to.

     

    I know that this a small cottage industry. Thats why the morons at Canon and Nikon are getting away with using these idiotically small viewfinders. They dont care about the professional photographer or even the serious hobbyist. We are too small a market for them to be concerned with... the money is with the masses and they seem to think that smaller is better... When the new live-view becomes more usable the whole viewfinder thing is going to be moot anyway.. I feel bad for the guys that have shelled out the $1000-$2000 for those wazoo viewfinders... It is because this is a small cottage industry that I find this so inexcusable....We're not dealing with Ford or GM (remember the Pinto?). We SHOULD have access to the guys at the factories and the machine shop floor... They should be making the changes almost instantly as the market (customer) demands...Thats the problem, we are not demanding that this stuff be made right (Does the phrase"thank you sir! May I have another!? mean anything to us). We keep buying these abortions that they are producing and saying how wonderful they are. Market demands who survives and who dosent. Why should we be grateful for a barely usable piece of crap? Dont let the manufacurers tell you how difficult it is to make these things either. Dome technology aside, making a housing is a very simple process that can be handled by any parolee that has been to a prison machinist class...People talk about big CNC macines and all the technology that is needed to make these things, but the reality is that the only thing that you really need a CNC machine to do is cut the O-ring groove in the back of the housing. The rest can be easily handled on the most basic manual milling machine...The reason they use CNC machines is because it is more cost effective when making multiple copies of a given product. Solving the shutter/aperture problem on most of these housings is a simple matter of changing the X/Y coordinates of those knobs and making the discs that contact the camera body larger. It would take the CNC prgrammer about a minute to make these changes but somebody needs to tell him to do so!!!!!!! Clearly the machinist dosent use his own product. If he did he would be embarrassed by the product and make the changes that were needed.

     

    I cant think of another industry that has survived, over time, that requires the customer to adapt to thier products. They should be adapting to our needs and demands not the other way around!!! It's just a semi- waterproof box, and it's not going to the moon!!!

     

    I'll take my soap box and go home now. I feel better. I hope that I have not offended anyone exept the manufacturers who should be ashamed of what they force us to use....


  8. I just have to say a few things that I hope might make it to the powers that be at DEMA in regards to housing design for Canon cameras as well as strobe design. First let me qualify myself by saying that I have no photography pedigree and in fact calling myself a hack is giving myself too much credit. However, I do use a housing occasionally and I have found some things lacking mostly related to egonomics or user-friendliness on housings for Canon cameras.

     

    I was dumb enough to switch to Canon from Nikon and I now shoot a 5D. I say dumb because I did not realize that most housing manufacturers seem to have a grudge against the controls on canon bodies. I am now on my third species of housing. I was wondering if anyone who manufactures housings actually uses them? Do they realize that on occasion, underwater photography can be more than a static event, that fish do move and that you may have to make an aperture and /or shutter adjustment on the fly? I say this because the control knobs for shutter and aperture on my housing, and almost all others for Canon cameras,are placed in locations that make absolutely no sense and are all but useless to use for anything but macro. Both knobs require that I remove my hand from the right handle and shutter lever to make any adjustments at all. To adjust the Quick control dial I have to move the housing away from my face, take my hand from the right handle (where the shutter lever is) make the random adjustment (since I cant look through the view finder), place the camera back up to my face, re-compose the shot, hope that the adjustment was correct and that the subject was patient enough for me to un-f*** myself and take the picture. All of this because the designers put the knobs in the wrong place. Now I'm not saying that all the manufacturers have made this same mistake. I have seen one housing manufacturer actually put a little thought in to user-friendliness. The only drawback is that the correctly made housing would cost more than the three housings that I have used, combined. That seems a liitle extreme for a couple of knobs that are in the right place.

     

    Why are we still using the weak, pathetic and anemic Nikonos connector on sync cords? How about switching to S6 conectors or, even better, fiber optic sync cords? I know that your saying" but it wont work with TTL". Yeah, well, TTL seems to be a fairly random event unless your shooting macro so why worry about it. At least with fiber optics you could repair them in the field when they break and they dont flood. But then again the guys that make the sync cords would lose alot of business if the cords worked all the time. On my first housing I was breaking sync cords every 1.3 days of diving because of where they put it on the housing. My regulator would kink the cord every time I composed a shot and the wires inside would break. when I talked to the manufacturer about it they said that they had never heard about anyone having this problem but they were working on a fix for it. Well the fix that they came up with could only be described as kludgee at best. Why not put the cord in the right place to begin with?

    Strobes. Why would anyone put the knobs on the side of the strobe? When I have to make a quick power adjustment I have to turn the housing sideways so I can see the knobs on the side of the strobe. The knobs are so tight at depth that I have to hold the strobe in one hand and adjust power with the other or I'll move the arm assembly all over the place. I recently saw a new strobe with lots of power, a pretty good recycle time and the knobs on the back. Sounded too good to be true and it was. The battery compartment cap is huge and makes getting to the control knobs difficult if not impossible with thick gloved hands. Open the battery compartment and you see a battery with a pig-tail connector that is bent 180 degrees and I gaurantee it will fail when your 12000 miles from home. The cap has a cut-out that fits around the pig-tail so you can screw the manhole size cover on the battery compartment. Guess what happens if you dont align the cut out with the pig-tail? The battery compartment cap will cross thread and WILL allow the strobe to FLOOD. I guess thats ok since your gonna need lots of spares anyway with the pig-tail breaking all the time. How about a battery that plugs in when it you put it into the compartment? You guys delayed the release of the strobe for months and this is what you came up with? good job guys.....

     

    I could go on and on about the various short comings on different housings...none of them are perfect but most are not even close. A housing is nothing but a, somtimes water proof, box. It allows access to most of the important controls. Is it really so hard to put the controls where a diver, not some engineer, wants them? How about letting real divers test them before you go into production? If you do let people test the proto-type how about actually listening to their comments? It seems that everyone is more concerned about releasing thier housing first rather than right. The few flaws that I have mentioned here are not small nit picking complaints. These are problems that I as well as many others have brought up over time and most of them are blatent enough that stevie wonder could see them.....

     

    thanks

     

    One very frustrated U/W photo-butcher


  9. I am looking for advice on how I can use a Seacam wet diopter on an Aquatica port. This lens has an external o-ring that securely pops into a groove machined into the outside internal lip of the macro port. The Seacam port diam is 10.4cm and the Aquatica port is 12.4cm internal diam. I need to be able to take this on and off the port under water. This is a great lens which converts 1:1 to 1.7:1. It is only 1.4 cm thick so it can easily slip into a pocket, and is much more compact than the only other wet diopter I can find (the Macromate also costs $200 more than the $300 Seacam lens). So if you have any great ideas please let me know.

     

    Thanks

     

     

    I have made several adapters for various people along the lines of what you need. I made an adapter for the Inon diopters to fit my aquatica port and it sound svery similar.....PM me if you are interested and /or still need this ...


  10. Hey guys, I screwed up and tried to enter pics that were too big, I think. Can you delete my current two "gator" entries....I have resized pics and would like to submit them plz.....

     

    Sorry for any inconvenience....

    Don Kehoe


  11. If I mounted a normal screw-on type diopter to the outside of my macro port would it still work? I have the ability to make a ring assembly to hold a diopter to my port but I dont know if I'd be wasting my time. I have an aquatica housing and thought that maybe using a set of, say, 77mm diopters would be fun to play with if I could mount them in a "wet" fasion. Is there something special about the lenses that backscatter and woodys uses for thier wet diopters that lets them work on the outside of the port? (other than the way it is mounted)


  12. Can somone explain the benifits of a FF sensor over a cropped sensor? I have a D70 and am thinking of switching to canon because of faster focus. trying to decide on 20d or 5d. I like the bonus magnification that you get with the cropped sensor for macro and tele surface pics but the extra pixels of the 5d are very attractive.


  13. I am a hack photog but I have both the 12-24mm and the 10.5mm on a d70. My experience has lead me to the conclusion that we need to be able to change lenses under water... :P

     

    I shoot big animals mostly and have found that the 10.5 is a far superior lens to 12-24. I think what is important is that you really have to have the correct lens for the task at hand...there is no phenominal lens that does it all...I thought there was and that is why I bought the 12-24...However once I tried the 10.5 I never put the 12-24 back on the camera. The 10.5 forces you to get closer which gets less water between you and your subject and that will always result in a better picture....I rented a 14mm lens once and tried it in the bahamas this summer....all I can say is wow!!!!...anyone want to buy a low milage 12-24mm?...I gotta have that 14mm...

     

    If I had to do it over again I would save my pennies and buy the 14mm first and then the 10.5.....the quality of the images from the 12-24 just isn't there for me...

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