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Trwen

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About Trwen

  • Rank
    Damselfish

Additional Info

  • Show Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  • Camera Model & Brand
    Canon S120
  • Camera Housing
    Canon WP DC51
  • Strobe/Lighting Model & Brand
    Inon S1200
  • Accessories
    Fantasea Nano LED focus light; Inon 5" ultralight arms x 2
  1. Hi All Thanks for your replies. OK, so practice with shutter speeds (and apertures) is clearly the way forward. Not sure where you're regularly diving, but let's put it in context - I'm diving in the UK where it's essential to use brightest light to even see critters!! - given the 0.5 - 1m vis we're getting this past year due to weather impacts, and probably to continue this summer season as well.... Once I've located something using brightest beam, either red or white, I can then switch to lowest brightness, and make sure the beam covers everything I need. This is possibly slightly more difficult with Canon S120 with aperture range from f1.8 - 8 only....at least it does have f1.8...... Do you know if this range of apertures corresponds with dSLR? ie is f8 on compact the same aperture as f8 on dSLR? or is it equalised within the whole range to represent the much larger ranges on a dSLR?
  2. Hi folk, I feel embarrassed at having to ask this, but I have just switched from a fantasea nano focus light - which turns off at crucial moment of strobes flash - to Sola photo 800 - which does not. Not had time or opportunity to use and see how it works.... I bought it so I could: *use it with red light at night etc, and not to frighten creatures, and *to use as general dive light. *But ALSO, and most importantly, to use as a focus light; still photos not video. I am mounting it with YS mount on top of camera housing (Canon compact S120 and housing; 2xInon s2000 strobes) So - Q1 if it stays on when the strobes flash, does it not completely overexpose? Is it just a question of trial and error? Q2 Is it preferable (for the above reason) to use it on just red for photos? and keep the white for a general dive light Q3 If so, does it significantly change the colour cast of the photo? All and any help/advice very welcome Thanks
  3. Round coast of Wales this year the viz has been pretty dire, eg av 2m most of the time. Focus light definitely necessary esp close focus WA. Do hope next year the waters have cleared a bit!
  4. Thanks Sea Nettle, but I don't have an 'on' button. The Fantasea Nano focus light is turned on by turning the head of the torch anticlockwise! In fact the torch does seem to turn off when strobes flash, and I have learned to set the shutter for 'rear curtain', but is it possible that it is not syncing properly with the strobes? I have to say I rather think now that it must be inexperienced photographer error with focus, exposure, and strobe position.....
  5. Hi I have a canon S120 compact with Inon WA Wet lens, and 2x Inon S2000 strobes, with Fantasea Nano focus light. I do not use a dome port (can't quite run to it at the moment...but happy to know if that addition will in fact substantially improve photo quality) [i also have Inon Macro wet lens - which I'm having to learn to change with WA lens, with some degree of dexterity underwater, plus with 5mm gloves..but that is a 'by the way'] To do a close focus WA shot of small subject (e.g.nudibranch) at say approx 12" distance, in mucky water where sediment in the water reduces vis to 2m with concomitant high problem of backscatter, and to get good background, would I zoom in manually using the lever on the housing? Or should I just be thinking Macro wet lens and forget the WA and background?? Nor do I quite understand the difference between manual and digital zoom.....all and any help appreciated? many thanx
  6. Hi I have a problem in that my Fantasea Nano focus light doesn't seem to be syncing correctly with the Inon S2000 strobe. Today, using just the one strobe, in pretty poor vis with lots of silt, using close focus wide angle, i kept getting a hot spot from the focus light. I've attached an example. I placed my strobe vertically about a foot above the camera facing straight forward, used Manual mode, and the Nano was attached on the cold boot attachment on top of the Inon converter for WA wet lens, and was focused immediately down in front. As you can see it has lit up the shot with a very definite hotspot. I did visually check on the dive to make sure it was actually turning off and it seemed to, but clearly either it didn't 'see' the strobe for some reason, or it's turning off too late. Maybe I need a 'better' focus light, or maybe I'm positioning everything wrongly....the strobe power was clearly a bit low for the conditions too, but it was working....and even if too low, the photo could be photoshopped to expose better and bring out highlights more...it's the bright light I'm concerned about. I'd welcome any advice!
  7. I have a Canon S120 with Canon WP DC51 housing. I just bought the WA lens with hood from Inon, plus mountbase and all the fixings. Trial photo underwater in a large farm water tank, and to my disappointment I have the lens/lenshood showing in the corners of the frame; so that to get a 'clean' photo I would need to crop always. Is this user error in some way, or a fault in the design of the Inon WA lens with hood set up? I'm loath at the moment to submerge myself if I then have to send anything back to INON.... All and any suggestions/advice welcome
  8. Samplin Thanks for that...I have eliminated the focus light as an issue yesterday, so now I know it must be my strobe strength or position! Unfortunately yesterday I was not diving with people who wanted to hang around while I played with different settings (non-photographers), so I had to grab what I could; I left the settings the same and merely changed angle and position of strobe. Slightly better on some, so now I need to power down on the strobe. I see others have suggested different settings and will reply to them too.
  9. Timthefish Yes, I have done a lot of playing about in a darkened room at home. Yesterday I tried again at both 30m and 8m and I think you're right that I have the strobe on too high as even at 30m I got some white outs.....I did try turning it down, but then the review photo looked too dark. If I have to have an error, which is best, over or under exposed?
  10. Timthefish OK, I did check that the focus light went out and it did - I had that problem before and it was due to my focus light not 'seeing' the strobe either due to low batteries in focus light, or angle of strobe to focus light. That seems to be working now. I think what I'll do is alter strobe power for the moment.... We weren't very deep (12m) and ambient light meant I could easily see things without a light...so inference is I had the strobe on too high power. Tomorrow will tell. Thanks
  11. Yes, first things first...I'll try next with my focus light out and see if it replicates problems, in similar conditions. I take your point about the strobe focus being too far above and therefore being too bright for the background. Can't afford 2 strobes and a lot of my fellow divers seem to only use one, so will have to keep trying for the moment. OK, I see what 45 degrees angle is meant. Thanks very much
  12. My set up is: Canon S120, Canon housing, single Inon 1200S strobe mounted on 2 x 5" arms, Fantasea Nano focus LED mounted on cold-shoe top of housing. Issues are: diving in fairly murky water (meaning a lot of floating plankton and debris) and this year, due to violent storms in spring, vis around 3-5m max. Current settings on camera are Manual, Auto focus on, ISO 100, f6.3, shutter speed 1/500, point AE focus, minimum flash power. On strobe the setting is Manual, with magnet in, and flash strength 5.5 Exposure problems - the top third of a lot of photos is over exposed. I've read loads (feeling quite confused) about single strobe positions for macro pix and understood that the closer the subject, the closer the strobe to the camera - this makes sense. However, this does seem to produce a hotspot or flare (not sure which). I've attached a typical photo with above problems I am also having problems with backscatter - due I'm sure to positioning of strobe. I have heard that you set your camera settings before you go in and alter exposure for different shots with the strobe strength..is this the best place from which to start? I tend habitually to take macro shots from around 3-6" away, most often on short animal turf on rock/boulder, aim the focus light directly at subject and use my focus light with shutter halfway pressed down to focus the camera lens ...and from there on I'm lost about how/where to focus the strobe (which doesn't have an aiming light). Can anyone draw a diagram for me from which strobe position and distance from camera to start, given all the above criteria? When sites mention angles of 45degrees, they fail to mention 45degrees from what. I know I'm probably asking too much but some help would be greatly appreciated!
  13. My set up is: Canon S120, Canon housing, single Inon 1200S strobe mounted on 2 x 5" arms, Fantasea Nano focus LED mounted on cold-shoe top of housing. Issues are: diving in fairly murky water (meaning a lot of floating plankton and debris) and this year, due to violent storms in spring, vis around 3-5m max. Current settings on camera are Manual, Auto focus on, ISO 100, f6.3, shutter speed 1/500, point AE focus, minimum flash power. On strobe the setting is Manual, with magnet in, and flash strength 5.5 Exposure problems - the top third of a lot of photos is over exposed. I've read loads (feeling quite confused) about single strobe positions for macro pix and understood that the closer the subject, the closer the strobe to the camera - this makes sense. However, this does seem to produce a hotspot or flare (not sure which). I've attached a typical photo with above problems I am also having problems with backscatter - due I'm sure to positioning of strobe. I have heard that you set your camera settings before you go in and alter exposure for different shots with the strobe strength..is this the best place from which to start? I tend habitually to take macro shots from around 3-6" away, most often on short animal turf on rock/boulder, aim the focus light directly at subject and use my focus light with shutter halfway pressed down to focus the camera lens ...and from there on I'm lost about how/where to focus the strobe (which doesn't have an aiming light). Can anyone draw a diagram for me from which strobe position and distance from camera to start, given all the above criteria? When sites mention angles of 45degrees, they fail to mention 45degrees from what. I know I'm probably asking too much but some help would be greatly appreciated!
  14. In manual, don't you need your flash up, so the strobe can detect it and work from it?
  15. Hi all. Look forward to learning something about underwater photography....being a beginner. I live in North Wales, where the photographic conditions leave a lot to be desired this year (2 metres on a good day, due to storm lifted sediment). Am a keen Seasearcher, upgrading to Surveyor this summer (if we can get into the water and see anything).....Have used a Canon Ixus 95 very successfully up to now with inbuilt flash...just moved on to CanonS120 and single Inon S2000 strobe with 2x 5" inon ultralight arms - less than successfully!! Having problems with handling and buoyancy of set up. Will be posting somewhere about this. Using a Fantasea Nano LED focus light on cold shoe mount. Problems with this too...possibly faulty sensor. Oh well....it's a big learning curve....
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