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Fofo

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Fofo last won the day on April 6 2017

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About Fofo

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  1. I don't know Ikelite's, but if the battery compartment is sealed (that is, if this flooding didn't affect the internal components in the main body of the strobe) like in Sea & Sea strobes, I have in the past just cleaned up the inside of the strobe with rags made from old t-shirts and long, thin, sturdy pieces of wood (bamboo skewers, specifically) and a little bit of water. With some patience you can make the inside look almost as if nothing happened. In the Sea & Sea strobes, I disassemble the strobe cap to clean it after a flood since it has an intricate design (and I clean it the same way, with a rag, a little bit of water, a bamboo skewer and some patience), but as long as it's well rinsed and dried, some may consider this not necessary.
  2. You can go for a long time with it. You can keep a spare with you for peace of mind, but it can easily go for a year with it.
  3. Interesting question, because it is an expensive piece of kit. Some people think that the reassurance that you get is worth the price, others (many of them very accomplished underwater photographers) think that it's not worth it as long as you are careful and methodical with your gear preparation. I have one, and I like it, but I didn't have one in my previous housing and I was really careful with it and never had a problem. Would I buy it if I had to do it again? Probably yes, maybe not initially (paying for all the accessories for the housing leaves a big hole in the wallet!) but maybe later. About the size, look at where it will be installed in your housing and it should say if it's M14 or M16.
  4. I had the Nauticam trigger assembly on my housing (similar to the one in the link that @Barmaglot posted). In cold water it feels like it really helps, you can stabilize the tray and housing assembly by using the handles, and use the index finger to shoot. Last week, though, my trigger broke in the middle of a warm water diving vacation. I removed it and I actually enjoyed having my hand directly on the housing, since I could access buttons faster, and when holding it with the single right hand it felt more stable, since my hand was closer to the center of mass and there was less momentum/lever. I don't have a repaired trigger back, so I'll see how shooting like this feels in cold water, using dry gloves and insulation. Last week I really liked it, and I can see myself removing the trigger in the future for warm water diving.
  5. Hey Larry. Sorry to hear that you have a small leak. Yeah, the o-ring is the typical nitrile butadiene type, silicone lube will be OK. But it sounds like you have a small leak. Hopefully replacing the o-ring will stop it. My vacuum cap doesn't leak at all. And to help with the valve sticking, maybe removing it from the housing and giving it a good rinse in fresh water could help? Good luck!
  6. I had this happen to mine in the middle of a diving trip. It turned out to be, strangely, that the water sensor inside the housing (the two metal tips) had been pushed further back in their cable holder. I put them back to the original spot and the alarm went away. I hope that it's something as simple as this in yours!
  7. I agree. I got two YS-01s, and they are OK, but now it's more of a challenge to upgrade both of them, so in your case I would go with a single YS-D2 for now, and when the time comes, get a second one.
  8. I have one in my new housing, I've been using it for about a year now. I'm very careful in my preparation and maintenance, and so far, after about ten years of using cameras I haven't flooded one or a strobe. The vacuum system does add a layer of peace of mind, but I find it sometimes as an annoyance, one more thing to do before and after diving. I kinda like having it, but I didn't feel like I needed one before I got this one. So for me I could go either way. I have it, so I use it, but I wouldn't miss it too much if it were gone.
  9. I had the very same issue happen to my Nauticam housing during a trip. The vacuum system would create a vacuum and the housing would hold the vacuum. But the moisture sensor alarm would go off even when the housing was open and I could see that the sensor wires were dry. What solved it was to push a little bit further out the sensor wires. For some reason in my housing if the sensor wires are pushed in further into the housing the alarm goes off, even though I couldn't tell that there was anything closing the circuit (no water or loose conductive metal). Pushing the detector wires a little bit further out on their holder stopped the alarm. But if I touched with with a moist finger the alarm would still go off. Since the vacuum system was showing that the vacuum was holding that was good enough for me and I was able to finish my diving vacation normally.
  10. Great news chrisdarke! Happy diving.
  11. Sorry to hear about this. I've never had a problem screwing the standard attachments to Aquatica housings, but I did need to re-tap one hole after it got damaged by galvanic corrosion. It's pretty hard to tell from this picture, but on the farthest hole, which at least to me seems to be the clearest of the three on the picture, it kind of looks like there's some buildup in the threads, but it also almost looks like the outermost thread is cross-threaded. If it's buildup you could carefully fill the hole with vinegar, let it sit for a bit and then soak it up with a napkin and use a hard plastic tip to carefully clean the threads. If it's cross-threaded it can be fixed at home but there's a high risk of damaging the housing further so it would be a good idea to have it checked by whoever services housings in your area.
  12. Well, you got a taste of what a foreigner goes through when visiting the United States.
  13. Or if your Nauticam housing allows (it probably does, since I can do it in mine, although it's a different camera model), after cutting the end of the cable square with a very sharp blade you could insert it directly into the fiber optic cable holder. My Nauticam housing has two large connectors for the ends of these cables, but in between those has two small holes that accept cables without connectors. You may need to push a little bit, but this is good, it holds it in place. Good luck!
  14. Hi Cerianthus. I agree. Including the swirl effect would make the subject even larger. I was confused by this as well.
  15. Hi! I do have a request for clarification on the official rules for macro for this competition. First of all, I don't know either of you, and I don't want to feel like I'm taking any sides or anything. I am strictly wanting to clarify the rules. Per the website, macro is defined as "Any image captured with a macro lens, where the size of the subject on the image sensor is life size or greater." To simplify the discussion let's assume a full frame sensor (36 mm x 24 mm). This means that our subject would need to be 36 mm wide and fill out the full sensor to be 1:1. If we shoot something that's 50 mm wide and we fill the sensor with it then we would be "shrinking to fit" the subject and it would not be macro according to the guidelines. If we shoot something that's 20 mm wide and we fill the sensor then we would be magnifying it and it would be OK per the guidelines. My question is because I was looking at the rules, and since I am using a cropped sensor, a majority of my nudibranch shots would not qualify as macro shots per these rules. I would need to select only shots of nudibranchs about 17 mm long (the width or my sensor) or smaller. Again, I am just searching for clarification. Thank you!
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