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Laval

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Laval last won the day on December 7 2019

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About Laval

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    Moray Eel

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Toronto
  • Interests
    UW videography: macro and wide angle

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    Canada
  • Camera Model & Brand
    Sony A7Rii
  • Camera Housing
    Ikelite
  • Strobe/Lighting Model & Brand
    Fix Neo 3000

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  1. Further to my previous two posts on this topic, PART 1 and PART 2, I practiced with grading of my HLG footage in FCPX a little bit more. So far, I found that the best way to grade HLG footage for SDR TVs and screens is to grade them on Rec.709 Timeline using the following LUTs: Lemming Camera LUT 'Pro Sony A - HLG to Rec.709 and Custom LUT 'Quicker - Neutral Film Brightest'. After applying LUTs, I graded clips as usual. It does not take more time and does not require a special monitor. There are probably other and better ways to grade HLG footage, but I do not know them yet. Here is the link to the video Shooting HLG Underwater-Grading on Rec 709 Timeline You could see depth, ISO and F values of each clip in captions. Another version of this video, graded in Premier Pro, was kindly put together by Juan M.Núñez It would be interesting to know your opinion about the quality of images on SDR screens. Also, if anyone would like to play with raw HLG clips that Juan and I used in these two videos, please let me know and I will share a link to the Dropbox.
  2. I watched your video on my HDR TV, and, in my humble opinion, it shows good potential of using HLG underwater. I appreciate that you do not have proper lights, but when there was sufficient light, I could see very rich, good colors.
  3. Thank you, Lionfi2s. I appreciate your feedback and recommendations. I will definitely try them.
  4. Thank you for watching my videos and your valuable feedback. I will try your recommendation "use the PQ but apply some small improvements than go back to HLG deleting the HDR tools adjustments".
  5. Inspired by discussion triggered by my PREVIOUS POST on this topic, and after watching an interview with Alister Chapman, I experimented with HLG footage a bit more (without a special HDR Monitor). This time, rather than converting HLG clips to Rec.709 clips, I created a new video in true HLG format, to see how it would work for both HDR and SDR TVs. I actually ended up creating two versions of the same video. Both versions were created with the same Video Codec: ‘HDR TV’ version – in this version I wanted to see what would be the quality of the video without any color grading (okay, almost no color grading) ‘SDR TV’ version – in this version I did some minimal color grading to get an image quality on an SDR screen similar to the one an HDR screen (in my subjective opinion). I selected several video clips that I shot in HLG (BT2020 color space) at different depths (from 5 m to 35 m) and did the following (mostly following Apple’s recommendations): 1. Created a library in FCPX and set it to Wide Gamut HDR 2. Imported all clips to this library 3. Slightly adjusted Midtones by lowering brightness to -0.1 (this what I understand Alister Chapman has recommended) 4. Slightly adjusted Hue vs Hue of Hue/Saturation Curve of a few clips to change water color from greenish to blueish. 5. Slightly increased sharpness (3.78) 6. Applied HDR Tool (PQ Output Tone Map) 7. Shared the project as a Master File, using Video Codec: Apple ProRes 422 and Wide Gamut HDR - Rec. 2020 HLG color space 8. Uploaded the Master file to YouTube As you can see from the above steps, I basically did not do any color grading, and all above steps took me only about 5 to 10 min, as I was using adjustment layers, to which I applied most adjustments, rather than to individual clips. Here is the LINK to the 'HDR TV' version of the video. When I watched this video on the my HDR TV (Samsung Q80R, 2019) I was quite impressed with its quality. Then, I watched the same video on my old plasma TV and a 2-year old HDR TV, on iMac, on MacBook Pro (2018), on iPhone X, and on my new Dell laptop (2020). I noticed that colors on these screens got 'washed out' a bit, compared to colors on my HDR TV. So, I decided to create another version of this video (‘SDR TV’ version), in which, in addition to the above steps 1 to 8, I made the following adjustments to increase contrast and brightness: 1. Increased brightness of Highlights up to +0.21 2. Decreased brightness of Shadows down to -0.22 for some clips 3. Increased saturation of Midtones slightly As a result, I got a video with quality quite comparable to the ‘HDR TV’ version (in my humble opinion). As such, it appears that for people who do not watch YouTube videos on an HDR TVs the second version ('SDR TV') would work better. Here is the LINK to the 'SDR TV' version of the video. Most probably, quality of this second video could be improved further by making some additional adjustments, but I already see that shooting in HLG underwater could produce very good quality videos (at least to my taste) without much grading and without a special HDR monitor. I should note, however, that I am not sure how good could be quality of underwater footage shot in HLG picture profile using other cameras. With SONY cameras like the one I have (Sony FDR-AX700 / HXR-NX80 / PXW-Z90), it is very easy to set manual white balance underwater with just one click, and I did it for every single shot. Sometimes, however, when there is not much ‘white’ color in a scene to be used by the camera for reference, you have to experiment a bit, and this is where the mastery is. I am not there yet, and I need to practice more to improve this skill. Also, I would like to mention that I am not an expert in HLG, and if anyone is interested in learning more about advantages of HLG I would refer to experts like Alister Chapman. If you would like to learn more about using HLG in underwater videography, I would refer you to J. M. Núñez’s WEBSITE. Juan has tonnes of experience in shooting HLG underwater, and his website is full of very useful and practical information and tips. Please share your opinion about picture quality of the two versions of my video on HDR and SDR screens when you have time. Thank you all. Stay home and stay healthy. Val
  6. Thank you, Interceptor121. I always like your posts. They get me to research, think and experiment more.
  7. I just posted a short video which Juan M. Núñez helped me to grade and export using Encoder Adobe Premiere MXF Intra 300 4.2.2. I shot all footage used in this video, but because I do not have an HDR monitor, Juan M. Núñez, who has all right equipment, kindly agreed to grade a few of my clips and put this short video together, for which I am very grateful to him. You could visit Juan's website http://wetpixel.es to learn more about underwater videography in general and about using HLG for underwater videography. Also, you could visit his YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnKjMMMzc7HFmFwSy40Nt4g
  8. Thank you for your feedback, Lionfi2s. I appreciate it. I am still learning and experimenting, and honest feedback is always very helpful.
  9. Thank you for your comments. Here is the link again:
  10. Thank you, PhotoJunkie. I appreciate your comments.
  11. Hi Dave, Thank you for your comment ad interest. Most of the times I did not use lights at all, as I thought that I was over-using them. Also, I was experimenting with turning them downwards and even backwards, to avoid scaring fish. Unfortunately, I do not have a good record of that to make any meaningful conclusions. When I used lights, I used two of them. Each arm has two segments: 6 inch and 8 inch. About 25% of all m y clips on the last trip I shot with HLG as an experiment, to see how I could grade them, even though I do not have an HDR monitor. My thinking was that I would future-proof my footage: I could produce an Rec.709 video, but in the future, when I would have an HDR monitor, I could go back to these HLG clips and use them to produce HDR videos. Also, it appears that it is not much more work to grade HLG footage by converting it to SLG Rec.709. I always set WB for every shot. It is very easy with this camera. These clips looks much better on my HDR TV (Samsung). I see much more depth in colors. I hope I answered your questions. You could read an article by Juan on wetpixel.es with his comments about my video: https://wetpixel.es/valera-sakhnenko-filma-en-hdr-hlg-en-raja-ampat-y-utiliza-hdr-fcpx-hdr-a-rec-709-sdr-valera-sakhnenko-films-in-hdr-hlg-in-raja-ampat-and-use-hdr-fcpx-hdr-a-rec-709-sdr/
  12. During my last trip to Raja Ampat I tried shooting HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) with my new camcorder Sony HXR-NX80. Before the trip I had no intention of shooting with HLG, but Juan Miguel Núñez Arellano (http://wetpixel.es) encouraged me to do so and mentored me during the trip providing me with valuable tips, and later - he guided me through post-processing of HLG footage. I am very grateful to Juan for all his time and mentoring. You could visit Juan's YouTube Channel to see his footage shut using HLG and recommended settings. The following video is a collection of 4K underwater video clips shot in HDR HLG, BT2020 color space at various depths: https://youtu.be/JaL6gkwfJQY The following equipment was used to make this video: Camera: Sony camcorder HXR-NX80 Housing: Gates AX700 / Z90 with Gates GP34A Wide Angle Port and internal UR Pro Red Filter Video Lights: Keldan Video 8X 11,000 Lumen CRI 92 (5400K) with Keldan Ambient Filter M1 (10-20m) for 4X/8X Camera Settings: 4K, 30 FPS, Picture Profile: BT2020. I followed this ARTICLE for recommended camera settings. All clips were converted to Rec.709 color space using the following two methods: 1 - FCPX HDR Tool 'HDR to Rec.709 SDR', and 2 - Lemming Camera LUT 'Pro Sony A - HLG to Rec.709 and Custom LUT 'Quicker - Neutral Film'. Please note that: Clip #13 is a comparison between FCPX HDR Tool and RAW file. Clip #14 was shot using SDR Rec.709. Clips #12, 13 and 14 were shot at the same point (Cape Kri site at 35 m) and at about the same time (at about 8:30 am), but clip #14 was shot a different day. It is my understanding that the optimal depth range for the UR Pro Red Filter and Keldan Ambient Filter is between 10 and 20 m, and I found it to be a bit more challenging to grade footage shot outside of that depth range. In most cases, the difference between grading using the above two method is very minor, but I found that grading using Lemming Camera LUT gives a bit better result compared to FCPX HDR Tool (except of Clip #13), but it could be due to a lack of my experience. Also, I should mention that I did not use much video lights as as specific situation demanded. I will keep experimenting with HLG on my next trip. Meanwhile, if you have any questions please let me know. In addition, I will appreciate your comments and constructive criticism. I numbered all clips for the convenience of referencing to them. Best regards and thank you.
  13. Thank you for sharing. Great quality video. I watched it on iMac with color set to Reg. 2020 and full brightness. Colors are fantastic. Have you done any post color corrections? Considering shallow depth, I assume you have not used a red filter.
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