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simonunderwater

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About simonunderwater

  • Rank
    Starfish

Additional Info

  • Show Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  • Camera Model & Brand
    Canon 5D Marck III
  • Camera Housing
    Nauticam
  • Strobe/Lighting Model & Brand
    Inon, weefine

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  1. Nauticam Housing for Small HD 502 5-inch HD Monitor w/ HDMI input support.. 1 year old and ONLY used only once in a pool to test it works. Comes with original box and all working parts. Nothing wrong with this item. Selling as it just doesn't get used. Selling for a knock-down price of £999.00 I paid £1,400 (as that included shipping and duty tax from USA)
  2. Hi Damien Please see my post: http://wetpixel.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=63821 regards Simon
  3. Thank you all for your contribution... Great video Lutfu... And an epic choice of music to accompany the visuals - really impacts on the video. And loved Interceptor121's video with some of the underwater life as the Tuna farm! Thank you all for contributing to my question. This will actually be my first time taking my equipment out into the ocean, so as long as I end up having at least one subject - I will be happy. I will check out Sea Shell - thanks again Simon
  4. Hi All Has anyone got any dive company, dive site suggestions for an upcoming trip to Malta? I am aware that it is not going to be coral or fish abundant, but I will also be travelling with underwater photography equipment setup for macro. So that will be my main focus. thanks in advance
  5. First, you need to be comfortable in the water - so make sure you understand buoyancy and how to be patient in the water, safety must and always should be your first priority. No point getting the best image you ever took only to run out of air while doing it. Second, start with a YouTube and a few books: the most commonly used is Martin Edge's 'The Underwater Photographer'. If you are new to photography on land, then you would need to spend time understanding how the camera works here first. Spend time understanding aperture, ISO, shutter speed. And then apply this to the knowledge of lighting. By spending time on land taking photo's you will start to understand what type of photography you like: landscape, macro, night etc.. This will now allow you to start to think of getting your underwater rig: this is very expensive so you want to make sure you know what style you are after first. Then it's all about 'just giving it a go'. practice makes perfect. And finally: never get disillusioned... sometimes it takes 500 pictures before you get "that perfect one" all the best
  6. Hi all, Last year I purchased a whole Nauticam setup for underwater macro photography (spending just short of £9k!). I went a bit far with my purchases and bought the Nauticam Housing for Small HD 502 5-inch HD Monitor with the intention to also shoot video. I was a little too ambitious with my purchases as I am still very much perfecting my macro photography and have no idea of when I intend to move into shooting video. So my perfect, never been used, Nauticam Housing for Small HD 502 5-inch HD Monitor (which is still in its box and only purchased April 2018) is up for sale. I appreciate that the item is classified as second hand now that I've had for almost one year. But it has never been used and still in its original box. So I will only be accepting fair offers. I am based in Essex, United Kingdom, so happy to meet up with someone to show them the goods for the sale if they are within a 25-mile radius. Many thanks for your time reading this... I hope to share my learning of macro photography in the copious forums with you all in the future.
  7. Hi there... I recently watched the following youtube video which I found very helpful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6kQJ4RowXA I hope it helps you also
  8. For macro photography, strobes are the sole source of light. With longer focal lengths and shooting with small apertures (higher f/stops), very little, if any, ambient light gets to the sensor. The use of one or more strobes is what lights the subject. One strobe can be enough to properly expose a macro shot, assuming the subject is small enough and you are close enough. However, properly exposed does not always mean the lighting is pleasing. Often times one strobe results in harsh shadows and flat images. This can be remedied by the addition of a second strobe acting as fill-light. Additionally, using two strobes allows for more creative options. Hence, dual strobes are highly recommended for anyone who is looking to seriously improve their underwater photography (macro or otherwise). It's important to realize that each subject can be lit in many different ways, and often times the creativity of the shot is in the creativity of the lighting. A great example of this is backlighting. Back-lighting is useful to give subjects a sharp outline. Point the strobe almost straight toward the camera lens, but block it with the macro subject to achieve this effect. An optional second strobe can again be used as a light fill to give the subject some colour. Obviously, this is not always the right lighting technique as it creates a silhouette.
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