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jjmochi

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About jjmochi

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  1. Yes I was really surprised to see my camera float in salt water given I weighted it and calculated it in the bathtub. Thinking back the only difference is I weighted it in fresh water with my dive light attached so when I dove the first 2 dives without it I was missing the weight of a dive light + a clamp. I will weigh it again without and see if that solves the gap. I was using random Chinese brand batteries - worked fine for the TG5 so I didn't think anything of it but will try better batteries next time. I was using it on max because I had read you should start with one setting first, but like you said it was fine when I switched to half or less. Thanks for the other advice- will try fishing weights and jet fins, or maybe the OMS slipstreams which are lighter
  2. Good to know- I will just bring my Tokina 10-17 and my Nikon 35 f1.8 lens for the surface, and the 4.33" dome port which I hope can be used with both lens. Will be there first 2 weeks of Oct (7-18) We are bringing our own dive gear so weight is a real issue, was thinking since we'll have dive lights anyway I can use them as backup if I leave the strobes at home, and focus on learning ambient light. I did read that chapter in Alex Mustard's book and will probably buy the magic filter. Or alternatively I can bring more photo gear and leave the dive gear at home hmm...
  3. Hi phxazcraig- my next trip will be French Polynesia, diving Rangiroa and Fakarava and doing a humpback whale tour on Moorea, which lens did you bring / find was best for shooting the sharks? I was also wondering if the sharks/mantas/dolphins came close enough to be in range of your strobes, or if you shot most scenes with ambient light only? I am debating whether I should bring my strobes as the weight restriction is quite low (only 5kg carry on) You mentioned there are macro shots too- where was that / assume it was not during the pass dives? Or was it in the society islands? Thanks!
  4. Thanks everyone for your advice. I did end up buying the 45 degree viewfinder and taking it with me for 3 days of diving at Anilao. It was a bit hard in the beginning but I got used to it after the first day. I will do a proper trip report later but I'm quite pleased with the results, definitely a lot to learn still but I could see a real improvement over what I was doing before with a PnS. Have not gotten to learning editting yet so I just put everything through the dive+ app. I have a few more questions based on the last trip: 1) I weighted my camera without the float arms in fresh water (bathtub) before the trip and it came out to be 1100g negative. I bought 2 float arms for +450g each, so I should have been -200g negative in freshwater. However in saltwater it was too positive!! Tried it for the first two dives and it kept floating up and was really hard to handle, I also had to add 1kg of weight myself just to descend. I ended up just diving without the float arms for the rest of the trip which was tiring but at least I could stay still. But for the next trip I would like to get the camera weighting right, but don't want to buy new float arms - is there any way to weigh down the camera? I was thinking I'll add my go pro on top but not sure it'll be enough. 2) My legs kept floating up - it was so hard to stay still and impossible to swim backwards. I am using Atomic Splitfins, which I really liked before as I could move through current really easily with minimal effort. The dive shop recommended I get Jetfins instead as they are much heavier. I am wondering if Splitfins are really just not suited for photography and I should buy a second pair of jetfins, or if it's a issue of skill / buoyancy control? 3) My air consumption also went up a lot with the new camera. I ended most dives at 60 min and 50 bar. I used to come up with slightly more air than my husband when I was using the TG5, but this trip he came up with ~90 bar and I am at 50. The only thing that changed was the new camera but I am shocked at how large of a difference it made - curious if others experienced this also and if this will get better over time? 4) I kept bumping my mask against the viewfinder and sometimes it would cause a leak which was annoying - should I be looking through with some distance, or is it correct to have the mask pressed against the viewfinder like you would do on land? 5) Strobes - previously I was using Inon S2000s on TTL, and batteries lasted the full day / 4 dives. I switched to the Inon Z330s on manual this trip and dove the first day on max setting and the batteries ran out during the second dive! Switched to half setting next day and it lasted 3 dives but still ran out on the 4th dive. Is this normal? I'm just surprised there is such a big difference. I was shooting with the 85mm lens on all dives and think I'll try the 60mm lens next time - some things like the giant frogfish, turtles, and stingrays were definitely too large to shoot with the 85mm - I had to be so far away that my strobes (Z330s) couldn't even light it at the highest setting and the water was not clear at all (maybe 5m visibility) so everything came out murky and blurry. Also the dive master told me I moved way too fast - that most photographers only shoot 3 to max 5 subjects per dive. Curious if that's the case? How long do you typically spend on a subject?
  5. So having played around with the camera and housing a bit on land, I am leaning toward biting the bullet for a external viewfinder as well. With the mask on and the regulator in, even on land, I'm finding it quite hard to put my eye flush against the housing. The housing viewfinder image is quite small and I have to tilt my head slightly so my regulator isn't in the way. With that said, I'm still a bit torn between spending the cash on the 180 or the 45. From what people have said and what I can dig up from other threads, I am leaning toward the 45, but want to make sure I fully understand the trade offs? -Better for macro in general -Easier to get low and shoot up, more ergonomic as a result -Not as good for super macro because harder to find the subject -Not as good for night dives or open water where there is little visual reference -Not as good for fast moving objects -Ok for general wide angle/reef scenes -Slightly harder to get used to but not an issue once you adjust -$200 cheaper For the less ideal scenarios, is it better to leave the 45 on or switch back to the housing viewfinder? I am not going to attempt super macro or blackwater photography yet so the only real compromise for me at this point in getting the 45 is for shooting fast moving objects like sharks and mantas. But I'm also a bit confused on which is better for pelagics as I would have thought you shoot up for sharks/mantas anyway so the 45 would have some benefits? Unfortunately the local dive shop does not have either so I can't try (if anyone knows where in Hong Kong I can find one, please let me know!)
  6. I recently made the decision to move to a dslr and so am selling my TG5 camera. Willing to sell everything as a package or individual. Strobes and light only available if you buy everything, otherwise I'll keep it.Everything is in perfect condition (only bought in April this year, and some haven't even hit the water yet). Some pictures below but if you want to see more of anything else let me know! This is a great complete compact setup with everything that you could need.Camera+housing:TG-5 camera, with extra battery and external chargerPT-058 housing, used for 2 trips so far onlySelling the 2 together for $650 If you want to add wide angle lenses: AOI UAL-05 wide angle air lens (0.75x/81 degrees) for $160 (used for 1 trip only)AOI UAL-400A wide angle lens (0.5x/120 degree) with all associated bayonet mount attachments (QRS-01-MB3, QRS-01-AD3, QRS-01-MB2) for $630 (brand new/never used yet)To complete the package - $100 for all of the below:Standard double handed tray with easy trigger attachment2 5 inch float arms2 3 inch arms6 clamps1 fiber optics 2-to-1 sync cable housing lanyard to attach to your bcdAnd with lighting:2 Inon S2000 strobes - not available individuallyX-adventure M1000 smart focus light with cold shoe mount attachment - not available individuallyEverything except strobes/light I will sell for $1500.Everything including the strobes/light I will sell for $2200. If you want the others (tray/arms/clamps/etc) individually let me know but probably not as efficient with the shipping cost from HK.I am in Hong Kong and can meet up locally or ship worldwide if buyer payers shipping. Pictures here: https://www.scubaboard.com/community/threads/complete-almost-new-tg-5-setup.582562/
  7. Very helpful, thanks everyone! Have ordered the vacuum and can't wait to test everything out in Anilao next month
  8. Hi, I'm Joanna from HK. I'm a newbie photographer and a semi-experienced diver, travelling mostly in SE Asia. I just brought a Nikon D7500 and looking forward to improving my underwater photography
  9. Hi all, I'm currently using a TG-5 in Olympus housing with 2 Inon S2000 strobes, a focus light, and the AOI UWL-400 wide angle lens. After taking 3 dive trips with the camera I've decided to upgrade to a dslr setup since I was pretty frustrated with the TG-5's lack of manual control, shutter speed, and low light performance. The deciding point was when I went to Malapascua and couldn't take a single good picture of the thresher shark over 3 days, as no lights or strobes were allowed. I also had a lot of trouble taking good pictures of the mandarin fish mating since they moved so fast and I couldn't shine a focus light on it. So I've decided on a Nikon D7500 since it seemed to be a good mid-range option and bought the Nauticam housing. I bought 2 lenses, the Tokina 10-17mm which seems to be widely recommended for wide angle, and the Nikon AF-S 85mm which seems like a good compromise between the typical 60mm and 105mm recommendations. I bought the recommended zoom gear for Tokina + the 4.33" dome port, and the compact port base + macro port 30 per Nauticam's port chart. All in that already cost me over US$6000 and I'm debating whether or not I want to continue to purchase the below items, which based on my research seems to be "nice to haves" but not totally critical: -Nauticam vacuum pump- I haven't had any issues with my TG5, and no issues with my Go Pro Hero 5 before that. We've been diving for 3 years and never had a flood so questioning whether it's worth the $200? -Nauticam external viewfinder - either 45 or 180. I read the 45 is really good for macro but it takes a long time to get used to, and not recommended if you only take a few dive trips a year? I wouldn't mind paying for it if it's easy to get used to but I wouldn't want to pay $1000 for it if I need to waste a few dives at the beginning of every trip getting used to it -a macro diopter, thinking through Subsee+10, Nauticam SMC-1, and Aquako III. My next trip is to Anilao, but wondering if I will take a few days to adjust to the 85mm macro lens before I can move on to supermacro anyway, so if I can push this purchase further down the line? The Aquako appeals to me the most because of its small size and price, but it's a 52mm thread. If I get a swing mount, then use a 52 to 67mm setdown ring, then attach the Aquako, will there be too much distance between the lens and the diopter to be effective? My next trips will be 1) Anilao, 2) French Polynesia, 3) Maldives - so thinking macro lens for 1) and just the wide angle for 2) and 3)? I will also have the standard 18-55mm kit lens, should I try to use it with the 4.33" dome port or the macro port? Lastly I'm debating what to do with my TG5. I can 1) give it to my husband who isn't really a photographer, and who also has the go pro hero 5, 2) try to sell it- but seems like a waste for something that's only been on 30 dives, or 3) take it with me as a backup camera? Thanks!
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