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Found 3 results

  1. Hi eveyone, Like many of you, for many years I have stuck a pack of silica gel at the bottom of my housings, to prevent condensation issues. This has seen me condensation free for 10+ years, including diving in tropical places (with/without air conditioned closing of the housing), and temperate areas in all seasons. My longest-lasting silica gel pack is the one pictured below, which I must have got in a shoe box, it has sat in my Nauticam D500 housing for the last 6 years (and I can't remember, perhaps it was in the previous housing already). Anyways, yesterday I opened my housing, to find my D500 DSLR and the parts of the housing covered in condensation!!!! What's weirder: I had put back the camera there so that it's would be ready for next dive (I find my housings the safest place to store DSLRs when not in use), and it had been sitting there for the last 2 weeks, the housing itself was sitting on our laundry room, which is slightly moist, but hey, it's been sitting there for many years. Noteworthy: I had NOT vaccumed the housing that time. I tried everything, found the desiccant pack very moist, so it was time to dry it up and rejuvinate my silica gel. Googling the best way to do it (oven, microwave...) I realized that: 1/ there isn't much good guidance available online. Most of the articles refer to free-flowing silica crystals that you can look at (colour change indicates if they are saturated in water or not), the idea being to pack them in a box, in one's camera bag. But these boxes are too big to fit in our housings 2/ I am still unclear why that condensation formed at home. INTERESTINGLY I've read somewhere (can't find the link anymore...) that saturated silica crystals (having absorved the max of their water capacity) may release that moisture on their own, without heating. Could it be that my silica pack went on strike and tried to flood my housing on land?!? All-in-one, I am curious what you people do to keep your silica pack doing it's job? If you do use paper silica bags like I do, how do you heat them up, how do you know when the crystals are dried enough? (apparently, if you heat them up too much, you may impair their water absorption capacity). Have a great day, Nicolas
  2. Does anyone know how to completely disassemble Nauticam standard viewfinder? Even if I can evaporate the moisture out there appears to be some deposits left. In the attached image the last O-ring remaining seems to be impossible to grip to pull out. Not sure what else I'd have to do afterward. Thanks in advance for directing me to any resources or threads about this. Kurt
  3. Before going on my dive this morning, I found a spot of condensation about the size of a US quarter on the inside of my Subsea +5. It was pretty hot and humid this morning so I placed the lens in the water to cool it down and to see if the condensation would go away. It did shrink the size down by a bit and by the end of the dive it had gone completely. At the end of the dive after sitting outside for no more than 10 minutes, the condensation came back. Now that I'm home and the lens is in my air conditioned house it's completely gone and the lens is clear. Is this a defect in the lens? I would think that the unit should be completely sealed and no condensation should appear on the inside. I couldn't find any droplets of water inside the lens upon inspection so nothing appears to be getting inside the lens. Any ideas would be appreciated.
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