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gianster

D70 Ike ITTL

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Hello,

What metering mode do most people shoot with wide angle and or macro. Matrix, Center Weighted, or Spot if using Ike ITTL? I used Spot for Macro and worked quite well but now am going to try Wide angle this coming trip. Any suggetions?

 

Thanks

Gianni

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For WA, try using Centre-weighted. It often yields better results than matrix...

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Along the same lines... What shooting mode would work best with the Ike TTL housing?

And why..

 

Joe

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It all depends on the subject, the composition, how much natural light you want, etc. What I did when I used TTL on film (I no longer use it on digital), was 3D matrix if I had a subject covering most of the frame, or spot if the subject was small and in the center of the frame.

 

If the subject is silver or black, or if it is small, offcenter and there is a large blue background TTL won't work properly, and all kinds of compensation have to be used. Use your LCD to evaluate the result and change the settings acordingly, that's the beauty of digital, immediate feedback.

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Preface:

 

There are two types of metering going on.

 

First is the camera's ambient light meter. In manual mode, this meter merely provides you with what the camera thinks the proper ambient exposure should be. In non-manual mode, it actually sets the aperture and/or shutter speed based on what it thinks the ambient exposure should be. This meter is the one that is set to spot, center, or matrix. This setting tells the camera how to evaluate the scene to come up with the "should be" answer.

 

Second is the flash meter. This determines the duration of flash when a flash is attached.

 

Answers to the question:

 

Your question assumes the strobe is set on some form of automatic flash exposure (TTL, iTTL, etc.).

 

For macro mode, the answer is that it doesn't matter, unless you are using exposure modes that are inappropriate for macro photography.

 

Explanation:

 

In almost all circumstances your desired aperture and shutter speed will be set to a exposure value far less than that recommended by the exposure meter regardless of the method (spot, center or matrix). That is why you have a flash gun. E.g. set your camera manually to 1/60 and f/22 and your exposure meter will tell you are well underexposed. The exception would be to create an effect via rear curtain sync.

 

For wide angle, the answer is that it doesn't matter. If you set your exposure based on the light meter in any of the modes, it will almost always be wrong. It may be correct, but this is by happenstance, like a broken clock is correct twice a day.

 

Explanation:

 

The light meter gives you an ambient light exposure value. Any flash will add to the exposure value, thereby creating a relative overexposure. Now, the result way work, but that would be caused by the meter and metering method producing a intentional or even unintentional underexposure. The exception is that some shooters will use TTL flash control for wide angle, but use a minus exposure compensation of anywhere from -.5 to -2 to get the correct results.

 

For scenic wide angle, I use spot meter. I meter a spot outside the range of the strobe (e.g. blue water) that I want to be my medium gray and set the exposure. I manually set strobe power to properly expose the foreground (whatever will be lit by the strobe).

 

If you set your exposure using center weighted, then the results can vary depending on the relative positioning of objects in the scene. E.g. if the ambient part of the scene is darker and outside of the center, the ambient exposure setting will be greater and the ambient part of the scene (untouched by strobes) will be too dark.

 

Matrix metering will look at the entire scene (including areas that will be ambient and those that will be flashed). Adding TTL strobe power will generally overexpose some part of the image.

 

The common misconception is that if one sets the camera ambient light meter to spot, the TTL flash is also using that spot to determine the amount of flash. This is just not true. It doesn't work that way.

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