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A few IDs I am struggling with....

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Can anyone help me with these - I am struggling with them...

 

Cheers

 

Paul

 

 

Length 30 mm, location Lembeh..._WHT0091.jpg

 

Length 40 mm, location Lembeh...[_WHT0452.jpg

 

Length 15 mm, location Lembeh...[_WHT0494.jpg

 

Length 15 mm, location Lembeh...[_WHT0437.jpg

 

This one (following) I have searched and believe its an unnamed/identified Thecacera but want to check to see if any one else has seen it in Indonesia (this on is at Panti paragi in Lembeh) before I make a fool of myself sending it seaslugforum _WHT9660.jpg

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The dragonet in the shell...looks like either a Morrison's Dragonet Synchiropus morrisoni or a Bartels' Dragonet Synchiropus bartlesi in red phase...

 

Could be way off... <_ src="%7B___base_url___%7D/uploads/emoticons/default_unsure.png" alt=":unsure:">

 

~Matt Segal

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Hi Paul - glad to see you've found some time to work on your Lembeh images. I won't touch the fish (happy, Veitch?) but both branchs are undescribed. The first is Philinopsis sp. 1 on the Sea Slug Forum. The second isn't on the Forum, you'll find some images of it on www.edge-of-reef.com as Thecacera sp UI; I've seen other images of it from various locations in Indonesia. The flatworm is Pseudobiceros gratus.

Cheerio --

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wow - great pictures!

 

First one I could find:

 

_WHT0437.jpg

 

a young weedy scorpionfish: Rhinopias frondosa.. its a guess but probably correct.

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_WHT9660.jpg

 

I would put it as: Thecacera cf. pacifica -

It is probably a color variation of the above species, but one can never be sure with seaslugs... If the variations can be as big as with Thecacera picta then probably pacifica would fit the above seaslug.

 

Philippe

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_WHT0494.jpg

 

Didn't find anything - only a possible genus: Helcogramma from the family: Tripterygiidae.

 

Philippe

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Leslie has put already id on the nudis and flatworm :unsure:

 

The first nudi is really an amazing animal

 

Philippe

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Many thanks,

 

here's another one that has me stumped - an anemonefish with black shading in the pelvic and pectoral fins..... am wondering if its a localized version of Premna biaculeatus or a new species (have just gone through Gerald Allen and Daphne Fautin's book on Anemonefishes and but nothing with such markings - even the juv examples)

 

 

 

_WHT9779.jpg

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Many thanks,

 

here's another one that has me stumped - an anemonefish with black shading in the pelvic and pectoral fins..... am wondering if its a localized version of Premna biaculeatus or a new species (have just gone through Gerald Allen and Daphne Fautin's book on Anemonefishes and but nothing with such markings - even the juv examples)

 

I'm no expert , but as an amateur admirer of anemonefish, I find this very interesting, Paul. I assume it is from Lembeh as well. Do you have any other photos that show more of the body?

 

The anemone host appears to be Entacmaea Quadricolor, which as you likely know plays host to over a dozen types of anemonefish. I'm not sure it is PREMNAS BIACULEATUS as I don't see the cheek spine, but the host is correct. The general features (except for the black shading) I can see in the photo look to me more like AMPHIPRION OCELLARIS, but the host anemone seems wrong. :o

 

I'l watch this thread with interest.

Good luck. :unsure:

Cheers.

Michael.

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There are many location specific colour variations of all of the clownfish species. See http://wish.wodonga.tafe.edu.au/~kwaldon/species.htm for descriptions of many of the different variations. (click on the species to see the variations within that speices)

 

Your clownfish is a very interesting slightly melanistic A. percula.

 

There is no spine so it cannot be Perimnas which leaves A. percula and A. ocellaris as the only possible cantidates. A. percula and ocellaris are very difficult to distinguish to the utrianed eye(in fact for a while, there was controversy if they were one species or two).

 

This colour pattern is of characteristic of a melanistic percula. melanistic ocellaris grow black in a different pattern. This is the most clear identifying feature of this example. But another difference between is the shape of the head, which also confirms percula.

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hers another I cannot find either

 

_WHT0628.jpg

 

I will dig out a side shot of the anemonefish today and post it

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This is the nearest I got to a side shot Clearly I was wrong becuase no spine. On this one you can see theres black markings on all fins and 3 white bars

post-1614-1139624535_thumb.jpg

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Yes, it's a juvenile male spinecheek anemonefish - aka maroon clown. The young have black on their fins - check out the baby captive bred ones on the ORA website.

 

Cheers

James

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hers another I cannot find either 

 

Didn't we id an earlier shot of one of these? It's a very common & well known undescribed Janolus. It's listed as Janolus sp A (or sp. 1) in the japanese books & is even on the front cover of Tonozuka's Opisthobranchs of Bali & Indonesia.

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Thanks Leslie,

 

ah well not so rare. I didnt know of those books - am definitely going to order from Seachallengers

 

44t.gif

 

The earlier species you kindly IDed for me is somewhat different http://www.envirosea.com/gallery/v/mollusc...cleatr.jpg.html

 

I have a really strange photograph for you tomorrow - a nudi but... well you will see, not your average example (I think it/they are laying eggs but kinda wierd). I will post in a new thread.

 

Paul

 

PS dont forget to send me your address so I can mail the files

 

Cheers James,

 

Yes the black markings are quite clear from the site ORA

 

Paul

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Yes, I remember that one; the sp. A must have been for some one else. I guess I have too many worms in my head to remember much else! :unsure:

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Nice picture of the janolus sp. Still rare I think. We have had 2 encounters with it and the second time we saw one we took it and put in an alcholol solution for scientists of the NMHN - but no news from it anymore. I have to ask Guido if he knows what happened to it. Here are some pictures of ours: janolus species

 

Philippe

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_WHT0494.jpg

 

Didn't find anything - only a possible genus: Helcogramma from the family: Tripterygiidae.

 

Philippe

 

I'm quite certain that fish is not a triplefin...the mouth and eye placement look identical to a dragonet species.

 

~Matt Segal

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Paul,

 

Again, you have a wonderful pic there of the Janolus sp., Bill has it listed as Janolus sp #4 and it looks like it is found on both the reef and mucky environs (I found it in super-muck, Bali).

 

My avatar here is the same Janolus sp, free-swimming. Its translucence is really interesting.

 

And here is a post of a few pics of it from Bali and Leslie's ID of it from a few months ago on DD:

 

http://www.digitaldiver.net/yabbse/index.p...49032#msg149032

 

Again wonderful pics!!!

 

Thanks, Carol

 

PS plus gorgeous little weedy!!! We saw a couple of "parent" weedys in between Alor and Flores, but I would have loved to see the little one!!!

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