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james

Good Article about Focus Lights

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"I have to disagree w/ Silvio on intensity, I shoot lots of macro work with teleconverters, or w/ the 70-180 lens, and a powerful focus light is an excellent addition for even daytime focusing."

 

I don't shoot your glass but I do, on occasion, shoot the 200mm F4 micro-nikkor, which can be a black hole in some conditions and the LED (mine is a Nocturnal, I don't know what you tried) is more than sufficient for my needs. The fact that neither you nor your camera recognize LED light during the day is very curious to me. I was starting to think this was an issue of system focus sensitivity, but since your eyes can't see LED light during the day it sounds like that and more.

 

But in any case my LED works perfectly *for me* and my rig, and I find the halogen Fixlight to have been overkill, not only in intensity but also running cost, short burn time and subject distress (I didn't suffer the reliability issues others here have alluded to). Even when I dialed it down the critters still evidenced more discomfort than same animal does with LED. Halogens burn hot and the subjects seem to be bothered by it.

 

The Fisheye LED with output control sounds even better than my Nocturnal, unless it's upper output levels are not similar.

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QUOTE(bmyates @ Jun 22 2006, 08:49 PM)

One question: is there any reason I can't use Lithium AA batteries in any of these lights, instead of NiMH or alkaline AA batteries? The biggest drawback of the Sea & Sea (as I see it) is only a 40 minute burn time, and without adjustable power output, that's not even enough for one night dive! Since lithiums last at least 3-4 times longer, I could get at least two full night dives out of a set...but I'm not sure if they can hurt the light itself in some way... unsure.gif

 

Check battery voltages, I believe the Lithium ones are 0.2V or so less so you won't get the full light output. However, that wouldn't hurt the bulb and if it is enough light the longer duration may be worth it. Again check the info on the package as I may be wrong on this one.

Bart

 

I was doing bit of checking today. Rechargeable NiMH AA batteries are rated at 1.2V. Lithium and regular disposable alkaline AA batteries are both rated at 1.5V.

 

Literature suggests lithium batteries last up to seven times longer than regular alkalines. So other than possibly substantially much greater duration, Lithiums have 25% more voltage and are moderately lighter in weight.

 

Anyone ever use lithium batteries for strobes? Any opinions regarding duration or opinions on the increased output compared to NiMH or regular alkalines.

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A couple of notes on the Fantasea LED44 (or EBay version Suprema44).

 

It's a good light for macro, especially on a compact camera, where one of the other lights costs more than the camera and housing combined. It works great on my Ike/Fuji E900, I've modified one of the port mounts to fit the lens adapter so that the light is right over the lens and frees up the sides for dual strobes. There is also a dual mount, but it seems pretty awkward.

 

LED light in general seems to get washed out in brighter clear conditions, but in typical Puget Sound conditions, or night diving (are they one and the same?), they work great.

 

Although the manufacturer says that you can use NiCads (but not NiMh for some reason - cell size?), my experience is that the .25v difference is pretty noticeable and the rechargeable batteries drain fairly quickly. So I recommend that you only use Alkalines. Lithiums should work fine as well, but as I get 3-4 days worth of shooting on a liveaboard trip out of a load I haven't bothered.

 

The only other issue with the light is that you have to be quite careful not to break off the mounting tab when unscrewing the top, having a small strap wrench along is useful.

 

Jack

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We recieved 2 of these on our first order, and they are both sold. The intensity is 1/4 that of the halogen fix light, and there is more of a hot spot, but for someone desiring an LED light this is an excellent way to go.

 

A conversion is not possible, the new light uses AA batteries, and the internal construction is very different.

 

Hi Ryan,

 

Having looked at the internal construction, would you say that the LED board is replaceable? What I'd like to do is try modifying one to use red LEDs to maximise the "ratio" of focus assist to fish bothering, while keeping the battery life as long as possible.

 

Thanks,

 

Martyn

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>I was doing bit of checking today. Rechargeable NiMH AA batteries are rated at 1.2V. Lithium and regular disposable alkaline AA batteries are both rated at 1.5V.

Literature suggests lithium batteries last up to seven times longer than regular alkalines. So other than possibly substantially much greater duration, Lithiums have 25% more voltage and are moderately lighter in weight.

Anyone ever use lithium batteries for strobes? Any opinions regarding duration or opinions on the increased output compared to NiMH or regular alkalines. <

 

 

I've been using lithium AAs almost exclusively in my Inon Z220's for several years, and have been VERY happy with them. The only possible downside is that, in rapid-fire shooting, the lithiums apparently don't recycle quite as fast as NiMH AAs. But they DO last a heck of a lot longer (I get about 10 dives @ 50-100 shots/dive per dive), and I like that because it means opening the strobes a lot less frequently (hence, less chances of flooding). I just suggest that -- for really long trips -- you take along at least one set of NiMH's in case you happen to run out of lithiums. You can probably use someone else's charger if that happens, but you'll want your own batteries. For shorter trips (7-10 days), you can easily pack enough lithiums to last the whole trip.

 

One note of warning: the higher voltage means that it is possible that you won't be able to use lithiums in some gadgets. Thus far, I've only found one thing -- a Princeton Tec Surge flashlight -- that lithiums didn't work on (blew the bulb out).

Edited by bmyates

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The Lithium AA and Alkaline AA batteries will pop bulbs in the Sea & Sea LX-15. They are fine in the Fisheye LED Light.

 

I wouldn't try replacing the leds w/ red LED's, but I've written Fisheye to see if a run could be produced as it is an intriguing idea.

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I wouldn't try replacing the leds w/ red LED's, but I've written Fisheye to see if a run could be produced as it is an intriguing idea.

 

A far simpler (albeit less elegant) solution is to simply buy some red celophane and use a rubber band to put it over the front of your light when you need it. I bought two different "darknesses" (don't know what the technical term is) of red celo at B&H awhile back based on someone else's recommendation on that topic.

 

The specific celophane I bought was one sheet (at a cost of a whopping $5.65) each of:

Roscolux #26 Filter - Light Red - 20x24" Sheet, and

Roscolux #27 Filter - Medium Red - 20x24" Sheet

Edited by bmyates

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Hi Bruce,

 

yeah that's certainly the easiest solution, but I'd prefer to have a red light for efficiency's sake. If you gel a white light you're probably throwing away around 3/4 of the luminous output, so a red light of the same red output would last about 4 times as long.

 

I've got a red Luxeon LED bulb replacement that I'll be looking for a small dive light to fit it at the dive show on sunday. I doubt what I end up with will be as fit for purpose as the Fix light though.

 

Martyn

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I think Xeon bulb or even Luxeon LED already out dated.......

 

high output CREE LED DIVE light already appear at Asia. fisheye FIX20DX size with 480 Lumens, 3.5 hrs burning time @ full power. 60 degree reflector without hotspot.

 

The cons is.........just too bright for those little bashful fish.

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