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Sacandaga Man

Shutter speed when using strobe

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What is the optimum shutter speed for a totally manual camera when using a strobe? If my light meter suggest a combo of shutter speed and f-stop based on natural lighting - how do I reconcile this?

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Trial and error, that's what the LCD is for :D Just kidding, it depends on what you are photographing and which results you are looking for. In other words, there is no optimum shutter speed.

 

If you want to stop action you will need a fast shutter speed. If you want a photo well lit by natural light, just use whatever the camera suggests as a good exposure for ambient light and set the strobe to a low power setting to avoid blowouts. If you want to isolate your subject with a dark background use high shutter speed, etc...

 

I hope this helps.

 

Luiz

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Most cameras can do flash sync from 1/250, and slower.

 

Any shutter speed much slower than 1/100th has a tendency to how motion blur, depending on focal length. You can use 1/60th if the surge is non existent, and the subjects are not trying to escape.

 

So the useful range of SS is say 1/100 to what ever your max flash sync speed is.

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Yes, but that depends on focal length too. With a 10mm fish eye lens you can take sharp pictures with shutter as slow as 1/20 (I did that). The rule of motion blur below 1/100th applies to macro lenses (60+mm) but not wide angles. That's why I asked what specific goals he had...

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That's why I said "depending on focal length".

 

But subject motion blur is more independent of focal length than camera motion blur.

 

A blue spot grouper will still show the spots blurred, with a wide angle lens, if you are close enough to show the spots, at 1/20th.

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shouldn't we be bringing up the fact that in general, underwater with a strobe, that the shutter speed controls the exposure of the ambient background, and the aperture controls the light to the foreground from the strobes.

 

I know, simplistic... but a good starting point to understanding the underwater speed/aperture relationship, no?

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To add to the mix, there is a simple rule of thumb on land for ambient light shooting if you want photos with no camera movement ;

 

"The longest hand hold speed is the reciprocal of the focal length"

 

so a 60mm lens = 1/60th of a second, 20mm lens = 1/20th, etc.

 

as I said it is a rule of thumb, and U/W you can usually go with slightly longer speeds due to the stability afforded by the water.

 

Don't forget that will only stop camera movement, subject movement is another thing, but depending on the situation your strobe should take care of stopping the movement of the subject

 

....hmmmm, I am thinking full frame here; I haven't considered the effect of the cropped sensors change of effective magnification on camera movement. But thinking on the fly maybe the 1/focal length rule will work u/w with cropped sensor given the waters aid to stability....

Edited by photovan

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