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mcarey

Help. I have a publisher asking to use an image.

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Hello Everyone,

I have a publisher who has asked to use an image of mine for a full page spread in a magazine.I know that is the good part and I am flattered.

Now the bad part.I dont have a clue what to charge. Can any of you pros help out?

Thanks.

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Congrats! That must be exciting for you but a little more info required.

 

First up, most magazines already have a standard pricing set for this sort of thing. You should send them an email asking if you can be sent a copy of their rates sheet.

 

Also, pay is very much predicated upon the size and circulation of the magazine.

 

For instance, a small magazine with a circulation of 20 000 will pay a lot less than one with 200 000 and then there are those with 2 million....

 

Also, rates in small markets like Asia, Australia, Canada will be smaller than Europe and the US

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Congrats! That must be exciting for you but a little more info required.

 

First up, most magazines already have a standard pricing set for this sort of thing. You should send them an email asking if you can be sent a copy of their rates sheet.

 

Also, pay is very much predicated upon the size and circulation of the magazine.

 

For instance, a small magazine with a circulation of 20 000 will pay a lot less than one with 200 000 and then there are those with 2 million....

 

Also, rates in small markets like Asia, Australia, Canada will be smaller than Europe and the US

 

 

Thanks Mike,The designer says that it will be for an inside cover and will be 9x12.It is for a publication that is (The State of the worlds sea turtles ) and the printing is in the less than 10,000 range.

 

 

This is only their second publication and it is geared more towards researchers than the general public.

I dont want to give the photo away but on the same note it would be nice to recoup some of my costs.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

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Hello Everyone,

I have a publisher who has asked to use an image of mine for a full page spread in a magazine.I know that is the good part and I am flattered.

Now the bad part.I dont have a clue what to charge. Can any of you pros help out?

Thanks.

 

 

Good for you.

 

Have you registered the image with the Library of Congress? © it now - its easy.

 

Be sure you pull together a strong license agreement. Looking at my past experience (and software) for one-time, non-exclusive, print only, USA only, English only, 10k-25k print run you are in a range of 400 - 1200. Seriously.

 

This plays out in what type of magazine it is. If it "Platinum - Gifts for Billionaires" then you'll get the 1200.00 but it sounds like your Mag. is science/conservation oriented. You'll be back at the other end I am afraid.

 

Above all else whatever fee you accept is up to you (what you ard comfortable with) but cover you long-term butt, don't give away the farm by not using a acrefully worded licenses argreement stating exactly what usage rights the editor is licensing the payment and put "Only". Also put: " No rights are granted until License/Invoice is paid in full. Publication of images without full payment constitutes a violation of copyright."

 

Good luck.

 

Paul

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Ok ... I have never tried selling my images I have just used them locally .. but $400 seems like a lot.

 

If this is the case then I am going to be jumping in the water more often and start firing off emails to the guys in the magazines !

 

I know we have had other threads on this .. but it is rare that actual figures get thrown around as the mags (as was said) normally have their fixed rates for one time use.

Are those fixed rates seriously going to be in the 400 - 1200 range ?

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This seems to be a relatively small run, one time use, and is not world wide distribution. The highest paying scuba diving magazines have paid $400, the lowest paying $75 for a full page. "Research" based or science based have paid $200-250. Ask first if they have a set scale. If not, check out stock prices online at the agencies. Many have built in calculators for usage. Make up a written contract with specifics spelled out clearly. Good luck, and congratulations.

Cheers,

Marli

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Hi Marli,

 

You are right it probably is a small run, low volume usage, but to ask the magazine if they have a set scale would be like walking into a store and having them ask you what you want to pay for a product except in this case we are talking about the right to use the image. It doesn't happen. They tell you whatr you are going to pay. When a magazine goes to Getty they don't tell Getty what they will pay (all other things being equal)> Getty breaks the usage rights down to their most basic single usage and charges for every little bit of use the client is to get from the picture.

 

With all do respect, don't you think a photographer should set his/her own rates and negotiate from there. Find you what usage rights the client wants (all of them, exactly) and then open the negotiation. Why give them the advantage by asking what they will pay when we all know very well what they will want to pay will not be what the image is worth? No matter what sort of image is being licensed.

 

Best

Paul

 

 

This seems to be a relatively small run, one time use, and is not world wide distribution. The highest paying scuba diving magazines have paid $400, the lowest paying $75 for a full page. "Research" based or science based have paid $200-250. Ask first if they have a set scale. If not, check out stock prices online at the agencies. Many have built in calculators for usage. Make up a written contract with specifics spelled out clearly. Good luck, and congratulations.

Cheers,

Marli

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Hi Marli,

 

With all do respect, don't you think a photographer should set his/her own rates and negotiate from there. Find you what usage rights the client wants (all of them, exactly) and then open the negotiation. Why give them the advantage by asking what they will pay when we all know very well what they will want to pay will not be what the image is worth? No matter what sort of image is being licensed.

Unfortunately, this is not how it works, at least, in the dive industry. What you'll find is that the magazines have more than one kind of contract, each with standard rates. Those that accept standard rates get published. Those that don't, don't.

 

There is sometimes room for negotiation, but not always. :P

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Yes, $400 - $1,200 is the correct pricing range. Inside front covers command more than a full page inside use.

Other factors are Usage Rights: One-time, non-exclusive EDITORIAL use, North American, English Language Rights sounds like it's appropriate here, but perhaps not.

 

Does the publisher intend on "electronic" use in addition to print use? For example: website use, CD/DVD, eBook. Other additional uses not included in the magazine use would be advertising (this is not for use in

an ad is it?), trade show, etc....that's why you MUST spell out your precise usage in your invoice as all these

additional usages command additional fees!

 

Make sure you specify a credit line and how it is to read. If you have a website, you may want to use

your URL as a credit line.

 

Another, perhaps most important consideration, is how rare or difficult is your subject matter to come by?

Are there a lot of other photos out there which the publisher could use as alternatives? If your photo is

hard to duplicate by others, you can fee more confident quoting a higher price.

 

Even considering the low print run, try for $800. Remember, you can always come down in price but

it's difficult (even though I've done it!) to go back up! I always prefer quoting on the phone, and I don't

want to hear the editor or art director smiling on the other end-I'd rather hear them squirm!

 

Best,

 

Tom

 

http://www.tomstackphoto.com

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mcarey,

 

Please take a moment to let us know how this turned out!

 

Thanks,

 

Tom Stack

 

http://www.tomstackphoto.com

 

Hello Tom and group,

A progress report on where we are at with the publisher.

I have been dealing with the graphics designer who is incharge of the publication.I came up with the price of $200.00 after looking at all the links and considering the advice from all of you here in this forum.

The first response that I got was she would have to look to see if it was in the budget.

I kindly sent her an e-mail and asked her if she was working for free. And as a person in the industry she should understand that I must be paid for my work.That got a super fast reply that she understood and would talk to the board about payment.

 

It must be a miricle the board was able to find $200.00 from the budget to pay a lowly photographer for one of his images. She was going to send me the e-mail address of who to send the contract and invoice to.

 

Im still waiting. The publication is to go to print for distribution next month.I will be in attendance at the symposium where it is to be handed out.

 

I guess that I am just a trusting fool!!

If I dont hear back by tomarrow I will send them an e-mail and remind them that I own the rights to that image and need to be paid before it goes to print.

Yes I was a fool and sent them the image before payment.

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mcarey,

 

You did good and you learned in the process. I don't think you need to push too hard at this point,

I believe you will get paid. Did you get your credit line? We estimate we pick up over 20% of new

business from credit lines.

 

Congratulations!

 

Tom

 

http://www.tomstackphoto.com

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mcarey,

 

Eric, Mike and Tom Stack are spot in concerning the dive industry rates. Not much wiggle room. Outside the industry I'd recommend the following.......

 

For future uses you might want to look up Editorial Photographers (www.editorialphoto.com) or www.asmp.org for their respective calculators.

 

I also have a software program called fotoquote and it is a good baseline, too. In my limited experience it is better to sell one photo for a decent amount, then sell many for low amounts. But use your own judgement....

 

Finally, Tom is exactly correct about requiring a decent byline which can lead other potential buyers to your web site, or whatever....

 

Good luck!

 

dhaas

www.haasimages.com

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Congrats on getting payment, that is great.

 

As Tom says, I wouldn't worry too much about pushing about payment quite yet. In the magazine world they have up to 90 days after publication before they legally have to send out payment.

 

We all need to be trusting alright.

 

M

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Just want to add to dhaas' reply, here is the software: http://www.fotoquote.com/fq-overview.html

 

For a single image it may not be worth it but to anyone wanting to sell images now and then, it can be very useful.

 

As for who is to set the price; i totally agree that as photographers we must be in charge of our product. And as much as possible the price. Unfortuantely many very talented amateurs flood the market with free pictures, not taking into account the time and money they have put into getting the shots. Make sure you're not one of them!

 

There is a value to dealing with pro's (many on this forum i would consider pro's even if all of you don't make a living as photographers), and as such you and I are entiteled to reasonable monetary compensation for the use of our images.

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As for who is to set the price; i totally agree that as photographers we must be in charge of our product. And as much as possible the price. Unfortuantely many very talented amateurs flood the market with free pictures, not taking into account the time and money they have put into getting the shots. Make sure you're not one of them!

 

There is a value to dealing with pro's (many on this forum i would consider pro's even if all of you don't make a living as photographers), and as such you and I are entiteled to reasonable monetary compensation for the use of our images.

 

This is something I always wanted to know: As there are a lot of wetpixel people that sell images the question is: How do you start? who did you contact? is it something like sending a portfolio to the magazines?... I get the feeling that, at least in Spain (a very bad paid UWP market), is something very related to friendship etc...

 

As I have never sold an image or never had the opportunity to print one I understand the "many very talented amateurs who flood the market with free pictures" but I think they do it because they don´t have information of the market and can´t get it.... so just the "glory" of seeing one of their pictures in a magazine is enough. I imagine pros don´t like to give info like their contacts, their prices etc... but, in todays image-flooding era, this may go against them as amateurs will lower prices because of this lack of info...

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Hi davichin,

 

There are many resources out there to help you find new markets and determine pricing.

 

One of the best, and a good starting point available by subscription is:

 

http://www.photosource.com/index.php

 

Best,

 

Tom Stack

 

http://www.tomstackphoto.com

 

Thank you very much, Tom!

 

Maybe there should be a topic where people could tell how they sell or contact different buyers... :)

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You also have to look at YOU. If you are an unknown they aren't as likely to budge like if they were dealing with Steven Frink. There is often many other options for magazines and you alone are not the panacea of their quest. The range is appropriate and often times getting in a magazine for repeat business means working within their parameters early on.

 

Joe

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You also have to look at YOU. If you are an unknown they aren't as likely to budge like if they were dealing with Steven Frink. There is often many other options for magazines and you alone are not the panacea of their quest. The range is appropriate and often times getting in a magazine for repeat business means working within their parameters early on.

 

Joe

 

Great thread - I thought i'd throw in my $0.02.

 

I am unfamiliar with diving industry publications, but I think the most transparent thing, as to the rates you can expect from a publication, are its advertising rates. Portfolio magazine, or GQ, which run mass quantities of glossy mags catering to high-powered markets, charge an arm and a leg for advertising, and accordingly, pay quite a bit for photos. In the same vein, smaller magazines catering to business people, even those without gargantuan print runs generally pay quite well.

 

For what you're describing - a nonprofit, or for profit org issuing a trade publication, you would expect certainly less than (in line with what you got).

 

I've found that software programs such as photoquote are good for determining a starting point - and are illuminating in understanding how pricing works. You can also tool around on ipn-stock's website with their built in calculators.

 

When it comes down to it, however, pricing is an art and most publications will pay more for an image they want and can't get anywhere else, no matter what their standard rate is. That said, a budget is the end all.

 

My advice, if you're ever in this situation and completely flustered, is to ask them outright "what kind of a budget they're working with." An editor, or photo buyer, puts a premium on getting things done quickly and they might just give you a price you're happy with right off the bat. That said, you never have to accept the offer.

 

And CONGRATS on the double page spread!!!

Edited by KarstenMoran

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And CONGRATS on the double page spread!!!

 

we don´t know if Mcarey got paid in the end.... :)

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we don´t know if Mcarey got paid in the end.... :angry:

 

Hello All,

Sorry for the delay in responding.

Yes I did finally get paid and Mike V was correct it took close to 3 months.I want to thank all of you who responded and helped me out.

Thanks,

Michael :rolleyes:

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Broadly speaking, for US magazines, single page rates should be from around...

 

Circulation: 10,000-20,000 $100-$150

 

20,000-40,000 $150-$250

 

40,00-80,000 $250-$300

 

80,000 - 150,000 $300-400

 

150,000 - 250,000 $400-450

 

250,000 upwards $450 upwards

 

If it's a big international magazine like GQ or FHM, it depends on how much they want/need the image, but I'd use $800 to $1,000 as a benchmark for an inside single page, and ask if it's going to be syndicated across international editions. I heard the cover of Time is around $5,000, but that's just hearsay. If you're in negotiation with a picture desk/researcher, keep it friendly and with luck they'll come back to you again. Bottom line - every image has its own value - a blurred shot of a giant squid in battle with a sperm whale will sell for a hell of a lot more than a pin-sharp image of a commensal shrimp....

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