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black background macro shots?

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i have seen some macro pics with the black background how is this done eg :-apeture settings-shutterspeed iso and strobe setting and so and if there is a web site dealing with this subject i have seen it on a site somwhere,would appreciate any help steve:-)

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Hi Steve,

 

What type of camera equipment are you using?

 

If using a dslr stick the lens on a small f-stop (high number, 16+) and as high as you can shutter speed. It you're usig ttl make sure the camera is in spot metering mode, otherwise use manual. It should only take 2 or 3 shots to get the exposure correct, just remember to review and correct each time.

 

Then play around with strobe positioning to ensure that you aren't lighting the background.

 

If you're on a point and shoot get the smallest f-stop (usually 8-10) and then keep increasing the shutter speed until you start to get a black background, remembering to pick a subject without a nearby background to prevent your strobes lighting it.

 

I'd try a bit of sponge or something that sticks up out of the reef as a test subject, then you're not making anything blind! Thinking about composition and how to get such shots probably means your photography is coming up to the next level where you're not snapping away but taking a more deliberate approach, well done!

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Hi Steve,

 

What type of camera equipment are you using?

 

If using a dslr stick the lens on a small f-stop (high number, 16+) and as high as you can shutter speed. It you're usig ttl make sure the camera is in spot metering mode, otherwise use manual. It should only take 2 or 3 shots to get the exposure correct, just remember to review and correct each time.

 

Then play around with strobe positioning to ensure that you aren't lighting the background.

 

If you're on a point and shoot get the smallest f-stop (usually 8-10) and then keep increasing the shutter speed until you start to get a black background, remembering to pick a subject without a nearby background to prevent your strobes lighting it.

 

I'd try a bit of sponge or something that sticks up out of the reef as a test subject, then you're not making anything blind! Thinking about composition and how to get such shots probably means your photography is coming up to the next level where you're not snapping away but taking a more deliberate approach, well done!

thanks for the info i have a cannon a630 with ike housing and ds125 strobe and 100 degree wide angle lense and 60mm macro lense which i have"t had a chance to use yet as my housing is in for repair :-(

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Also make sure you are shooting into open water if possible (so there is nothing but your subject for the strobe to light) and holding the camera level, do not angle it up, you don't want the surface light.

 

Regards

Gary

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Fast shutter speed and an aperture to match the strobe power and strobe-to-subject distance, and plenty of water behind your subject; it works with wide-angle lenses, too, but you need a really fast strobe synchronisation speed (the Nikon D70 is particularly good):

 

post-4522-1174947612_thumb.jpg

 

After mastering this, the next step is one that exercises underwater photographers even more: "How do i get a BLUE background?"! This time you slow the shutter speed and reduce strobe power or move the strobe further away to "balance" the exposure: so that the same exposure settings work for both the strobe and the natural illumination:

 

post-4522-1174947876_thumb.jpg

 

Sometimes not so easy! So you shoot upwards, towards the sun (right into the sun with macro images, which need a high f-stop):

 

post-4522-1174948090_thumb.jpg

 

The only lucky thing is that the blue water looks good at a variety of exposures, from a dark blue to a light blue:

 

post-4522-1174948270_thumb.jpg

 

Good luck!

 

Tim

 

B)

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Good advice above. I use a little different technique. I up the shutter a little and drop the stop a little to but I use the tilt of the camera more so. Tilt the camera up and allow the light to come in, lilt the camera down and not allow that light to come in.

 

These two shots are from the same day and one after another, a guest asked me the same question you did and these are what I shot to show her. The settings are exactly the same on both images, the only difference is that the blue background is tilted up and nothing in the background to block the blue water and produce the nice blue and the black background is the camera tilted down and I moved slightly to line up a coral head in the background so I'd get black, practice a little with the tilting, it's the easiest.

 

CAY5685.jpg

 

CAY5687.jpg

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Good advice above. I use a little different technique. I up the shutter a little and drop the stop a little to but I use the tilt of the camera more so. Tilt the camera up and allow the light to come in, lilt the camera down and not allow that light to come in.

 

These two shots are from the same day and one after another, a guest asked me the same question you did and these are what I shot to show her. The settings are exactly the same on both images, the only difference is that the blue background is tilted up and nothing in the background to block the blue water and produce the nice blue and the black background is the camera tilted down and I moved slightly to line up a coral head in the background so I'd get black, practice a little with the tilting, it's the easiest.

 

CAY5685.jpg

 

CAY5687.jpg

 

Wow, that's great technique you got there! I'll definitely have to try that out. I usually use the shutter speed to control the background and the aperture to control the subject. I find that it gives the most consistent result.

But getting a blue background is definitely interesting!!! Great photos. I'll have to try this out next time!

 

Now the only problem... Have to arrange my next dive trip!!!!!

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Good advice above. I use a little different technique. I up the shutter a little and drop the stop a little to but I use the tilt of the camera more so. Tilt the camera up and allow the light to come in, lilt the camera down and not allow that light to come in.

 

These two shots are from the same day and one after another, a guest asked me the same question you did and these are what I shot to show her. The settings are exactly the same on both images, the only difference is that the blue background is tilted up and nothing in the background to block the blue water and produce the nice blue and the black background is the camera tilted down and I moved slightly to line up a coral head in the background so I'd get black, practice a little with the tilting, it's the easiest.

 

CAY5685.jpg

 

CAY5687.jpg

:) almost same settings, F16 on the first and F18 on the Second.

Nice technique :rolleyes: I will try it, thanks

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