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DX-D200 shutter speeds

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Hi all,

 

I've recently purchased a Sea&Sea DX-D200 housing and last weekend I had the chance to test it with a couple of strobes I have (Ikelite Substrobe 200 and Sea&Sea YS-60N). Both strobes fired ok, but after a while I noticed that I could bump up the shutter speed way past the flash sync speed of 1/250. Of course, I got partially blacked out photos as expected. What I'd like to know is if this is normal behavior for this housing. It seems that since not all the pins are connected, the camera doesn't "know" that a flash is connected, so it doesn't limit shutter speed but fires the flash anyway. I don't get the "flash ready" indicator in the viewfinder either. I did a search and found out that someone noticed the same thing with an Ikelite housing. Can Sea&Sea housing owners shed a light on this? Is this normal or do I have a faulty housing? Thanks very much...

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it is normal on the 2nd connector - but a strobe plugged on the main connector should lock the sync speed at 1/250 (even if there's a second one)! Meanwhile, it depend on the strobe and/or the cable you're using.

Cheers

Claude

Edited by Claude

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It does the same thing in a Sealux housing, a bit anoying to be without the "flash ready" icon in the viewfinder, but you get used to it.

I'm using Sea & Sea YS60N flash too.

Edited by Johnny Christensen

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Hello,

 

If the bulkhead is not wired with five pins then there is no true communication between the strobe and camera, only fire hence no signs from the camera that there is a flash. With the Sea & Sea housing you can only use one at a time either a five pin to be used with a TTL converter or the other one for manual use. Sea & Sea instructs to not use the five pin without a converter as it might jam the camera up but usually it just won't fire as there is too much "miscommunication" between the strobe and camera.

 

Hope this sheds some light!

 

Cheers,

 

Lee

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