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Canon 40D lens Options

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Having just joined and also about to invest in a 40d this thread is a god send.

 

My choices at the moment are as follows.

 

1. canon 40d body

2. canon 60mm lense

3 iklite housing

4. Ikelite DS 125 (one) strobe

 

Do you guys think this will be adequate to start? Money is an issue.

 

Thanks

 

Ajith

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Having just joined and also about to invest in a 40d this thread is a god send.

 

My choices at the moment are as follows.

 

1. canon 40d body

2. canon 60mm lense

3 iklite housing

4. Ikelite DS 125 (one) strobe

 

Do you guys think this will be adequate to start? Money is an issue.

 

Thanks

 

Ajith

 

That would be more than adequate for a nice macro rig. If you want to do wide angle as well, you'll need to add another lens.

 

Mike

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Well thats done. Just purchased my equipment and waiting for it to arrive. (paying the credit card bill will be considered later :)

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Well thats done. Just purchased my equipment and waiting for it to arrive. (paying the credit card bill will be considered later :)

 

Congrats on pulling the trigger on a new rig. Will be looking for your posts on how it is working for you, as I have everything you listed except I have 2 DS 50 strobes, and I haven't been able to get the housing yet, but soon I hope!

 

Duane

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Thanks to those above for the advice.

 

My 5D just got out of its one-year checkup and I dove with it this weekend shooting both fish and models and I really like the shots the 5D produces.

 

I think I've resisted the urge to "buy new stuff" successfully for now . . . of course, when the new 5D comes out, I'm sure it will start all over again!!

Edited by TonySuber

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Hi all,

 

I too am making the move - from an Oly 7070 to the 40D. As an utter newbie to the DSLR I am bewildered by the choice of lens.

 

Should I just run with the Canon 18-55 to begin with or invest more credit card for something like the Sigma?

 

And what of IS vs non-IS....what is the consensus?

 

I intend to house it in a Nexus when my credit card is released from the reactor....

 

Many thanks

 

Pauli

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Hi again all,

 

After some quick homework and a huttle with the folks at home my choice will be the Sigma 18-50mm f2.8.

 

It's 3 x the price of the standard Canon lens but seems to have everything on it's side......

 

Any feedback from the masses out there?

 

Pauli

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I would buy a specialised macro or wideangle lens as a first underwater lens (I used the 60mm macro as a first).

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After some quick homework and a huttle with the folks at home my choice will be the Sigma 18-50mm f2.8.

Pauli

 

Some love the Sigma lenses, others do not. The biggest problem I've seen with Sigma is the focus speed, but if you are looking at their "new" HSM version of that lens then perhaps it will be better.

 

For UW I have the Canon 10-22mm and a Canon 60mm Macro, both seem to work well and are quality lenses. I love the 10-22mm, I don't leave home without it...its been on every vacation and road trip and gets frequent use. I then use a Canon 24-105 for my "primary" lens, which has quite the reputation for being phenomenal. I also have a Canon 70-300 IS, but it is likely my least used lens and I find it being the one I leave behind the most.

 

If you are looking for all around lens info (not just under water), I'd suggest DPreview.com's forums for Canon Lenses, or Fred Miranda's forums...Google will help you find both. In my research it seems to get more difficult to match up an ideal underwater and surface lens, so good luck :)

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I have used the Canon 17-85, the Canon 60mm and the Sigma 50mm, all with good results.

 

The Canon 60 is the crispest lens of them all in my opinion, with the Sigma not too far behind.

 

One big advantage of the Sigma is the field of view. The Canon 60mm field of view is 24 degrees and the Sigma is 46 degrees. So if you are shooting anything other than macro you have to get pretty far away to get anything of any size.

 

If you plan on using the camera for other than macro, the Sigma 50mm has some advantages to consider.

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Hi guys,

 

Have been shooting with my 40d and I find it awesome after the little P&S I was used to. Of cpourse its taking me some time to get used to handling the strobe properly. I also find that I cannot press the shutter button halfway for AF since it seems too sensitive and just goes all the way and takes the picture. Any ideas what to about that?

 

Also at the moment I only have a canon 60mm macro. Wha should my next lense be?

 

Thanks

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Hi guys,

 

Have been shooting with my 40d and I find it awesome after the little P&S I was used to. Of cpourse its taking me some time to get used to handling the strobe properly. I also find that I cannot press the shutter button halfway for AF since it seems too sensitive and just goes all the way and takes the picture. Any ideas what to about that?

 

Also at the moment I only have a canon 60mm macro. Wha should my next lense be?

 

Thanks

 

One potential solution to your half press problem is to autofocus with the AF-ON or * button (through Custom Function IV). You autofocus with one of those buttons and only do shutter release with the shutter button. Give it a try and see it it works for you.

 

Your next lens should probably be for wide angle. I would recommend the Tokina 10-17 fisheye zoom, the Canon 10-22 or the Tokina 12-24. Check to see which ones will work with your housing and find what dome port you'll need.

 

Mike

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n2addict,

 

Not sure what housing you're using, but as Mike says the * button (or AF On button if you have an Ikelite housing) is a little easier to use and then pull the front trigger to fire.

 

The last Ikelite 40D system I delivered (and played with myself in the pool) I used the AF On button to focus rapidly and simply pulled the trigger with my index finger.

 

Worked for me, especially since I'm considering getting a 40D :)

 

dhaas

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also, when you're set up with the *, you can use it to autofocus, then make a fine manual adjustment for macro if necessary before pressing the shutter release

 

if you're shooting fish, you can use the AI servo and * to follow the fish, then release the shutter (very difficult to maintain a half-press above or below water with the AI servo)

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also, when you're set up with the *, you can use it to autofocus, then make a fine manual adjustment for macro if necessary before pressing the shutter release

 

if you're shooting fish, you can use the AI servo and * to follow the fish, then release the shutter (very difficult to maintain a half-press above or below water with the AI servo)

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Thanks guys i guess i will try the AF button since i use an ikelite housing. Also may be a canon 10-22 should be my next lens?

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I started on this forum earlier in the week, and "decided' to get the G9. Then after reading some more, I "decided' to get the Nikon 300D. Now, after reading a lot from a lot of different places, and after holding the Sony A700, Nikon 300D, and the Canon 40D and considering prices of all three and my never having shot with an SLR before, I decided to "Settle" on the Canon. (I really like the idea of the splash proof Nikon but think the Canon will be easier to use...).

 

Anyway, it seems everybody is happy with their 40D and its ability to focus underwater. That is obviously a critical factor. I've never composed shots using a viewfinder, and thus did not like the Sony A700's inability to use live view (even if it seems that most people use the viewfinder underwater).

 

Ikelite just informed me that my flash was indeed broken - a circuit board had gone bad. That was my first experience with an external flash (destroyed most of my photos by overexposing). Funny thing is, if the damned thing worked as it was supposed to, I'd probably not even be buying an slr camera...

 

What is the "best" option for the housing? I have "saved" a bundle by talking myself out of the Nikon. I expect that I will be satisfied with a single decent flash. I have no idea if I need TTL or not, having only had 1 bad experience with a flash that happened to have been broken....

 

My next dive trip is in July. Going to bahamas. Hoping for some shark action. I would love a set up that gave me a decent lens for shark photography and which would also allow me to get a macro shot of something small. I understand that requires two lenses on an slr -- is that the case even if I get up really close to the shark?

 

I am going to go read my photography book, "Mastering Digital SLR Photography, 2d Ed. B david Busch...I know it won't answer these questions but hopefully it'll make me a more intelligent photographer....

 

Anyway, if someone has a spoon, and would care to comment on the best housing for this D40 camera, I'd appreciate it. I need to know what kind of port/domes I need as well as what kind of lenses. Lots of people favoring Tokina 10-17 Fisheye, and some the Canon FE 15mm. I haven't a clue what I can shoot with either lens, but if happened to be "Sharks and Nudibranchs" I'd be one happy camper...

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Anyway, if someone has a spoon, and would care to comment on the best housing for this D40 camera, I'd appreciate it. I need to know what kind of port/domes I need as well as what kind of lenses. Lots of people favoring Tokina 10-17 Fisheye, and some the Canon FE 15mm. I haven't a clue what I can shoot with either lens, but if happened to be "Sharks and Nudibranchs" I'd be one happy camper...

 

Hi David,

 

I'm quessing you need to be careful how you weigh peoples answers to your question of who has the best housing. Lots of good ones out there and most folks tend to like the one they bought. (Helps us justify the expense). I love my Sea & Sea for the 40D, but I've never dove anything else for digital. Since you need to do something in a hurry I would recommend you head for one of the shops and compare in person. There are a lot of variables, kind of images you want to take, lenses available, ports, strobes, etc. A reputable firm will ask a bunch of questions before giving you some recommendations. If your in the US I have been impressed with U'W Phototech on the east coast, Reef Photo in Florida and Backscatter in CA.in no partcular order. All of these folks have nice shops with real stuff you can hold in your hands and compare. I didn't see what part of the world you're in so not sure where to point you.

 

As too your Sharks and nudibrach lens, I guess it depends on how close you want to get to the Shark :P . If that magic lens exists, I haven't heard of it. I'm falling in love with the Tokina 10-17 and I'm finding it will do an amazing job getting much closer for smaller subjects than I expected. But for the killer macro nudibrach profile you're still going to need the 60mm or the 100mm. If you click on the Sea & Sea link to the right, you can see take a look at their system charts that list the availble ports etc. just to get an idea. Good Luck

 

Steve

Edited by williamshs

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Thanks, Steve. I'm in New York. I have a colleague that does a lot of UW photography and moonlights at B&H. Once they open again, I will pick his brain and perhaps let them pick my pocket. I take it the Tonika 10-17 does a good job with the big life? I am more than happy having lens that lets me shoot fast swimming sharks and gives me a"good" but not "stellar" macro shot. I have to grow into my future camera, and don't drool over the idea of having a plethora of lenses for the "perfect shot"

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Thanks, Steve. I'm in New York. I have a colleague that does a lot of UW photography and moonlights at B&H.
Oh man if I lived close to B&H I'd be in there all the time. Be prepared for a major step up in size, cost, and work involved in going from the G9 to the 40D. Have your friend show you some choices. There are some stellar images being made with the mid range cameras. At the same time don't be too freaked out by the size of the DSLR housing, it handles really nice in the water. Have them add up all the costs of the different rigs for you. Ports, arms, lenses, etc. for you to make an intelligent decsion. Have a great time and enjoy!

 

Steve

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......if happened to be "Sharks and Nudibranchs" I'd be one happy camper...
The lens that comes nearest to filling that requirement would be the Sigma 17-70 macro. Medium wide angle down to 1:2.3 macro.

 

Then lenses I use with my 40D are Tokina 10-17 & 12-24, Sigma 17-70 and Canon 60 & 100 macro. Out of those the three that get the most use are the 10-17, 17-70 and 100.

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just got back from the Solomons - decided to try the 60 M on my 20d instead of the 100 for better autofocus

 

60 is marginally better autofocus, and a pretty good fish lens -- but the working distance in my Aquatica macro port is only about 2 inches at 1:1 - too close to the subject to get any light in, and for many subjects just too close

 

i had hoped that the aiming light on my Inon would be enough for focusing, but it is not. my conclusion is that the 100 is the better choice for macro - and i need a good focus light

 

part of this trip also included a shark feed in Fiji and whale sharks in WA. the 10-22 worked well

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Oh man if I lived close to B&H I'd be in there all the time. Be prepared for a major step up in size, cost, and work involved in going from the G9 to the 40D. Have your friend show you some choices. There are some stellar images being made with the mid range cameras. At the same time don't be too freaked out by the size of the DSLR housing, it handles really nice in the water. Have them add up all the costs of the different rigs for you. Ports, arms, lenses, etc. for you to make an intelligent decision. Have a great time and enjoy!

 

Steve

Well, Steve, in the fast changing world of, "David shopping for a camera", I wound up buying a Nikon D300 from Costco. It'll arrive in a few weeks. One benefit to having so much time before my camera arrives is that I can read the user manual without being distracted by the pesky camera. I'm at page 120 or so now. The other benefit is that I'll have until end of July to return it if I don't love it. (With the downside being, I would have read 400 pages of a camera booklet for a camera I'm not going to use). My next dive vacation is July 5 (Aqua Cat/Bahamas). Too bad Costco does not sell housings. ;) Edited by DavidScubadiver

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All - Have purchased a Canon 40D to replaced my drowned CZ5060. Have been using with a Canon 17-85 lens topside with good results as we all wait for the housings to be released. Personally I have my eye on the Aquatica... but we'll see. Now looking for advice on two specific lens categories (trying to spread out the cash bleed....) wide angle and macro.

 

Advice and counsel much appreciated!!

 

thanks,

 

r

 

The 60mm Macro will work wonders

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The 60mm Macro will work wonders

A agree on the 60 and the Tokina 10-17

Bill

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