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Well, that's the marketing statement.

 

ikeliteport_001.jpg

 

I'd be more upset if it happened during the 1st dive of the trip as opposed to after the last dive of the trip. Ikelite will probably replace it for free.

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Same old.. same old... poor quality control Vs. great customer service.

 

Hopefully this will end with the new flat port system. Although, it will be fare that Ikelite receive old ports as part of payment, when you buy new rings and ports of the new system.

 

Well, for sure they´ll replace all your drowned system.

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So what happened: I don't suppose it just came apart like that but suffered some kind of impact ?

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This is the third time I heard/see the glue from the port going off like that. Neither of the other 2 stories includes any sort of impact at all. All cases was as I said, quality control failure.

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I don't suppose it just came apart like that but suffered some kind of impact ?

 

It was sitting on a table, albeit the port was in contact with the table as it was resting.

 

Per Ikelite, they've had some random failures. Nothing was damaged other than the port. I went to take the port off the housing to pack and it came off in my hand.

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amazes me. maybe it wasnt degreased properly enough before gluing. Mostly the glue bond is stronger then the material.

 

Lucky it didnt happen underwater !

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I have literally hundreds of dives this year on an Ikelite D80 case and flat ported 60mm with no issues ever. Once you hear back from Ikelite on this please post what the outcome is as I am very interested in why yours broke and if my system is at risk based on batch number or production date etc.

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You 60mm port is probably mad of one piece of tubing, only longer ports have two "bits".. Check if your port has a glue line. where two

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I just had the same thing on a 60mm port in December. Luckily, I put the camera in the rinse bucket before the dive and noticed bubbles coming from the glued seam in the barrel of the port. Some water came in but the camera was port down, so no damage occurred from flooding. I returned it to Ikelite who sent a replacement port with no comment. It may be wise for anyone with a 60mm port to make a careful inspection of the joint area and maybe pressure test their system without a camera in the housing.

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It happened to a friend of mine while on a dive, he posted it here some time ago, ike did make it right but like I said at the time, simply gluing 2 smooth flat peices of plastic together does not seem like a good idea.

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.. simply gluing 2 smooth flat pieces of plastic together does not seem like a good idea.

Indeed, that's shocking design. Would have thought a slip collar over the joint would be a minimum requirement for a glued assembly like this.

Edited by Balrog

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I just noticed that i didnt finish my message properly: I meant to say you can see a joint where the two parts are glued together. I cant see a joint like that in my 60mm port, so that must be a different problem.

 

I had a look at my longer port, and that has the same joint (luckily still attached). I tried pulling and twisting gently, and nothing happened.

 

Any ideas how to test this: will one dive with an empty rig do, or do I twist and pull some more and use it with camera straight away? Or reinforce it ?

 

How big is the chance of something happening: Ikelite has a large volume of housings out there, and they're not the only brand that ever flooded....

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It happened to a friend of mine while on a dive, he posted it here some time ago, ike did make it right but like I said at the time, simply gluing 2 smooth flat peices of plastic together does not seem like a good idea.

 

Actually, depending on the glue system, perfectly smooth, matching flat machined surfaces is EXACTLY what you want. Usually the glue to material bond for most mechanical adhesives is better than the material strength itself. I'd agree with other posters here that this seems like a sign that either the surfaces were contaminated before bonding, or perhaps the glue itself was 'faulty' (bad batch with incorrect or outdated mix, bad cure cycle, etc.). Surfaces like this let you do some clamping pressure during any cure, while an 'annular' mating surface (e.g. having a wider cylinder shelling over a narrower) does not. They could do a step, with both an overhang and a flat mate, but then unless the wall thickness increases the bond is weaker since the flat mating surface has been thinned (again, the annular face mate doesn't add much bond strength for this type of bonding).

 

You see stuff glued together with overlay collars to correct for slop in the finishing (namely you don't have a guaranteed good mate surface), and because the cement used in those cases (e.g. PVC plumbing) actually reacts with the outer layers of material itself and 'softens' them, performing a chemical weld. Works for a mechanical bond, but doesn't necessarily give you good physical control of the resulting bonded 'shape' until it's hardened. Great for plumbing where you often want to be able to adjust the relative postion of two pieces to make up for things not lining up perfectly. But you wouldn't want your flat or domed port either tilted or translated off normal from the lens axis, so that's easiest to control with a controlled joint like this I'd bet.

 

None of which exonerates the actual situation - I'd think they could do some sort of 'bang test' (whack the port against a hard rubber surface or something - soft enough not to scratch/ding the edge, but hard enough to otherwise convey a pretty solid shock) to make sure they don't have a catastrophic bond failure before shipping. But again, usually you control your bonding processes by controlling your materials (keeping the adhesives stored properly, with experation dates, cleaning the bonding surfaces, control your cure cycle, etc.) so you don't HAVE to test. Either way the system let a bad batch go through, apparently.

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For a very brief time we switched to an adhesive tape that is also used in major applications such as airplanes. We had hoped that this would be an even more reliable and easily replicated assembly process than the industrial glue we have always used. This tape was tested extensively in house for over a year to make sure that it would not break down over time or due to impact.

 

Unfortunately a few have broken apart, apparently due to some unknown and random contamination of the material. We have seen a much larger number that are still very securely bonded with no signs of loosening. We have long since switched back to our gluing method that has worked for decades, so there is no fear of new ports exhibiting similar behavior.

 

We not only replace ports that return with this problem, but also repair/replace any equpiment damaged due to it. We always strive for the highest quality in our products. As nobody is perfect, we always appreciate the opportunity to correct equipment failure.

 

Jean / Ikelite

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Maybe Ike can explain why there is a joint on the cylindrical part of the port to begin with (at least that's the way it looks in the photo). Perhaps a bad design from an engineering standpoint?

Edited by jcclink

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I think it may have to do with constantly changing lens lengths, etc.

 

I'd venture a guess that molding a bazillion varying port lengths in how many different increments would certainly be more expensive. Plus, (even if I get flamed as biased) how many flat Ikelite ports are out there versus how miniscule the number might have this problem?

 

I freely admit to not being a polymer engineer! Just one guy who likely has seen more of these used over the years (that's 38 years now, boys and girls) than all other brands combined. And I've never personally seen a flat port barrel come apart like this.

 

Sad it happened, but it appears they're working to keep UW photographer's equipment business by offering a resolution quickly.

 

dhaas

post-244-1199674588_thumb.jpg

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Yep, sounds like it was just a bad batch of a film adhesive. These things happen. (Sorry to sound 'flippant', but they do ... I work for a defense contractor designing the seekers for things that go 'boom' and sometimes your supplier sells you crap goods with all the right certifications. You have to hope your process catches it, and if not, that you can do undo the damage or get the suspected bad parts out of the system afterwards. Same as meat and peanut butter recalls, eh? :P ) Sounds like Ike's taking care of people as usual.

 

The whole issue won't turn me off from their stuff, but it is nice to know about the possibility - not sure if some more of these might be lurking in back stockrooms somewhere (e.g. Adorama or whatnot....)?

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I am still pondering on how to test it properly, to be sure to take it safe underwater.

 

After a look at the glue joint of my port, there is a small area that looks a b it different from the rest. I did a small test immersing it in a bucket of water (port only), no water got in. I also tried twisting and pulling it, and tapping it a bit on the table.

 

Any other testing ideas to see if this isnt from the bad batch.?

 

Gerard

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I also tried twisting and pulling it, and tapping it a bit on the table.

 

Any other testing ideas to see if this isnt from the bad batch.?

 

Gerard

 

Drop it from a second floor... :P

 

Nah.. seriously, don´t try it so hard. Let it soak a for a week, take it out and try twist it a little bit, not too hard. That should at least leave only bad luck as cause of a failure.

 

I´m 100% sure that Ikelite will respond for all your drowned equipment in this case, but I wonder If they will pay both shipments if you are outside U.S., and that´s is my main concern on this issue. As I see it, If you are living within U.S. territory, you are safe. Just pay something like a 50$ on a Kenko´s and send it back to Ikelite via Fedex, but If you are living or working outside U.S., is very likely to cost you a lot more than that...

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If film adhesives go bad, usually it will either show up with a moisture soak as already stated, or in a shear release under thermal stress (differing CTE with the material being cemented). That said, I'd hardly recommend either boiling or microwaving the port....might kinda invalidate the warranty :D I'd think if the soak doesn't show a problem, you're pretty safe.

 

Now if you're planning on diving one of them Utah hot springs at like 100 degrees F, then putting in a pot of hot water might be a valid test after all, regardless of the impact on the warranty! :D

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