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Do you keep your o'rings in your housing when you fly?

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I was told not to do this but my brand new Oly PT-037 came with the o-rings installed. So I'm figuring, it had to have been shipped that way, and it was probably flown in a cargo hold. Should I take them out before I leave for Curacao on Sat.? The manual does say not to store them in the housing for a long time, and I never did with my previous housing.

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(saying this with a wink :) )

 

If you were happy with your previous "tactics" (as recommended in the manual), why change? Especially since there is no big difference in effort between leaving them in vs out of the groove ;)

 

I keep my O-rings inside the housing (when not diving, i.e. during storage or flight), "inside" as in not in the groove, so that the next time I want to take my housing underwater, I'm reminded that I have to check them before putting them in place.

 

Best regards,

 

Bartus

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I never do, i either take the oring out completely for my compact canon housings or with my SLR i keep the two halves seperated. With the video i also take the orings out.

 

I figure it is a pretty easy way of saving the life of an oring. I always take it off to clean it after travelling anyway so no biggie. Just fold it over and put it in a ziploc or in the housing itself

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(not talking about flying but storage:

 

The one thing that always keeps me from not putting the oring between the halves (and keeping it uncompressed) is that the halves might damage eachother, damaging the sealing surface in the process. Is that a reasonable fear?

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(not talking about flying but storage:

 

The one thing that always keeps me from not putting the oring between the halves (and keeping it uncompressed) is that the halves might damage eachother, damaging the sealing surface in the process. Is that a reasonable fear?

I am totally confused by this question. Color me dumb. Are you saying not to close the housing up without the o-rings in?

 

Well, I never flew with my o-rings in before. Whether that was good or not, who knows since I did flood my other camera. But that was my fault. I dived with the housing without the camera after the flood and it was fine. I still have not figured out where I goofed so needless to say, I am really scared this time. :)

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I don't remove the O-rings, but I don't seal the hosing either. With my Ikelite DSLR housing I keep the back o-ring on and the the back latched. There is no port attached so it is not pressure sealed which you DO want to avoid while flying. I keep the back latched with o-ring when the housing is stored as well, so it's no different from flying. My D70 housing seems to have fared just fine for the last 4 years of traveling and storage in this way.

 

If you have a P&S housing that does not use ports, then yes I think you need to remove the o-ring so the housing is not pressure sealed while flying.

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(not talking about flying but storage:

 

The one thing that always keeps me from not putting the oring between the halves (and keeping it uncompressed) is that the halves might damage eachother, damaging the sealing surface in the process. Is that a reasonable fear?

 

 

Not sure about that, I would think the only possibility of damage would come if it got knocked around some. If it was secure and not touched then should be no problem. I actually store mine in a camera bag with each side on opposite side of bag so they don't actually touch each other

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though you have to consider-

 

when you dive with your camera you don't equalize it. These things are ment to withstand pretty intense presure without breaking. Thats why it can be shipped with the o-ring in place and not sustain any damage. However, as general rule of thumb I take mine out so it doesn't compressed and wear out and so that i'm forced to take the time to reinstall it which includes cleaning and checking for damage. IMO, I would take it out even if I wasn't flying.

 

 

 

(not talking about flying but storage:

 

The one thing that always keeps me from not putting the oring between the halves (and keeping it uncompressed) is that the halves might damage eachother, damaging the sealing surface in the process. Is that a reasonable fear?

 

 

I think it sort of depends on the housing. On Ike housings you needn't worry as the sealing surfaces can't touch each other without the o-ring in place but you should still be carefull not to make any nicks in the plastic. With double o-ring systems i think the theory should still hold water- that is, the o-ring groves most likley wont touch without the o-rings so it shouldnt hurt. that could vary houinsg to housing though, I don't know...

 

 

-Mike

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HI,

you can always cut short bits of an old Oring fit in to the housing

& close the seal this way it will not get pressurised.

Hope this helps.

Andy :);)

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Won't the pressure be higher inside the sealed housing than outside if you seal it before flying?

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I always fly with all my o-rings out of whatever they are in, housing, flash, even my flashlights. I live in the mountains and when I get to sea level the difference in pressure is enormous, but even so it is always a good idea to remove the o-rings when not in use, I do it always when I am storing all these items between dive trips, then they are ready for the plane.

 

A real easy way to store them is to remove them, curl them up if necessary slip them into a small ziplock bag (there is a snack size that is just perfect) and stuff the bag in the housing, battery compartment, etc. That way the o-ring is protected in the housing from getting crushed or sliced, the housing is protected from getting grease on the glass because of the o-ring, the o-ring is protected from getting dirt and fibers on it in the bag, the o-ring is not being deformed for long periods of time. Its a good thing for everyone.

Edited by tuffshed

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What I've done while flying is to leave the o-ring in place, but put a piece of paper across the o-ring from inside to outside the housing. This keeps the 2 halves of the hosing from banging against each other but prevents an airtight seal.

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The pressure difference while flying is almost nothing and the camera cases can easily manage it.

Pressure at sea level is 1 Atmosphere. The pressure in an aircraft pressurized to 8000 ft is slightly less than than that so there is more differential pressure across the O ring on a 10 ft dive.......has this topic suddenly gone all technical!! :wacko:

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I have flown with O rings in place for years with out problems (knock on wood). I know that others have done the same, therefore there is no right answer to this. I recently had my housing serviced and the O rings around the buttons changed, lots of small particulate matter was found around the button O rings. That worries me more than the the main O ring(s) that you can easily see and correct problems .

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I was just wondering why, if the manual tells you not to store the orings in the housing, why they ship it to you that way and how long the orings have been in there before they sell it to you.

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I too have always packed my housings, whether carried as hold or cabin baggage, with the o-rings in place and the housings sealed. I do not leave the o-rings in place when I store the housings long-term.

 

As I understand it, cabin pressure depressurises to about 8,000 ft (10.91 psi) which is just a 25% variation from sea level. If carried in an unpressurised hold (assuming 30,000 ft), the variation from sea level is 70% (4.36 psi). This may be compared with a variation of 300% (58.8 psi) when we dive to 40 metres, and I guess we're all happy with that?

 

Sure, forces are working the other way, but does an o-ring in a groove know that? Just MHO...

Edited by Timmoranuk

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