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wchen

Stuart Cove's Shark Diving

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Hi all,

 

It's been 5 months since my last dive trip as well as posting to this forum. I just got back from the Bahamas diving with Stuart Cove's. The shark diving was really nice. You get two dives. The first dive is to scout out the feeding site and followed by a short wall dive with many reef sharks within camera distance. The second dive is the feeding. The water is relatively clean for a feeding because they use large chunk bait rather than buckets of fish grind. After a while, lots of particles are kicked up by the sharks, fish, and the human audience.

 

Link to Shark Gallery Here

 

One note about the lionfish in Providence Island, Bahamas. The lionfish has totally infested and populated the dive sites and wrecks. I saw at least 100 in 10 dives. Who knows how many there really are outside of the dive sites. This is very concerning...

 

comments/questions welcomed.

 

-- will

Edited by wchen

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Hi all,

 

It's been 5 months since my last dive trip as well as posting to this forum. I just got back from the Bahamas diving with Stuart Cove's. The shark diving was really nice. You get two dives. The first dive is to scout out the feeding site and followed by a short wall dive with many reef sharks within camera distance. The second dive is the feeding. The water is relatively clean for a feeding because they use large chunk bait rather than buckets of fish grind. After a while, lots of particles are kicked up by the sharks, fish, and the human audience.

 

Link to Shark Gallery Here

 

One note about the lionfish in Providence Island, Bahamas. The lionfish has totally infested and populated the dive sites and wrecks. I saw at least 100 in 10 dives. Who knows how many there really are outside of the dive sites. This is very concerning...

 

comments/questions welcomed.

 

-- will

 

Yes, I agree that the infestation of lion fish in the Carribean may soon be problematic. These are beautiful fish but they are not native to the Atlantic and seem to be thriving all to well. Who knows how this will impact the ecosystem.

Any ideas about what should or should not be done about the lion fish infestation?

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When I was in the Bahamas, a volunteer team from the US were there to "remove" and study the lionfish. After "removal", these guys brought the fish back to their hotel rooms for disection and parasite analysis. Yah, kind of a weird group... They're looking at using parasites as one vector to eradicate the lionfish. This reminds me of what happened in Hawaii with mongooses.

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Hey William, your still alive?

 

Nice Pics.

 

Having grown up on the Great Lakes I know what it is like when alien species invade an eco system. Unfortunately it is very tough to do anything about it.

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Any ideas about what should or should not be done about the lion fish infestation?

Make them a delicacy ... get the east coast's finest restaurants to serve them at $100/plate ... before you know it, they'll be overfished and the problem will be significantly lessened.

 

I'm only half-joking. If people wanted to eat them, it would probably help. Anyone ever eat one?

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When I was in YAP, Micronesia some of the locals were spear-fishing for and eating lionfish. They told me it was quite tastey, but I chose to pass on the lionfish dining experience...

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